100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 16, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-07-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


FRIDAY, JULY 16, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DATIX

FRIDY, JLY 6, 165 1lE ICUi l LhiLLy

YAlib THREE~

'

Greek Government Faces Crisis;
To Hold New General Elections

By The Associated Press mored that the visit would be to
ATHENS-Pushing Greece into hold consultation with Papandreou
a major crisis, King Constantine over the issue of purging officers
yesterday swore Parliament Presi- dabbling in politics from the arm-
dent George Athenasiades-Novas ed forces.
in as premier before Premier Reason for Selection
George Papandreou had officially A government source said King
quit his post. Constantine chose Athenasiades-
This will lead to new national Novas for Papandreou's substitute
elections with the major issue be- because he felt him to be in the
ing how much power the throne most neutral position possible on
should wield in politics. No date the issue of purging the army be-
has been set yet for the election. cause of his position in Parlia-
Papandreou and the king had dif- ment.
fered on this question during the Response to King Constantine's
king's reign. action was immediate. Thousands
The monarch flew in from Cor- of students demonstrated in the
fu, where his summer palace was streets of Athens and supporters
located, to swear in Athenasiades- of Papandreou, who had infuriated
Novas. Previously it had been ru- the king by threatening to purge
Communist Parties Shift
Toward China, Report Says
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-China is gaining increasing support from Com-
munist parties in non-Communist nations a recent government survey
reports.
In, addition the report also indicated that the size of the
Communist parties on a international level had grown from 43 million
to 44.5 million, a growth of about four per cent during the year.
By the end of January, 1964, Communist parties in four nations
-Indonesia, India, Japan and New Zealand-showed strong pro-

the armed forces, labeled the act
a coup d'etat.
The king's sudden move-un-
precedented in modern Greek his-
tory-seemed to stun Papandreou.
On Alert
Reliable sources said all army
and police units in Athens were on
the alert for violence.
The dispute between Papan-
dreou and the king started when
Constantine, as commander-in-
chief of the armed forces, opposed
a purge of army officers partici-
pating in politics. Supporting him
was Minister of Defense Peter
Garoufalias.
Papandreou succeeded in obtain-
ing approval for the ouster of
Garoufalias from the party Mon-
day in a 45 minute cabinet meet-
ing.
Hours After
Hours after the cabinet meet-
ing, Garoufalias gave no indica-
tion that he was ready to step
down and informants said he ap-
parently had no intention of re-
signing.
When Papandreou demanded
that Garoufalias leave the cabinet
over the issue, he refused and
countered that Papandreou was
undermining the armed forces by
tolerating Communist infiltration.
The king at that point was
placed in the position of signing
a royal decree ousting Garoufalias
from his post as defense minister
or refusing to sign it and let the
government itself resign.
Constantine Sided
Constantine, in this case, sided
with Garoufalias.
As far as the coming general
elections are concerned, Papan-
dreou is reported confident of vic-
tory. In the last election in Febru-
ary, 1964, he won an overwhelm-
ing victory over the Rightest Na-
tional Radical Union that had
been in power almost a decade.
King Constantine, who is the
world's youngest monarch, ascend-
ed the throne only 17 months
ago. This will be the first crisis
that it has faced since he took
office.

HELPING HAND:
Racial Trouble-Shooter
Sent To Help Bogalusa
By The Associated Press
BOGALUSA, La.-Asst. Atty. Gen. John Doar left for Bogalusa
yesterday under orders to take an on-the-spot look at Bogalusa's racial
problems while Lee White, presidential adviser, worked on the problem
from Washington.
Doar's role in Bogalusa will be that of extending a helping hand,
White House press secretary Bill Moyes explained.
The White House responded to appeals for aid from both city
officials and Negro leaders in Bogalusa following Gov. John McKeith-
en's failure to achieve peace. Mayor Jesse H. Cutrer Jr., in a tele-
gram Wednesday, asked President. Lyndon B. Johnson to use his
influence to assist a city that is

World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
LONDON-The House of Com-
mons last night passed the Labor
government's finance bill, the
most complicated and revolution-
ary package of British tax re-
forms in half a century. The gov-
ernment's majority was six votes.
* * *
WASHINGTON - The Soviet
government accepted the date of
July 27 for reopening 17-nation
disarmament talks in Geneva, a
spokesman for the United States
Arms Controls and Disarmament
Agency said yesterday.
* * *
,WASHINGTON-Gardner Ack-
ley, chairman of the President's
Council of Economic Advisers,
said yesterday the United States
will meet-and probably surpass
-the forecast of a $660 billion
Gross National Product for 1965.
* * *
WASHINGTON-President Lyn-
don B. Johnson got an optimistic
report yesterday on the state of
the nation's economy, and asked
his advisers to work out proposals
aimed at expanding consumer
purchasing power to keep pace
with mounting production.

being unfairly attacked.
Asks Appointment
And A. Z. Young, president of
the Negro Bogalusa Civic and
Voters League, asked for a White
House appointment for next week.
Doar is credited with helping
clear the way for the Selma-to-
Montgomery voting rights march
and has acted as attorney at a
preliminary hearing for 17 per-
sons accused in the slaying of
three civil rights workers at Phila-
delphia, Miss.
McKeithen had appealed to the
Voters League officials to suspend
demonstrations on Friday.
An uneasy truce was reached at
that time and civil rights leaders
demanded the mayor provide jobs
at the Crown-Zellerbach Corp. pa-
permill in Bogalusa, charging the
mill with race discrimination.
Bogalusa officials called the
demands "impossible" and said
that demands should be made di-
rectly to the mill.
Daily Demonstration
Since that time civil rights lead-
ers have demonstrated almost
daily. Yesterday 400 Negroes pray-
ed at the city hall for three min-
utes. There were no incidents of
violence this time.
In the past the drive for equal
job opportunities for Negroes and
desegregation of public facilities
has been marred by violence, in-
luding the terrorist killing of the
first Negro deputy sheriff from
Washington Parish and the
wounding of a white heckler.

-Associated Press

GOOD NEWS FROM MARINER 4

Three top scientists involved in yesterday's attempt by Mariner 4 to make pictures of Mars study
figures at the communications control center at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.,
after the spacecraft flashed back confirmation that it had "looked" onto the planet. The Mariner 4
started sending back signals containing the record of the pictures it had taken this morning. Last
evening it was believed that the photographic mission of the Mariner 4 experiments (See Page 1 for
Story) had failed because conflicting signals, one indicating that the tape recorder had completed
its cycle correctly and the other indicating the contrary were received. Scientists analyzing the re-
sults are Jack N. James, assistant laboratory directory for lunar and planetary projects; W. A.
Collier, assistant Mariner project manager; Dan Schneiderman, Mariner project manager.
ACTION ON THREE MEASURES:
Senate Passes Housing Bill

Across
Campus
FRIDAY, JULY 16
1:30 p.m.. - The Audio-Visual
Education Center will present a
film preview, "The Hound That
Thought He Was a Raccoon" in
the Multipurpose Rm. of the
UGLI.
7:00 and 9:00 p.m. - The
Cinema Guild will present Char-
lie Chaplin in "City Lights" at
the Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The University Play-
ers will present the Department
of Speech production of T. S.
Elioys "The Confidential Clerk"
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.

Chinese tendencies, the report
said.
Open Split
Pro Chinese parties were also
formed in nine other nations after
an open split with the parent
Communist organization. This oc-
curred in nine nations. And bitter
factional struggles are reported
between pro-Soviet and pro-
Chinese elements if parties in six
other nations.
The survey cautioned, however,
that the alignment of Communist
parties in the Sino-Soviet dispute
is subject to rapid changes and
some of the evidence of alignment
is ambiguous.
The report, dealing with Com-
munist parties in 90 countries,
also said the four per cent growth
rate might be insignificant be-
cause it appeared to be the result
of an "upward revision" of mem-
bership figures in three key par-
ties. The Indonesian party, largest
of the "out-of-power" parties,
claims an increase of 100 thou-
sand members.
Only 10 Per Cent
The Communist parties of coun-
tries account to only 10 per cent
of the total of 44.5 million. Out of
the 4.3 million card-carrying
members outside the bloc, 75 per
cent are divided between Indo-
nesia with two million members
and Italy with 1.4 million mem-
bers. The third most important
country in this group is France
with 260 thousand Communists.
The 14 parties in the Com-
munist states-including Cuba and
Yugoslavia-account for 90 per
cent of the world membership,
with 40.2 million.

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Senate
passed, by a vote of 54 to 30, a
$7.5 billion housing bill last night
after voting down Republican ef-
forts to knock out or reduce dras-
tically a new program of rent
subsidies for low-income families.
The bill includes most of the
provisions asked by President Lyn-
don B. Johnson by both the Sen-

ate and the House.j
However, although Senate lead-
ers warded off two attacks on the
bill, administration forces them-
selves cut the maximum expen-
diture to $350 million. The orig-
inal bill called for a $500 million
authorization.

Reject Recommendation
Both houses also rejected
recommendation for a package

a
of

. . . .'.. . ..J...- . ... . .. ". . .'- . ....rn ., .....-«. .. .. "-.. .. :: :. . V..AV * " . ...Y...... \... . . . . . .. .. .... 1....^.. S .K. '... .t .. . r".... ..A A,.,KK... ......"1" r........ t.... ... . . ...
..A . ...Y.. .............. "...............4.:...... .. .......A........ ................ . ............ ......q" : ,"t :.1L.... }.... . . {. K l
' . . .. . . . .r . .... ..{ ......t . .J....r...... .....> ........ . . . . .K.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .".. ..S> .... . .....-..t.t'> !... . . . . . . .... . . "4 1Y }.-1 .".M1....K " 1:4 J:C: «.....-..,. . . .Y :.. .W :.... . .l
DIY. . .. ... ..OFI A .. ..., ..-.... . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . ..-« .: '" ar st K' .K : x v;. .'. . ."c. .. .V:^ K . V . . ..KY" K . .l 1 "Y y w "
. . . . . . .... ...t......{ ..............t,,....},,1....V ... .. . ... . ... .... A ..... . ... . . . .... ......... ........ ........ .. . .. ... . A.t. .i:...fi .V..1L.. ,,"n+ { ,".... . ... .

8:30 p.m. -Raymond
oboist, will perform in a
of Music degree recital in
Hall.

Lynch,
School
Recital

I

Use
Daily
assified

CI

Ads

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
FRIDAY, JULY 16
Day Calendar
Community College Leadership Pro-
gram Junior College President's Insti-
tute - Vandenberg Room, Michigan
League, 8:30 a.m.
Engineering Summer Conference-H.
Buning, D. T. Greenwood, co-chairmen,
"Flight Mechanics of Spacecraft": 1042
East Engineering, 8:30 a.m.
Student Adviser's Workshop-Regis-
tration, Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Leadership Training Workshop-Union
Ballroom, 9 a.m.
Audio-Visual Education Center Film
Preview-"The Hound thatThought He
Was a Raccoon": Multipurpose Room,
Undergraduate Library, 1:30 p.m.

Cinema Guild-Charlie Chaplin in
"City Lights": Architecture Aud., 7 and
9 p.m.
Dept. of Speech University Players
Production-T. S. Eliot's "The Confiden-
tial Clerk": Mendelssohn Theatre, 8
p.m.
Dept. of Astronomy Visitors' Night-
William P. Bidelman, Department of
Astronomy, "The How and Why of
Stellar Spectroscopy." To observe star
cluster and double star: Aud. D, Angell
Hall, 8:30 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital-Ray-
mond Lynch, oboist: Recital Hall,
School of Music, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
August Teacher's Certificate Candi-
ORGA N IZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
* * *
Folk Dance Club, Folk dancing with
instruction, Fri., July 16, 8-11 p.m.,
Women's Athletic Bldg.
* * *
Lutheran Student Chapel, Speaker,
The Rev. Hubert Locke, member of the
Citizens Committee of Equal Oppor-
tunity, Detroit, "The Christian in the
Midst of Urban Tensions," Sun., July
18, 7 p.m., Student Chapel, Hill and
Forest Ave.

dates: All requirements for the teach-
er's certificate must be completed by
Aug. 2. These requirements include the
teacher's oath, health statement, so-
cial security number, and Bureau of
kppointments material. The oath should
be taken as soon as possible in Room
1431 University School. The office is
open from 8-12 and 1-5, Monday
through Friday.
Doctoral Examination for Ernst
Friedrich Mueller, Social Psychology;
thesis: "Psychological and Physiological
Correlates of Work Overload among
University,\ Professors." Fri., July 16,
Conference Room, ISR, 4 p.m. Co-
Chairmen J. R. P. French and S. V.
Kasl.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Guaranty Federal Savings, Wyandotte,
Mich.-Young man, degree in bus. ad.
with bkgd. in acctg. or banking pref.
Hudson Institute, Harmon-on-Hudson,
N.Y,-Research position for grad with
adv. degree in econ. Assist in long range
studies in national security & interna-
tional order.
Mgmt. Consultants, N.Y.C.-Manager
of Labor Relations. LL.B. pref. or thor-
ough knowledge of labor law. 7-10 yrs.
exper. in labor rel. activities. Plant
personnel exper. helpful. Some travel.
Schlitz Brewing Co., Milwaukee, Wis.
-1. Programmer analyst. Conduct O.R.
studies. Programming proficiency in
Fortran pref. 2. Mkt. Res. Project Supv.
Knokledge & exper. to handle res.
des., methodology, sample des., etc. on
house & res. agency studies.
County of Santa Clara, Calif.-Park
Planner. BS in city & regional planning
landscape arch., engr. or rel. plus 2
yrs. prof. exper. or MS & one yr. ex-
per. 2. Ass't. Sup't. of Parks, major in
park mgmt., recreation, engrg. or rel.
plus 3 yrs. exper.

For further information, please
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of
pointments, 3200 SAB.

U

call
Ap-

INDIAN BEDSPREADS
printed and hand-woven
NUMDAH RUGS
white and colored
WOODB LOCK PRINTS

OVERSEAS PLACEMENT:
EDUCATION DIVISION-
The Defense Department dependent's
schools overseas have teacher vacan-
cies at the secondary and primary
levels located in the following areas:
England, Azores, Labrador, Okinawa,
Midway, Libya, Bermuda, Japan, Cuba,
Turkey,- Newfoundland, Philippines, &
Korea.
Teachers meeting the following mini-
mum requirements should contact:
Marjorie Fuller, Overseas Placement
Officer, Civilian Personnel Office, Self-
ridge AFB, Mich. 48046. Phone: 465-1241,
ext. 24218.
18 hrs. in education.
Degree with bkgd. in field or fields
for which applying.
2 yrs. exper. as teacher, counselor,
librarian, or admin. between Sept. 1960
and -une 1965-1 yr. at grade level in
fields to be taught.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB,
764-7462.
DIAL 8-6416
ENCORE PROGRAM OF
TWIN CLASSICS!
MARCELL.
Mastroianni
Divorce
I talian
Style
AND
JOSE LF1E' _
YEsmnDj TODAY
IbMOlIROW COL.

Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Application for these jobs
can be made in the Part-Time Em-
ployment Office, 2200 SAB, during the
following hours: Monday through Fri-
day, 8 a.m. until 12 noon and 1:30
until 5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring stu-
dents for part-time or full-time tem-
porary work, should contact Robert
Parker, part-time interviewer, at 764-
7283.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
fobs should consult the bulletin
board in Room 2200, daily.
There are several part-time perma-
nent positions available for typist-clerks
and secretaries. While shorthand is not
required for all positions, good typing
is a necessity. Since these positions are
available immediately, those interested
should apply at once.

I

aids to help in the development
of new towns in metropolitan
areas around cities.
The rent, subsidy program is
designed to aid the lowest income
families now eligible for public
housing. It also contains funds
and new authorizations to con-
tinue urban renewal, public hous-
ing and many other programs al-
ready in existence.
The Senate also sent a bill to
Johnson yesterday which would
eliminate all silver from dimes
and quarters and cut the silver
content in half dollars from 90
to 40 per cent.
Final Product
The final product carries out
Johnson's recommendations, sub-
mitted to Congress last month,
thus assuring his signing it.
Johnson also signed a bill
which would regulate the sale of
goofbails and pep pills. He called
it another step in the attack on
crime.
The new law is aimed at stop-
ping the illicit use of stimulant
and depressant drugs, among
them barbituates and amphe-
tamines. The bill gives the gov-
ernment stronger controls over
their distribution.
In Tradition
Johnson explained that this bill
was in the tradition of government
protection in providing safe and
effective drugs.
He noted that if used properly,
the drugs can be a great boon.

T HE NEW
OnCARPENTER RAD
OPEN 7:30
" THE AREA'S FINEST *
DRIVE IN THEATRE
NOW SHOWING
L OiRL
J
"" .
"''N
NOREEN MARTIN
CORCORAN WST TE C
Shown at 8:35 & Late
ALSO SEE

E L
I
I CINEMA GUILD.I
I y
I
"
I U
CHARLIE CHAPLIN!
II
I I
I I
I U
i ,
1g
I !'
Ig
I
I I
I
" I
Short: The Persistent Seed
"
* FRIDAY & SATURDAY AT 7 & 9 P.M.
I L
TlI I
I 7
I U
I
IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM w
1 I
ADMISSION: FIFTY CENTS
I I
" I
fa siUM W s i i i ii

I

I

Want to see a funny play?
THE DOCTOR IN SPITE OF HIMSELF
When's the fun begin?
8:00 P.M. July 21-24
Where's the nicest theatre in the state?
I I l 4. .~ .IN UII _II I

I

I

I

I

i , . .:2 l

11

11

SIII

11

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan