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July 09, 1965 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-07-09

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Seventy-Fifth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

An Alternative

To Defeat in Asia

Where Opinions Are Free, 420 MAYNARD ST., ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Truth Will Prevail

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552

Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.
FRIDAY, JULY 9, 1965 NIGHT EDITOR: BARBARA SEYFRIED
Cutler's Reorganization:
Students Can Nvow Help Selves

By WALTER LIPPMANN
THE PRESIDENT must often
feel that heis between the
devil and the deep blue sea-be-
tween the devil of unlimited war
and the deep blue sea of defeat.
The dilemma is a cruel one, and
for some time now, since the re-
jection in April of his offer to
negotiate, he has had no policy for
winning the war and only a specu-
lative hope as to how to bring it
to a decent end.
He has hoped that a military
stalemate would produce an ac-
ceptable negotiated settlement.
Our present objective is to stave
off military defeat in the South
and to soften up the North by
limited bombing.
By autumn we ought to know
whether the current administra-
tion strategy is based on a true
estimate of the state of the war
or whether it is, as some of us
fear, a device for putting off the
evil day of having to decide be-
tween unpleasant alternatives.
IF the current strategy is suc-
cessful, it will be a most happy
surprise. If, by the autumn, Hanoi
with Peking's consent agrees to
negotiate at all, it will at least
meantthat there is a pause in the
relentless movement toward a
larger war.

But there will still remain the
very great question of whether
the Viet Cong and Hanoi and
China will agree to any settlement
which bears some recognizable
resemblance to the objective of
an independent South Viet Nam
which the President and Secre-
tary of State Dean Rusk have
been talking about.
Were this to become possible in
the autumn, it would be a mir-
acle. For we would have snatched
a moral victory from the jaws of
a military defeat. It seems most
unlikely that it will happen.
IT IS UNLIKELY that the Viet
Cong will be ready to quit if it
does not win a military victory
during this monsoon season. The
Viet Cong and its allies have been
at war for 20 years, and there is
no reason to suppose that they
are not prepared to go on for
many more monsoon seasons.
As for inducing North Viet Nam
to pull back, it is significant, as
we know from Secretary Rusk,
that Hanoi has thus far refused
even to talk about some kind of
cease-fire in return for a cessa-
tion of the bombing,
It looks as if Hanoi has taken
into account that it will probably
be bombed, has discounted its
losses in advance and isuprepared
to commit its formidable army to

the war. From their point of view
the stakes are very high.
IF THE HOPE of a stalemate to
be followed by the negotiation of
an agreeable settlement fades out,
the President's Republican critics
will demand that he win the war
by devastating North Viet Nam.
The Republican activists, Reps.
Gerald Ford and Melvin Laird,
have taken up where Barry Gold-
water left off, that is with the
simpleminded notion that this
war, and virtually any other war,
can be won by bombers.
It will not be easy, however, for
the President to refuse to try
strategic bombing. For if he holds
back he has no way of proving
that the policy will not work. This
will be especially awkward if large
numbers of American infantry-
men are bogged down in South
Viet Nam. The evil consequences
of unlimited bombing upon the
whole international situation
would not be visible until the
policy is undertaken.
IN ORDER to resist the Repub-
lican attack and satisfy our deep-
est interests, the President will
need, I think, to make a decisive
change of policy.
Henneeds a new policy which
will override the debate about

"victory," or "withdrawal," and
will make feasible his hope of an
eventual negotiated settlement.
The new policy would have to
be, it seems to me, a pull-back of
our forces from the defense of
villages and small towns to one
or more highly fortified strong
points with certain access to the
sea and then to advise Saigon that
it should seek to make peace with
the Viet Cong and with North
Viet Nam:
THIS WOULD NOT be a with-
drawal from Southeast Asia, such
as Sen. Wayne Morse has been
advocating, for the American
presence would remain, providing
a sanctuary against the persecu-
tion of our friends and a basis of
influence while a new order of
things in Asia is being negotiated.
There would not be much glory
in such a strategic retreat. But it
would not be a surrender. It would
be honest and honorable; since it
would be feasible, it would be
credible.
It would extricate us from a war
that cannot be won at any toler-
able cost; it would disentangle us
from a political commitment that
is grossly. overextended and leave
us with the possibility of playing
a significant part in the eventual
settlement with China.
(c) 1965, The Washington Post Co.

VICE-PRESIDENT for Student. Affairs
Richard Cutler announced a reorgani-
zation in his Office of Student Affairs last
Thursday. Immediate speculation on the
OSA's future role on campus has unfor-
tunately obscured the crucial element in
Cutler's renovation, an element which
was probably a moving force behind the
entire change.
That element is the unparalleled and
compelling opportunities which the
changes afford student activities at the
University.
Earlier, Cutler has implied quite strict
goals for student activities; now he has
created an OSA adequately organized to
promote those goals.
IN THE FIRST PLACE, the reorganiza-
tion makes Cutler what his title says
but what his situation had earlier pre-
vented him from becoming: a vice-presi-
dent. It is a simple fact of life that a man
cannot operate successfully as a vice-
president of the University if he has a di-
rect finger in as many diverse pies as
Cutler had, ranging from the residence
halls to Student Government Council.
And so the first thing the reorganiza-
tion has done is to remove Cutler from
direct contact with these many diverse
interests. In this sense the reorganiza-
tion has elevated him from direct contact

gotten lost somewhere between quad li-
brary censorship and the tuition hike can
now be given the attention they deserve.
The point is that this is a two-way
street. Cutler's invitation must be accept-
ed by student leaders before it can be
meaningful.
IN THE SECOND PLACE, the reorgani-
zation reflects the fact that one man
can neither know everything nor be
everywhere.
The creation of nine separate subdivi-
sions of the OSA, basically clearing-
houses for Cutler's nine most permanent
preoccupations, could possibly be criticiz-
ed in its details, but must be praised for
the opportunities it gives students.
Now nine experts in their fields, rath-
er than one harried executive, can discuss
the students' problems and those of their
organizations. Certainly there are some
problems which will have to be taken to
Cutler; but with the proper delegation of
authority, these should be few. In essence,
what Cutler has done is to give students
and student activities a great chance to
obtain aid and advice from a formerly
burdensome OSA.
OF COURSE the proper warnings are in
order; it's a beautiful plan, but then
"the best laid plans of mice and men ..."
A great potential stumbling block would
be the insufficient assumption of author-
ity by the heads of the nine divisions. If
Cutler doesn't give them the freedom they
need, or if they are unable to assume that
freedom, they will become little more than
secretaries.
Or if the sudden urge toward more ef-
ficient organization should lead Cutler
and/or his assistants on a spree to cen-
tralize student activities under the wing
of the OSA, results could again be dis-
astrous.
But both these possibilities are based on
the unlikely assumption of great mistakes
on the parts of men who, at least insofar
as this plan is concerned, don't seem to
have made many.
BY FAR THE GREATEST danger Cut-
ler's plan faces lies in the hands of the
students themselves. This danger points
up the really key prbolems any OSA will
have no matter what its organization:
that no matter what it does most of its
efforts will be permissive rather than
compulsive. You can lead a student to an
opportunity, but you can't make him take
advantage of it.
This is why it is so vitally important
for students to take advantage of these
opportunities. It is not unfair to say that
every student organization on this cam-
pus has important problems in member-
ship, goals, activities or real purpose.
There is no reason why Cutler and his
trouble-shooters should not be deluged
with them. For they cannot realistically
be expected to stand idly by while a large
investment and a great potential like a
student organization gos down the drain,
no matter what the reason.
Student organizations should not be
given assistance in spite of themselves,
but rather because of their own efforts.
If they do otherwise, they will cease to
meaningfully remain student organiza-
tions and will render useless an OSA with
so much potential.
-LEONARD PRATT

SAIGON must negotiate with
the Viet Cong and President Ho
Chi Minh of North Viet Nam
(above).

4

EDUCATION PROGRAMS:
Needed--Some Coordination

Rep. Ford-Playing Politics with War
Rep. Gerald Ford:
Our Pride and Joy

VICE-PRESIDENT RICHARD CUTLER
with the students. At first such an eleva-
tion might seem to remove Cutler from
the realm of student interests, but no
one should be deceived by the lengthening
pf the line on University organizational
charts leading to Cutler's name. In fact,
he has left himself with more spare time
in which to talk to students and research
their problems, activities with which he
is certainly deeply concerned.
. This is the first change which student
organizations must be certain to capitalize
on. It is almost as if Cutler had invited
student groups in for a chat. Long-
range difficulties which before would have
JUDITH WARREN........................Co-Editor
ROBERT !HIPLER.............Co-Editor
EDWARD HERS'I EIN..................Sports Editor
JUDITH FI ELDS............. . Business Manager
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor. Mich.
Published daily Tuesday thruugh Saturday morning.

By GEORGE ABBOTT WHITE
IF GERALD R. FORD were a
butcher, his recent statements
on Viet Nam could be regarded as
merely comic. Unfortunately, he
is House Minority Leader in this
nation's Congress and as such, his
words mean a great deal more.
We are told that the function
of the Minority in Congress is
analogous to the "out" parties in
Britain; to provide loyal and re-
sponsiblebopposition. Mr. Ford
fails on both counts.
What he is loyal to is his own
sense of messianic power: he be-
lieves the UnitedRStates and more
particularly, the Republican Party,
even more specifically, Gerald F.
Ford, the divinely-ordained savior
of the earth. Mr. Ford and his
sharp logic will triumph over evil.
Mr. Ford, with the aid of nuclear
weapons and "hard resolve" will
clear the "dirty Communists" out
of Viet Nam and make the earth
safe for more "Diemocracy."
WHAT HE IS actually respon-
sible to is anyone's guess. Certain-
ly not reason. How can any "rea-
sonable" man consider the missiles
ringing Hanoi "offensive?" Unless
of course, he means offensive to
the United States; that they could
possibly shoot down any U.S. plane
that attempts to bomb Hanoi's
people.
Mr. Ford adds "it is possible to
do it without bombing or destroy-
ing nonmilitary targets." For such
defenses (clever Reds!) are a

"threat to the security of U.S.
forces in Viet Nam."
WHAT MR FORD and the other
war mongers inside and outside
Washington are after is clear:
President Johnson is in an obvious
bind; he is losing the war. Rather
than be loyal to American ideals
and responsible to a reasonable
perception of reality-Viet Nam
reality-Mr. Ford would rather
make political hay and the going
tougher for the Democrats.
"It's their war," so the reason-
ing goes. We tell them to either
win it or get out. More defini-
tions: "Winning" in Mr. Ford's
mind means nothing less than the
optional use of nuclear weapons.
Which means that the U.S. has
the ignoble chance of repeating
history and dropping, a second
time, such bombs on nonwhites.
Which means the U.S. and the
Democrats wouldreap the scorn
and abuse of the entire earth.
"Losing" would mean negotia-
tion or getting out. This, by def-
inition, proves Mr. Goldwater's
point: the U.S. and the Democrats
have gone soft on Communism.
WE ARE TOLD the hottest
places in hell are reserved for
those who hesitate in times of
crisis. I would suggest we expand
the criteria to include govern-
mental officials who work for
political advantages while nuclear
holocast becomes more and more
"thinkable."

E DUCATION has come to be big
business in Washington.
If the administration's new pro-
grams make it through this ses-
sion of Congress unscathed, as
they seem likely to, the total of
federal aid to education will jump
to $8.6 billion for the coming
fiscal ,year.
This is nearly a 37 per cent in-
crease over last year's appropria-
tions.
MANY PERSONS are not en-
tirely happy with this. They see
it as meaning mounting federal
control of education. But the fact
is that the state and local gov-
ernments are no longer able to
pick up the whole bill of school
costs.
Enrollments are rising sharply
at all levels-in the colleges and
universities as well as in elemen-
tary and secondary schools.
This is particularly true in the
institutions of higher learning,
where federal aid is necessary to
support needed expansion, both on
the physical level and in the grow-
ing fields of research.
BUT THE DANGER of a giant
federal monolith assuming control
of our educational system is yet
a remote fear. Jonathon Spivak,
writing on "Education's Muddled
Bureaucracy" in a recent issue of
The Reporter, points out a more
current problem.
The people.on Capitol Hill are
not so worried about having too
much power, he says, but are con-
cerned with knowing exactly who
has the power. As too often hap-
pens in any governmental struc-
ture, administration of legislated
programs ends up scattered among
a dozen different agencies.
Thus, instead of coordinating
together toward a single goal,
authority is divided, and duplica-
tion and waste sometimes result.
THIS IS the case with federal
education programming.
The largest single share of fed-
eral money, about $1.5 billion next
yeai, is administered by the Office
of Education, a unit of the De-
partment of Health, Education and
Welfare.
But a dozen or so other agencies
also make big contributions. And
they are often in conflict with
each other's policies.
FOR EXAMPLE, both the Na-
tional Aeronautics and Space Ad-
ministration and the National
Science Foundation give fellow-
ships for graduate study in the
sciences.
NASA provides grants of $2,400
a year for the student, while it
gives the university a negotiated
matching fund which averages
$2,700 a year per student.
The NSF student grants in-
crease gradually from $2,400 to
$2,800 a year per student for a
three-year period. But the school's
allowance in this case has a ceil-
ing of $2,500 per year.
THIS KIND of conflict and
inter-agency disagreement on
policy makes for a kind of un-
desirable competition.
And NSF's growing support of
the humanities, as well as the
sciences, could lead to a situation
in which two or more agencies are
competing for the same graduate
students.
THIS KIND of bickering within
the separate bodies will only get
worse if the government does not
delineate authority more specifi-
cally.
Sen. Abraham Ribicoff (D-
Conn) has recommended that a

'She' Is All Right,
But the Lads Lose
At the State Theatre
OH, AND ITS DOUBLE FEATURE time again 'in Ann Arbor. In
this case a mismatched alignment, "Hercules, Samson and Ulysses,"
And "She."
The first is a rottenpotboiler from Italy 'with silly dubbing,
inadequate technical work and one of the most hysterical plots of
that whole muscular series that Steve Reeves began. This time the
girls aren't even cute much less spectacular, nor is the action par-
ticularly bloody. All round, the lads are losers.
Then there is "She," from the H. Rider Haggard novel and
starring the sultry Ursula Andress in the Title role. It is here the
problem arises.
"SHE" isn't a bad little movie for its genre. It's action is swift,
and in respect to its underlying assumptions of fantasy and adventure,
the plot is quite legitimate and consistent. The acting is good, the
camera work excellent.
Above all, Miss Andress quite easily conveys the mystery and
strange fascination that "She" must have, as well as the powerful
physical allurement upon which the plot rests.
John Richardson, the re-incarnated High Priest, is also physically
correct. Between the two the credibility of the plot gains a great
deal of strength.
BUT PAIRING an ignoble Italian idiocy (Hercules, etc.) with
"She" does the latter movie a great injustice.
One expects either a great deal more, a Bond-like film or, a great,
deal less, another epic hash. As a result the good, solid, if unambitious,
quality of "She" is completely lost and destroyed.
If you can manage to go and see just "She" and skip the
Terrible trite trio, you might enjoy yourself. If, however, you have
to take it all, hold on till the next double feaure arrives . . . its .
"bond" to be better.
-HUGH HOLLAND

vard President James Conant,
have said that a department of
education might duplicate too
many functions of present
agencies.
The most resonable solution is
already being implemented. Last
year Francis Keppel, commission
of the the Office of Education,
created an Interagency Commit-
tee on Education.
THIS SEEMS the most optimis-
tic plan toward developing more
coordination of federal education
efforts. Keppel hasdone much to
clear out the deadwood that
bogged down the efforts of his
predecessors. It is only hoped that
his new committee will not also
suffer from the same internal
squabbling that made its creation
necessary.
-OREGON DAILY EMERALD
DOUBLE FEATURE:

SEN. ABRAHAM RIBICOFF

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