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July 20, 1965 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1965-07-20

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TUESDAY, JULY 20, 1965

THlE MICHIIGAN D1AILYV

-

PREVENT CONG RAIDS:
Marines Strengthen

Has Today's

English Teaching Faile

Viet Base

PAGE THREE
d?I

By The Associated Press
DA NANG, Viet Nam-United
States Marine riflemen moved
yesterday to close a ring of steel
around the DaNang air base,
where construction crews are ex-
panding the huge base.
Leathernecks in new, light
weight fiber glass helmets and
laden with weapons and ammuni-
tion took over positions south of
the base.
They hoped to seal off a route
used by Viet Cong guerrillas in a
hit-and-run raid July 1.
The area previously was guard-
ed by Vietnamese troops.
Intelligence Reports
Intelligence reports indicated
World News
Roind up
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Senate
passed late yesterday a "cold war
G.I. Bill of Rights" measure pro-
viding monthly educational allow-
ances and loan benefits to post-
Korean veterans.
The vote was 69-17.
* * *
PASADENA, Calif.-Mariner 4
was radioing yesterday what may
be some of its most interesting
pictures of Mars-electronic im-
ages of areas some scientists think
could be vegetation-but there
was no hint of when they would
be released.
BUCHAREST, Romania - Ro-
manian Communist party chief
Nicolae Ceausescu called on the
Soviet and Chinese Communist
parties yesterday to make a "sin-
cere aid comradely" new effort to
settle their long-seething conflict.
HONOLULU - Syngman Rhee,
90, founder and first president of
the Korean republic, died in exile
yesterday in Honolulu, his dream
of spending his last days in his
own country, unfulfilled.
BERLIN-At least one East Ger-
man helicopter hovered over Ber-
lin yesterday in defiance of four-
power air agreements, West Berlin
customs officers reported.
They spotted the craft on the
East Berlin side of the border in
the city's Kreuzberg section along
the Spree river. Another Cora-
munist helicopter was sighted by
the customs men, but they could
not say whether it was East Ger-
man or Russian.

that, even as the recently rein-
forced Marines moved into their
new positions, the guerrillas con-
tinued to build up their own forces
in the rice paddies and wooded
areas to the south. There was
speculation seven or more Viet
Cong battalions may now be
operating within 15 miles of Da
Nang. That could mean 2,800 or
more men.
Informed military sources said
the prospects are that the Viet
Cong might still be able to in-
filtrate the base to plant bombs,
but that a successful major as-
sault was less likely.
President Ho Chi Minh of North
Viet Nam vowed yesterday that
his people would fight another
20 years or more if necessary to
achieve final victory.
Broadcast
In a double-barreled statement
broadcast by radio Hanoi, Ho call-
ed on Americans to end the 'ag-
gressive war" of their government
and on the South Vietnamese sol-
diers and government to cease
what he called their slavish sub-
servience to the United States.
He issued the appeals in con-
nection with the 11th anniversary
tomorrow of the Geneva agree-
ments ending French colonial rule
in Indochina and creating North
and South Viet Nam.
He again implicitly ruled out
peace talks on Viet Nam on any
but his terms. These include the
immediate withdrawal of U.S.
troops.
Shot Down
It was announced a U.S. Navy
A6 Intruder was shot down Sun-
day a short time after Secretary
of Defense Robert McNamara
Ask Court To
Restrain Klan
BOGALUSA, La. (P)-A federal
court was asked yesterday to hold
this city's top police officials in
contempt and enjoin the Ku Klux
Klan from interfering with civil
rights demonstrations.
John Doar, justice department
official sent as a White House
troubleshooter filed legal actions
in federal district court at New
Orleans-65 miles southeast of
this troubled papermill town.
He asked that public safety
commissioner Arnold Spiers and
police chief Claxton Knight be
held in both civil and criminal
contempt.
Doar is an assistant attorney
general in charge of the justice
department's civil rights division.
The twin legal moves came as
civil rights workers pushed ahead
with picketing and street demon-
strations, actions that have pro-
duced frequent racial clashes in
recent weeks.f
A march yesterday was the 17th I
in a series that began last January
with the testing of public accom-
modations. The marchers are de-
manding equal job opportunities
for Negroes and desegregation of
public facilities.
DIAL 8-6416

watched the big jet and 13 other
planes catapulted from the 7th
fleet carrier Independence for an
attack on port facilities at Ham
Rong, 85 miles south of Hanoi.
A spokesman said the two crew-
man parachuted to land, but a
search and rescue operation fail-
ed to locate them and its was
presumed both were captured. Re-

turning pilots said antiaircraft
fire was very heavy, but they de-
stroyed a number of buildings
with bombs and rockets.
Rail Link
A railway link between China
and North Viet Nam-the Kun-
ming-Hanoi line-was the target
of three attacks by U.S. air force
pilots.
The deepest penetration of the
campaign was made by four U.S.
Air Force F105 Thunderchiefs, a
spokesman announced. T h e y
bombed the tracks northwestward
from a point 90 miles from Hanoi.
The Viet Cong killed three
Americans and wounded several
in their overnight attack on newly
arrived elements of the 1st in-
fantry division near the Bien Hoa
air base, a U.S. spokesman said
yesterday.
The guerrillas struck under
cover of a torrential rain. They
opened up with a motar barrage,
then moved in infiltrators. The
infantrymen shot back. Helicop-
ters strafed suspected Viet Cong
positions until the action died in
midmorning. Viet Cong casualties,
if any, were not determined.

By ROBERT MOORE
"The teaching of English has
failed to come to grips with the
type of wisdom that people need,"
publisher - educator William D.
Boutwell said yesterday, in a
speech before an English teach-
ers' conference here.
Boutwell was recently named the
Outstanding Contributor to the
Teaching of English by a na-
tional English education group,
and, as vice-president of Scholas-
tic Magazines, initiated the suc-
cessful Teen-Age Book Club.
The province of education is
wisdom, he began, and in to-
day's world English teachers are
not taking the best way to pre-
sent students with the wisdom that
exists in literature.
Evidence
Boutwell pointed to evidence
that the public's attitude toward
literature has drastically changed.
"The stock-in-trade of English
is fiction," he said. "But nowa-
days, fiction is little sought and
very little trusted."
On Broadway, he said, not a
single new serious play was pro-
duced during one recent year.
Books-except for paperbacks-

sell little, and non-fiction outsells
fiction, he said.
Most classics, Boutwell said, are
unpopular because they aren't
written in today's language, but in
a language "that hasn't been
standard American since the
twenties."
"Poetry," he added, "has al-
most lost its audience."
Real Need
But there is still a real need
for literature today, Boutwell said.
"I invite English teachers to dig
into the problems of mass com-
munication, to the problems of
people who try for light and
wisdom, to the problems whose
solutions can come from English
classes more than from any other
class in the curriculum.
English teachers should relate
their readings in class to reality
-to the problems that students
face, Boutwell said.
He pointed to the problems of
racial discrimination, of divorce
and separation, of cybernation
and of inter-personal relations as
issues which literature could help
explain.
One sign of the failure of Eng-
lish teaching, he said, is shown
by simple greeting cards.
Intelligent Person
"Everytime an intelligent per-
son passes a card shop," Boutwell
said, "he should shudder. People
feel so inadequate to express their
feelings that-like illiterate Asians
-they have to have a professional
writer come in phrase them for
him."
Another indication of the fail-
ure is in bad television shows, he
said. "College graduates should
be picketing Madison Avenue, ask-
ing for good television shows," in-
stead of merely not watching the,

HO CHI MINH

The Week To Come: a Campus Calendar

William A

TUESDAY, JULY 20
12:00 m.-The Office of Relig-
ious Affairs will present a book
discussion with Sister Zoe Barry,
O.S.B. on Teilhard de Chardin's
"The Phenomenon of Man" in
Anderson Room D, Michigan
Union.
1:30 p.m.-The Audio-Visual
education center will present a
film preview entitled "Woodrow
Nilson" in the Multipurpose
Room of the UGLI.
7:30 p.m.-The Linguistic In-
stitute Forum-Lecture will present
H. A. Gleason, Jr. on "Writing
Systems-their Form and Place"
in the Natural Science Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The University Musi-
cal Society Summer Concert Series
will present Philippe Entremont,
pianist in Rackham Aud.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 21
1:30 p.m.-The Audio-Visual
education center will present a film
preview entitled "Wild Highlands
and Scotland" in the Multipurpose
room of the UGLI.
8:00 p.m.-The Department of
Speech and the University Players
will present Peter Shaffer's "The
Private Ear and The Public Eye"
in Mendelssohn Theater.
THURSDAY, JULY 22
1:30 p.m.-The Audio-Visual
education center will present a
film preview entitled "Overture,"
"T h r e e Grandmothers," and
"Children Without" in the Multi-
purpose room of the UGLI.
7:30 p.m.-The Linguistic In-
stitute Forum Lecture will present
John Carroll speaking on "Sub-
jective Measurements in Psycho-
linguistics" in the Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.
8:00 p.m.-The Department of
Speech and the University Play-
ers will present Peter Shaffer's
"The Private Ear and The Public
Eye" in Mendelssohn Theater.
FRIDAY, JULY 23
1:30 p.m.--The Audio-Visual
education center will present a

film preview entitled "Arctic Re-
gion and its Polar Bears" and
"Japan: its Customes and Tra-
ditions" in the basement of West
Quad.
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.-The Cinemaj
Guild will present the Marx
Brothers in "Horsefeather" in the
Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The Department of
Speech and the University Play-
ers will present Peter Shaffer's'

"The Private Ear and the Public
Eye" in Mendelssohn Theater.
SATURDAY, JULY 24
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.-The Cimema
Guild will present the Marx
Brothers in "Horsefeathers" in
the Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The Department of
Speech and the University Play-
ers will present Peter Shafer's
"The Private Ear and The Public
Eye" in Mendelssohn Theater.

bad television shows.
"Television," he added, "is the
vulgate (people's language) of our
day." That it is such a wasteland is
a fault of English teachers, who
ignore the present and concen-
trate on the ideas and media of
the past.
Sociologists,
Sociologists, psychologists, and
counselors abound today. "And
people trust these more than they
trust literature" because the
teachers of literature have made

I

. Boutwell
the mistakes as they have, Bout-
well said.
People also turn to mathematics
and the physical sciences for "wis-
dom" more than they do to lit-
erature, he complained.
Boutwell gave an example of
his point by reading a selection
from a poem by Tennyson that
was extremely difficult to under-
stand but which concerned the
question of the individual's iden-
tity in a confusing world-perhaps
the most vital question of to-
day.

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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EhneOw CARPENTER ROAD
THE AREA'S NEWEST
AND FINEST DRIVE IN
Box Office Opens at 7:30
ENDS TONIGHT
ALL COLOR PROGRAM
"GIRLS ON THE
BEAC H"
Shown at 8:30 Only

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 .p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
TUESDAY, JULY 20
Day Calendar
Center for Programmed Learning for
Business Workshop for Programmers -
Geary A. Rummier, director, "Use
Evaluation, Selection, and Writing of
Proframmed Materials": 8:30 a.m.,
Michigan Union.
Doctoral Examination for Richard Earl
Corpron, Anatomy; thesis: "The Ul-
trastructure of the Gastric Mucosa in
Normal and Hypophysectomized Rats,"
Tues., July 20, 4558 E. Medical Bldg.,
3 p.m. Chairman, B. L. Baker,
National Band Conductors Conference
-Registration, School of Music, 8 a.m.
Institute on Urban and Regional An-
alysis-Michigan League, 8 a.m.
Band Conductors Conference Recita
-Harry Berv, French hornist: Recital
Hall, School of Music, 8:30 a.m.
Office of Religious Affairs Book Dis-
cussion-Sister Zoe Barry, O.S.B., doc-
toral candidate, Comparative Literature,
"Teilhard's de Chardin's 'The Phe-
nomenon of Man' ": Anderson Room D,
Michigan Union, 12 m.
Band Conductors Conference Recital
-Bramwell Smith, trumpeter: Recital
Hall, School of Music, 1:30 p.m.
Audio-Visual Education Center Film
Preview-"Woodrow wilson": Multipur-
pose Room, Undergraduate Library, 1:30
p.m.
Band Conductors Conference Recital
-Bobby Christian, percussionist: Reci-
tal Hall, School of Music, 3:45 p.m.
Linguistic Institute Forum Lecture -
volney Stefflre, departments of psy-
chology and sociology, "Language and
Behavior": Natural Science Aud., 7:30
p.m.
University Musical Society Summe
Concert Series Recital-Philippe Entre-

mont, pianist: Rackham Aud., 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
French and German Screening Exami-
nations: The screening examinations in
French and German for Doctoral candi-
dates will be administered on Thurs.,
July 29 from 3-5 p.m. in Aud. A, Angell
Hall. Doctoral candidates must pass the
screening examination before taking the
written test in French or German, un-
less they have received B or better in
French 111 or German 111. Those who
fail the examination may take it again
when the test is administered in Sep-
tember.
Candidates are asked to bring their
own No. 2 pencils.
Foreign Visitors
The following are the foreign visi-
tors programmed through the Interna-
tional Center who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements are being made by
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, International
Center, 764-2148.
Miss Kristiina Kivivuori, translator
and editor, Oy Weilin & Goos Ab, Hel-
sinki, Finland, July 18-24.
Ntauhigo Yosida, assistant professor
of philosophy, Tokyo Institute of Tech-
nology, Tokyo, Japan, July 18-21.
Jozef Zawadzki, full professor of high-
er economics, University of Warsaw,
Warsaw, Poland, July 20.
Ten Brazilian student leaders, stu-
dent leaders, University of Bahia, Sal-
vador, Brazil, July 20-25.
Ariyoshi Mizunoe, professor of Eng-
lish literature, Saga University, Kyushu,
Japan, July 21.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Reg-
ular meeting, July 20, Room 3B, Michi-
gan Union. Speaker: Marvin Christian-
son. Topic: "Christianity in Non-Tra-
ditional Terms."
BEACH TRIP
Sat., July 24 (9-4),
Sign up Wed.,
July 21 (1-4)
STUDENT OFFICES
2nd floor Union
Sponsored by UAC

Andre Charles Thiriet, senior lecturer,
University of Dakar, Senegal, July 21-
28.
Aimuirovbaek M. Giwa-Osagie, man-
aging director, Market Research Ltd.,
Lagos, Nigeria, July 24-Aug. 21,
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Lake Shore, Inc., Iron Mountain, Mich.
-Openings with mfr. of mining, ma-
rine & other indust. machinery in-
cluding 1. Mech. design engrs., min. 6
yrs. exper. 2. Structural engr., BSCE
plus 5 yrs. exper. 3. Structural detail
leader, 5 yrs. exper. in steel des. &
detailing. Some college desirable.
Kordite oCrp., Macedon, N.Y.--Fi-
nance & Planning Manager, BS Bus.
Ad., MBA pref. plus 3 yrs. exper. in
cost & financial analysis.
Deere & Co., Moline, II1.-various
openings for recent grads including
accountants, engrs., programmers. Also
1. Physical chemist. PhD for research.
2. Physicisot, PhD, research.
B. F. Goodrich, Akron, Ohio-Sr.
Market Res. Analyst, MBA, exper. in
statistics & econ 8-10 yrs. as mktg.

res. analyst. Age 30-40.
Owens-Illinois Tech. Ctr., Toledo,
Ohio-1. Analytical Chem., MS Chem.,
3-5 yrs. exper. 2. Chem. Engr. BS; dev.
& plant operation exper. 3. Chem. BS
Org. Chem. 0-5 yrs. exper. Many other
tech. job openings also.
* * *
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.

GRALs\9M IXERt

VFW Hall
FRIDAY, JULY 23
9-12 P.M.
One Dollar Donation

314 E. Liberty

Stag or Drag
Refreshments

TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following schools have vacancies
for fall:
Howe, Ind. (Howe Military Academy)
-H.S. Math.
Dearborn Hts., Mich. (Crestwood) -
H.S. Spanish, J.H. Vocal Music.
* * *
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, Educ. Div.,
3200 SAB. 764-7462.

AIDEN MIESEN'S BAND
Sponsored by Graduate Student Council

ENCORE PROGRAM OF
TWIN CLASSICS!

TODAY
3rd Luncheon Book Discussion
THE PHENOMENON OF MAN
by Teilhard de Chardin, S.J.
SR. ZOE BARRY, O.S.B., will speak in the 3rd of this series.
She is a Ph.D. candidate in Comparative Literature at the U. of M.
12:00 Noon-Michigan Union, Anderson Room D
DISCUSSION-FREE OF CHARGE
(Luncheon available: 50c)
Sponsored by the Office of Religious Affairs,
The University of Michigap
Next Tuesday: "Purposes of the University:
The University and International Politics"
by Prof. William Gamsbn

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