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May 07, 1965 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-05-07

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FRIDAY, MaPlk Y' 7, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FXVX

FRIDAY, MAY '7, 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVi

BEYOND NASSER:
Arabs Learn Political Realism

G

r'

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 764-0557
from 1:00 to 3:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, and Saturday 10:00 'til 11:30 A.M.

I

*1

i

By LEONARD PRATT
MISIANPRESIDENT Habib
Bourgiba accused United Arab
Republic President Gamal Abdel
Nasser last Sunday of trying to
"exercise an exclusive leadership
of the Arab world in such a way
as to appear uncontested master
of its destinies, with all the ad-
vantages that would bring."
This charge, which would have
been unheard of any .other time
in the last year and a half, pro-
vides a convenient historical wat-
ershed for observing the new
" splits that are occurring in the
Arab bloc:
THE HISTORY of the Middle
Eastern world has always been
fluid; ,appenings since World
War II exemplify this. Russia has
historically been interested in
controlling areas in the "fertile
crescent" to protect its otherwise
undefended southern boarders.
But it was never given an op-
portunity to establish really pow-
erful influences in the Middle East
until the Second World War,
when, since it was an ally of Eng-
land, these countries permitted1
her to establish relations with
them.z
After the war, Russia expected1
the weakened British power in the
East to collapse, leaving a vacuum1
for the Communists to fill. Butt
continued British strength anda
-,*,renewed American interest stayedr
the Russian hand in the attempt-
ed Persian takeover in 1946. Per-1
sian failure led to a change in,
Russian tactics from overt take-
over to covert support of nations
favorable to Communism.y
IN THIS light, the Egyptian
revolution in 1953 offered the3
Russians an excellent chance to1
obtain the power in the Middle
East which they wanted. When,
the United States, offended at
Egyptian recognition of Commun-
ist China in 1956, took back its aid
offer for the Aswan High Dam,
the time was ripe for Russia to
step into Egyptian affairs in grand
style.
Backed by Communist power,,
Nasser set about to create a uni-;
fled Arab state, the United Arab;
Republic, with himself at its head.;
He: got his wish in 1958, but his
troubles were far from over. It
took Nasser another five years to
finally whip the Arab bloc into
some semblance of unity. This
semblance appeared to be real-
until some two weeks ago when
the underlying diversities in what
Nasser had tried to paint as a
unified Arab world made them-
selves -felt.
ALL THROUGH the struggle
for Arab unity, the key Nasser
rallying point has been Israel,
and so it was quite unexpected
that the real signs of diversity
would also appear over Israel.
When West Germany recently in-
dicated it would soon recognize
Israel, Nasser rightfully saw a
threat to his key argument for
holding the Arab bloc together,
the illegitimacy of Israel. But Nas-
,ser made his mistake when he

THE POLITICS OF THE MIDDLE east are reaching maturity as
several national leaders are seeking to break away from the
charismatic leadership of Egypt's President Nasser (above).

tried to ask all Arab states to
completely break with West Ger-
many in reprisal for the recogni-1
tion.
Such a break would mean com-1
plete economic disaster for manyl
of the Arab states. This is because
most of them are "primary pro-l
ducers," that is, they produce
mostly raw materials in contrast
to finished industrial goods. Be-
cause of this, they do little trading
with one another; there is little
point in trading, say, cotton for.
more cotton in return.
Most Arab trade is with the in-
dustrial nations of Europe who
need raw materials and can give
them finished goods in exchange.;
Thus a break with West Germany
would have been , break with a
major market, as far as most Arab
nations were concerned.
TUNISIAN President Bourgiba
must have felt himself impelled to
disagree with Nasser on primarily
economic grounds, but he suc-
ceeded far beyond what he had
any right to expect. For nation
after nation refused to back Nas-
ser on his European gambit. Far
from being ostracized, Bourgiba
found himself the leader of a
movement.
All this implies that there have
been other factors mitigating
against Arab unity, and this is'
certainly true. In the first place,
the Arabs are far from the single
people with a common heritage
and destiny that Nasser has been
pretending they are.
Nasser's "Arabs" stretch over
3000 miles from the Atlantic
Ocean to the Caspian Sea. They
have very diverse histories of con-
tact with the West, often a de-
termining factor in relations be-
tween themselves and the West
today. Their national interests are
likewise wide-spread; Morocco
cares as little about Jordan's prob-
lems with Israel as Jordan cares
about Morocco's problems with Al-
gerian tribesmen.

IN THE second place, other
Arab states may believe themselves
to have good reason to be dissatis-
fied with the way they have been
treated by Nasser. All the states
haye several problems in common
-their poor health conditions, il-
literacy, and industrial backward-
ness to name but a few.
But Nasser occupies the center
of the Middle Eastern stage as a
self-pronounced expert on all their
difficulties. To other Arabs, hav-
ing their share of nomadic pride,
Nasser's confidence may often
have spelled impudence.
In addition, there are several
specific issues which have served
to split Nasser from other Arabs.
He is fighting Saudi Arabia in
Yemen, through backing a fac-
tion opposing Arabia's forces in
the civil war there. He has
watched with alarm several Mid-
dle Eastern nations discussing
separate arms agreements with
the West crippling both his wish
for Arab unity and the desires of
his Soviet suppliers.
ALL THESE divisions have
combined with economic pressures
to make Bourgiba the leader of a
group of strange bedfellows buck-
ing Nasser in the Arab bloc. There
are generally recognized five prin-
ciple "objectors." Three-Morocco,
Tunisia and Libya-are the three
separated from Nasser by the
greatest degree physically.
The fourth "objector," Saudi
Arabia, is Nasser's contender for
the leadership of the Arab world.
Its leaders cannot help but feel
second-bested by the Egyptian
leader. This resentment has most
recently manifested itself in the
Yemen dispute; its potential is
evidently enough to let the Arab-
ians dare to tempt Nasser even
farther.
That Jordan should join in Tu-
nisia's support against Egypt on
the West German issue was sur-

prising in that Egypt has always
been Jordan's staunch supporter
in disputes with Israel. Perhaps
the reason for that support was
evident in Bourgiba's next break
with Nasser.
THIS SECOND break was to
declare, in public, that Arab poli-
cies, that is, Nasser's policies, on:
the Israeli question were signi-
ficant failures and to suggest that
negotiations might carry the
Arabs farther than war-at-any-
moment confrontations.3
In this sense, it is easy to see
why Jordan supports Bourgiba,
because it is Jordan who has suf-
fered most greatly at the least
profit from Nasser's absurd Israel
stand. Jordan has been forced to
take a stance of imminent inva-
sion of Israel, knowing that if it
tried it would be beaten as badly
or worse than in 1947. Living
daily with this situation, as Nas-
ser does not, Jordan inevitably is
the first to discover the foolish-
ness of the Arab "party line."
Actually Bourgiba's Israeli
statements, urged on by his suc-
cess on the West German issue,
were two-fold in importance. In
the first place, they were a sig-
nificant departure from the Arab
'party line,' and could provide
an opening for accommodation
between the Arabs and Israel.
BUT HIS suggestions were not1
only important for what they
said; they were most important
in that they were said publicly,
thus shattering the myth of Arab
unity which Nasser had gone to
so much trouble to create.
Thus, they are an important
step toward releasing the Arab
states from their allegiance to
Nasser and toward creating as
many separate national policies in
the middle east as there are na-
tions there.
This move on Bourgiba's part is
an important shift toward politi-
cal realism on the part of major
Arab states. When an Arab leader
can strongly condemn Nasser's
"party line," he shows himself not
to be the sort that can be fool-
ishly led on by the charismatic
leadership Nasser has shown so
far; he shows himself to want
concrete results for his nation,
not just slogans to paste on the
walls.
MOREOVER, when he can ob-
tain support, no matter how tacit,
from other Arab nations for such
a policy, it shows that the seeds
of this political realism are wide-
spread indeed.
The West Germany-Israel issues
indicate that the world may now
expect an awakening of Arab in-
ternational politics from the sleep
of political myth in which they
have lain for so long. Arab leaders
are evidently no longer to toss off
handy slogans; they have become
more sophisticated, more aware of
their potential abilities and dif-
ferences. The dormant Middle
East is seeing the awakening of
political forces which will greatly
increase the complexity of issues
there.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .70 1.95 3.45
3 .85 2.40 4.20
4 1.00 2.85 4.95
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 2:30 doily.
Phone 764-0557
FOR RENT
NO LEASE REQUIRED
Large studio, unfurn., $70/mo., in-
cludes all utilities. Unfurn. 1 bdrm.
apt., $95/mo., all utilities. 663-7268.
C4
ATTRACTIVE, 2 bdrm., large furn.
apt. Piano, garage. Near campus.
Heat, water included. Grad Women
students, married couples preferred.
$150 mo. Call NO 5-4740 or see 1523
S. Univ. C5
REDUCED
CAMPUS-HOSPITAL
1 bdrm. apt. with study. very attrac-
tive, modern furn. Avail, now and
fall. $80 mo. Call NO 5-0925 or NO
2-7992. C3
ROOMS FOR MEN
$20 per month
TV Lounge, Air conditioned
Complete Snack Kitchen
Call 8-9593
C1
FURN. 3 bdrm house, ceramic bath,
fireplace, newly decorated. Hill-
Division area. Summer $180 mo. Fall
$220 mo. Call NO 3-6528. C3
ROOM AND BOARD
CO-OPS are a good place to eat this
summer. Board $11 per wk. Room
& board $17 per week. Join for 1 or
both terms. Contact Intter-Cooper-
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6872. El
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS, AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington

PERSONAL
1335 S. UNIV. No. E must be an awfully
nice place to live, judging from the
number of inhabitants. Hi you guys
from me. F5
RENT YOUR TV from NEJAC
GE and Zenith portables for only $10
per month. FREE service and de-
livery. Phone 662-5671 NOW. F
TO SPINACH and Rabbit-Have no fear,
Peter's here. F4
WAKE UP SERVICE - Have your
phone ring at any designated time-
day or night-LOW RATES, DON'T
BE LATE FOR CLASS OR WORK-
AGAIN. TELEPHONE ANSWERING
SERVICE, 665-8871 (24 hours). F42
HE MAKES THE BIG TIME
Don Pierce gets his name in the paper.
F3
AUSTIN DIAMOND-"The best buy on
an Engagement ring in Ann Arbor."
1209 S. University, 663-7151.
SEE MARK RICHMAN Prestige Party
Favors forrthemost unusual line of
party favors ever assembled by one
company. Office and Show Room at
1103 S. University. NO 2-6362. F
FOR THE FINEST in Dance Music-It's
Johnny Harberd
Art Bartner
Ray Louis
Maximillian
Peter Clements
Wadye Gallant
Contact The Bud-Mor Agency
1103 S. University
NO 2-6362
Meet the Right Person
The purpose of our organization, using
established techniques of personality
appraisal and an IBM system, is to
introduce unmarried persons to'others
with compatible backgrounds, inter-
ests and ideals. Interviews by ap-
pointment. Phone 662-4867.
MICHIGAN SCIENTIFIC
INTRODUCTION SERVICE
HELP! I'M BORED! Want someone to
play bridge with me. If game, call
Judy at 764-0554 during the day. Fl
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
RENT A TRUCK
Pickups, panels, stakes, and vans.
59 Ecorse Rd., Ypsilanti, Mich.
NEW CARS
EUROPEAN CARS, INC.
NEW CARS AND SERVICE
506 E. Michigan, Ypsilanti
HU 2-2175
Washtenaw County's only
authorized V.W. Dealer
'V
MISCELLANEOUS
IT'S STILL pretty early for classes to
have got you down, but treat yourself
to a special study snack anyway.
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
open every night 'til 12

USED CARS
1955 PLYMOUTH, $50. Call 665-0386'
between 6 and 10. N6
'61 VW, GOOD cond. Recent valve and
ringe job. 663-3171 evenings. N5
TR3, 1959 ROADSTER. Red wwhite top.
Tunnel cover, Michelin X tires, very
good cond. Highest offer. 662-6111. N4
TRIUMPH TR-4, 1964 roadster. Clean.
14,500 miles. Never raced. Four on
the floor, wire wheels, radio, heater.
windshield washer. Green, black
top. Racing stripes, seat belts. One
owner. $2500. Can be seen at 523
Neff Road, Grosse Point. Call TU
2-8535 for appointment. N3
ALPHA-1963 Sprint Speciale. One own-
er. Mint condition. Best offer. 3150
Morgan Road. N1
MGB 1964
AM-FM radio. NO 5-4620. N7
MGB '63. Blue Roadster, wire wheels,
luggage rack, radio. 665-5620. N8
'59 OLDS, 4 door station wagon. Call
NO 3-3547. N2
BARGAIN CORNER
SAM'S STORE
Has Genuine LEVI'S Galore!
LEVI'S SLIM-FITS-$4.25
"White," and 5 Colors
For "Guys and Gals"
Cord. SLIM-FITS-$5.98
LEVI'S STA-PREST PANTS
Never Needs Ironing
Asst'd. Colors-$6.98

HELP WANTED
EDITOR-TYPIST required for summer
job. Call Prof. Uttall at 764-4228. H4
PART TIME--Young woman to work at
Univ. Hospital about 1 hr. daily.
Ideal for someone living in Univ.
Terrace or vicinity. Do not phone
Hosp. Please write time of day avail.
and describe any previous work ex-
perience to Box No. 7, 420 Maynard,
Ann Arbor. H5
BLOOD DONORS
URGENTLY NEEDED
$6 for Rh positive; $7 and $10 for Rh
negative. Hours: Mon., 9-4; Tues.,
9-4; Fri., 1-7, 18-21 yrs. old need
parent's permission. Detroit Blood
Service, new location, 404 W. Mich-
igan, Ypsilanti, Mich. H29
STUDENTS--Choose your own hours!
Scholarship offeredl Call 761-2779
8-11 a.m. 1F7
SUMMER SUBLET
NEED THIRD girl for spring half.
Across from IM Bldg., bi-level, air-
conditioned. Call 663-2253. U6
REDUCED FOR THE SUMMER
Furnished and unfurnished for 1-4
people. Call 663-7268. U7
725 HAVEN, 2-3 man furn. apt. Wall-
to-wall carpeting, disposal, prkng.
Will bargain. Call 761-0434. U2
WANTED-2 girls to share luxury apt.
Close to campus. Call 665-2805 after
6:00. U4
FOR GRAD. man or teacher, 2 rm unit
furn. Sub-lease sacrifice. Move in
today. Inquire at 917 Mary St. Phone
2-0521. U4
2ND SESSION, for 2, 3 or 4, new air
cond. apt. Bargain summer rates.
Call 668-8723, 665-8330 or 665-2689. U3
2 GIRLS to complete 4 man apt., air-
con'd., swimming pool, lounge, ne
gotiable. Call 761-0776. U3
MALE ROOMATE for air con'd. apt.
Call 2-1477 evenings US
SUMMER SUBLET: Air-con'd., 1 bdrm
apt. June 20-Aug. 20. $100-$125/mo.
Purcell, 247A Bay, Santa Monica, Cal.
4 PEOPLE to sublease apt. May 5 to
Sept. 1. Furn and air cond. Call
HU 3-6100, ext. 3960. US
SUBJECTS
WANTED
for PAID
Psychological
Experiments
Call
764-2583

S-T-R-E-T-C-H LEVI'S
For Gals and Guys
"White" and Colors---$5.98

LEVI JACKETS
Blue Denim-$5.49
"White"-$5.98

FOR SALE

LEVI'S Superslim's-$4.98
LEVI'S Dungarees-$4.49
TURTLENECKS-$1.69
(15 Colors)
Open Mon. & Fri. Nites
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington

BUY AND SELL THROUGH
The Clearing House
A listing service for privately
owned articles.
Autos, motorcycles, bikes, T.V.,
Hi-Fi's, furniture, cameras, etc.
PHONE 662-6574, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
HONDA NOW! Buy, reserve, or lay-
away before the spring rush. 24 hr.
delivery on all 12 popular 1965 mod-
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them at HONDA OF ANN ARBOR,
1906 Packard Rd., 665-9281. Z
SEE IT NOW-The '65 Yamaha with
the revolutionary new oil injection
system. No more fuss or muss..
NICHOLSON MOTOR SALES
223 S. First

on Mother's Day

* .

Chronicle of US. Mistakes

Take Her Out
To Dinner .. .

TAKE YOUR MOM TO
Old Heidelberg
211-213 N. Main St. 668-9753
Specializing in GERMAN FOOD,
FINE BEER, WINE, LIQUOR
PARKING ON ASHLEY ST.
Hours: Daily 1 1 A.M.-2 A.M. Closed Mondays

dictator and those of
of his family.

members1

THE COUNTRY'S dependence
upon a single crop-sugar-grew
increasingly over time, constitut-
ing 63 per cent of the export
economy by 1963. Of the country's
exports, 46 per cent fell to the
United States.
Both because of his increasing
dependence on military force and
because of the massive nature of
U.S. investment in his country,
Trujillo's lobbyists in the United
States proliferated.
* At times they seemed to enjoy a
closer relationship to the State
Department than the Congress.
All the while, the conditions of
life of the Dominican peasant did
not improve measurably. The
country's per capita income ($163
in 1955) is still far from impres-
sive.
POLITICAL REPRESSION grew.
Increasingly, the dictator's ene-
mies were forced into exile or were
killed. Many of the men who had
initially supported Trujillo as a
potentially stabilizing force left
the country. .
The champion of many Domini-
can exiles-and -one of the leaders
of the "democratic left" which
emerged in Latin America during
the Second World War-was Juan
Bosch.
Bosch was both a prolific writer
and a devoted anti-Communist. In
much the manner of his fellows
In arms (Betancourt of Venezuela,
Haya de la Torre of Peru, Fig-
ueres), Bosch sought to build a
"progressive" social and economic
life for his country-but within
the context of a broad sphere of
cooperation with the United
m4.. 4+.

Thus, it was Bosch's group that
emerged from the chaos that fol-
lowed upon the dictators death as
the country's only "representative"
political force.
ALTHOUGH the seven months
he spent in office after being
elected in early 1963 hardly pro-
vided an adequate "test" of his
political attitudes or abilities,
there are no indications that any-
one who could be vaguely con-
strued as a "leftwing extremist"
(in Washington's words) played
even a marginal role in the con-
duct of Bosch's government.
In light of this, the "Commun-
ists" everyone discovered under
"rocks and in the crannies of the
,"movement" which sought to re-
turn him to power are a strange
and unprecendented bunch.
The United States' defiant "an-
ti-Communism-at-all-costs" must
seem strange, indeed, to Latin
Americans.
Throughout Latin America, the
CP has assiduously cooperated
with every dictatorship imaginable
since the mid-1950's. The universal
image of the CP in the Dominican
Republic and throughout the area,
thus (here the reader is warned to
hang tightly onto his preconcep-
tions) is one of reaction and anti-
revolution.
THE ORTHODOX CP (what
the Michigan farmer might call
the "Kremlin-directed bunch")
did not play either a decisive or
a substantial role, for instance,
in the Cuban revolution; but, in
fact, supported Bastista. The CP
thus only came to play a marginal
role in Castro's government only
after the revolution.
THIS IS th e iroum which wea re

AFTER THE FALL of the Bosch
regime, then, both Wessin y Wes-
sin and the other members of
the military Junta continued to
exercise a good deal of influence
over the actions of the "civilian
government" established under
Festival
Opens
At Hill Auditorium
THAT 72 YEAR old Eastern
road show called the May Fes-
tival rolled into town last night
for a weekend stand.
The great furry beast with the
overstuffed paws called the Phila-
delphia Orchestra ambled amic-
ably over familar symphonic
ground in its usual desultory way.
Miss Leontyne Price was twice
called in to outsing the outsized
ensemble in two shopworn concert
arias and "Vissi d'Arte" as an
encore.
After the encore I suddenly had
a vision of Miss Price and the
orchestra collaborating in a su-
perb performance of any of Berg's
orchestral songs, for which they
might be beautifully suited; this
pipe dream vanished in a rerun
of Stravinsky's "Firebird" that
made the piece sound like it was
even more than 50 years old.
DO THE violins have to play
the "Berceuse" from "Firebird"
as if it were "Liebestod" from
"Tristan?" Does the Philadelphia
always have to wait till the last
movement of a Beethoven sym-
phony to discover tight structure

Donald Reid Cabral.
The "civilian government" had
about itself many of the trappings
of efficiency which seem to warm
the hearts of Washington's latest
group of visionaries.
In recent months, sentiment in
the Dominican Republic, has,
however, turned increasingly
against the sort of "efficiency"
practiced by the government.
It seems clear that both the
lack of a program for real land
reform and the increasingly rep-
ressive nature of the government's
"reprisals" and other political
head hunting have weighed heav-
ily in producing the present revolt.
The immediate pragratics of
the Dominican situation aside,
there is reason to believe that our
actions there will raise up in their
shadow an image of the United
States in Latin America-an im-
age founded upon fear and mis-
trust-which this country will find
it hard to live down.
IT WAS in this context last
week that a partly planned but
largely spontaneous revolt grew
against the government in power.
There is still much uncertain as
regards the character of this
"movement" itself, but this much
seems clear:
-The rebellion began as a move
to oust Donald Reid Cabral's gov-
ernment and place Bosch back in
power;
--The leaders of the military
arm of the movement were pro-
fessional military officers (some
were related to members of the
Trujillo regime) many of whom
were trained in the United States.
-Finally, there existed after the
institution of the coup a fairly
substantial number of insurgents
nva uyir nh rxrnvri.r m r

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Friday and Saturday until 8:30 P.M.

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After the Concerts
Between the Concerts
Ej
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