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July 03, 1965 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1965-07-03

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SATURDAY, JVL"Y' 3,4965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

~ATUDAYJUL 3, 945TE MCHIGN DALYAGE HRE

May

Form New

ANTONIO GUZMAN

JOAQUIN BALAGUER

Regime
SANTO DOMINGOs P)-A well-
known Dominican surgeon, Dr.
Felix A. Goico emerged yesterday
as the leading candidate for pres-
ident of a provisional government
Spokesmen for the rebels and
the civilian-military junta said
Goica is acceptable. There were
predictions that a provisional gov-
ernment could be formed within a
week.
The next step would be getting
the rebels to carry out their
pledge to turn in their arms to
an acceptable provisional govern-
ment.
Goica was proposed Thursday
by the three-man Organization of
American States negotiating team,
headed by Ellsworth Bunker of
the United States. The rebels en-
dorsed Goica, said Antonio Guz-
man, one of the rebel negotiators.
Gen. Antonio Imbert Barreras,
head of the civilian-military jun-
ta, told newsmen that he tried
weeks ago to get Goica to join
his junta. He added:
"We have to talk this over now
to get the right man on the pro-
visional government. The door is
open for further talks with the
OAS. It is up to the OAS to sug-
gest names."
Former President Joaquin Bala-
guer, who returned Monday, end-
ing- three years' exile, described
Goica as a nonpolitical figure
highly qualified to head the pro-
visional government. He said Goico
is willing to accept the job.
Balaguer has ruled himself out
as a member of the provisional
government. He has said he will
be a presidential candidate in the
elections to be held in six to nine
months under the OAS peace
formula.
The Week
To Come

National -Roundup
By The Associated Press
CAPE KENNEDY, Fla.-Hurricane-hunting Tiros 10 soaredaround
the globe in perfect working order yesterday and the space agency
said it expected the satellite to start transmitting useful weather pic-
ures on Sunday.
The Soviet Union, meanwhile, launched another unmanned satel-
lite in its Cosmos series, Tass news agency announced. The .new satel-
lite, Cosmos 70, "carries scientific equipment designed to continue the
study of outer space," Tass reported.
Tiros 10 was launched late Thursday night by a three-stage Delta
rocket and swung into an orbit ranging from 467 to 521 miles high.
LANSING-The Democratic State Central Committee- plans to
vote July 18 on whether to call a special nonelection year party con-
vention in October for discussion. of state issues.
Democratic State Chairman Zolton Ferency announced the meet-
ing Thursday.
NEW YORK-The stock market kept its rally going yesterday, but
just barely.
For the fourth straight day, the market closed higher-but it
took a late surge of buying power to do it. Most of the day it idled
along.
A total of 4.26 million-shares changed hands, compared with 4.52
million shares Thursday. Volume both days was less than half that of
Tuesday, when it soared over 10 million shares.
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CINEMA GUILDi
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CHARLIE CHAPLIN
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THE GOLD RUSH
Sr
Pearl White- in PLUNDER
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Announces Creation
Of Teachers' Corps
NEW YORK (P)-Educators from across the nation cheered Presi-
dent Lyndon B. Johnson yesterday as he announced plans for a Na-
tional Teachers Corps to work in city slums and areas of rural poverty.
Addressing some 11,000 delegates to the annual convention of the
National Education Association in Madison Square Garden; Johnson
said his administration will not cease its efforts to improve education
"until every child in the land can have all the education, of the
highest quality, which his ambition demands and his mind can absorb."
The teachers' corp that Johnson announced plans to establish will
work alongside local teachers. He said the corps members will be
young people preparing for teaching careers, and experienced teachers

Vatican Callsl
Po pe's Visit
'Possibility'
VATICAN CITY (P)-Pope Paul
VI may well accept an invitation
and travel to the United Nations,
probably after the first of the
year,Vatican sources announced
yesterday.
The Vatican broke weeks of of-
ficial silence on published specu-
lation about such an unprecedent-
ed papal visit to America in a
press office communique which
said Pope Paul had expressed his
appreciation to UN Secretary-
General U Thant for the invita-
tion.
Communique
The communique said it is pre-
mature to say when, or whether,
the Pope might go to New York-
but the very fact that the an-
nouncement was made by the Vat-
ican at all was taken as an indi-
cation that the Pope has the trip
under serious consideration. Gen-
eral belief is that he has not defi-
nitely made up his mind, but is
inclined to accept Thant's invita-
tion.
There was no indication wheth-
er he would travel in the United
States beyond the UN. One report
here was that he would strictly
limit his invitation to the UN, fly=
ing by helicopter between the UN
building and New York's Kennedy
Airport.
U.S. Welcome
In Washington, State Depart-
nent Press Officer Robert Mc-
Closkey said the U.S. would wel-
come a visit by the Pontiff if he
decides to come to this country.
McCloskey said he was aware
only of press reports that Pope
Paul might visit the UN. He add-
ed that he could not confirm that
the U.S. government has issued
an invitation.

%willing to give a year of work in
places of greatest need.
Soon after the President ar-
rived from Washington, federal!
and local police broadcast an
alarm for a man described as
"armed and considered danger-
ous," in connection with a threat
on his life. The alarm was can-
celled five minutes later, without
any explanation.
At the NEA session, delegates
cheered Johnson with particular
vigor when he told them of aj
fellowship plan for elementaryI
and secondary schoolteachers!
which he said would assist Ne-
gro teachers, who are dismissed
as a result of desegregation, to ac-
quire the needed skills for new
and challenging jobs.
Johnson said he has directed
the commissioner of education "to
pay special attention, in review-
ing desegregation plans, to guard
against any pattern of teacher
dismissals based on race or na-
tional origin.
When upgrading of the teach-{
ing staff is required in newly in-
tegrated districts, Johnson said,1
he has instructed education offi-
cials to provide funds for teach-3
er institutes from the National
Defense Education Act and to as-
sist school districts through the
Civil Rights Act.
"When an integrated school sys-
tem requires fewer teachers than
those required to operate two seg-
regated school systems, I have di-
rected federal officials to provide1
special reemployment services
through a national program car-
ried out by the U.S. Employment,
Service," Johnson said.
"When unemployed teachers
need and desire refresher train-
ing, I have ordered federal offi-
cials to provide this training un-
der the Manpower Development
and Training Act. Such a trainingi
program has already proven its
worth in this city, sponsored by
the Urban League at Yeshiva
University."
In his State of the Union mes-a
sage next January, Johnson said,
"I intend to offer more new pro-
posals to improve the education
of all Americans."

-Associated Press
A VIETNAMESE PARATROOPER holds his pistol is he guards a Viet Cong guerrilla taken
prisoner during the battle near Cheo Reo. The air strips at Cheo Reo and Soc Trang came under
attack from Viet Cong mortars at dawn yesterday. Three helicopters were damaged during the
attack.
U.S. Pae Hit Dien Bien Pur

SATURDAY, JULY 3
7 p.m. and 9 p.m.-The Cinema
Guild will present "The Gold
IRush" starring Charlie Chaplin
and Mack Swain in the Architec-
ture Aud.
8 p.m.-The University. Players
will present "The Threepenny Op-
era" by Bertolt Brecht and Kurt
Weill in Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
ter.
TUESDAY, JULY 6
1:30 p.m.-The Audio Visual
Education Center Film Preview
will feature "Understanding the
Gifted" and f'Mathematics for
Tomorrow" in the UGLI.
4 p.m.-Jean Reynolds of the
Ann Arbor Public Schools will
lecture on "Teaching a Poem."
WEDNESDAY, JULY 7
1:30 p.m.-The Audio Visual
Education Center Preview will
feature "College Prespectives,"
and "This Is Larry" in the UGLI.
THURSDAY, JULY 8
1:30 p.m.-The Audio Visual
Center Film Preview will feature
"Plato's Apology" and "Macbeth,
Part II: The Themes of Macbeth"
in the UGLI.
FRIDAY, JULY 9
1:30 p.m.-The Audio Visual
Education Center Film Preview
will feature "Peter Tchaikowsky"
and "Peter and the Wolf."
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild
will present Alec Guinness in "The
Lavender Hill Mob" in the Arch-
itecture Aud.
8:30 p.m.-Prof. Dennis Walsh
of the astronomy department will
speak on "Exploding Galaxies" at
the astronomy department's visit-
ing night.

SAIGON W) - Thirty United
States Air Force planes worked
over military targets yesterday at
Dien Bien Phu, symbol of France's
defeat in the Indochina war. It
was a fresh thrust north of the
Hanoi line.
Strikes at the airfield and bar-
racks of Dien Bien Phu, a jungle
stronghold 185 miles west-north-
west of Hanoi, highlighted a day
of action on both sides of the
Vietnamese boorder.
Pilots said they destroyed six
barracks buildings, razed 12. other
buildings and cratered the run-
way of the airfield in two 30-
minute attacks.
They loosed 58 tons of bombs,
plus an assortment of rockets and
missiles,
They reported no opposition, air
or ground, in the area.
Nam Binh Raid
Twenty U.S. Navy pilots hit the
Nam Binh oil tank farm in a
raid that, judging from a brief-
ing officer's account, sent up 12,-
000-foot smoke columns that
should have been clearly visible in
Hanoi, 40 miles away to the
northwest. This strike was five
miles closer to North Viet Nam's
capital than any previously an-
nounced.
In Saigon, a U.S. spokesman
said South Vietnamese troops

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B ULLETIN '

killed 120 Viet Cong and captured
eight in three ground operations.
Most of the casualties were re-,
ported inflicted in a fight in Thua
Thien province, 400 miles north
of Saigon.
Air strips at Cheo Reo and Soc
Trang came under Communist
mortar attacks before dawn. Brief-
ing officers said three helicopters
were damaged at Cheo Reo, 220
miles northeast of Saigon, and
one helicopter crashed due to
mechanical failure after it took off
to evade the shelling at Soc
Trang, 100 miles southeast of Sai-
gon. One American at Soc Trang
was reported wounded slightly.
Airlift
Four U.S. Marines were airlift-
ed to safety after their helicopter
was forced down by engine trouble
nine miles southwest of Da Nang.
There were no injured. The dis-
abled helicopter was destroyed by
Skyhawk jets from the U.S. 7th
fleet following a report that a
large force of Viet Cong guerrillas,
which might strip it of weapons,
was near.
The Viet Cong, via Radio Hanoi,
joined the Soviet Union, Red
China and North Viet Nam'in re-'
jecting British Prime Minister'
Harold Wilson's Commonwealth
peace mission.
"The so-called peace initiative
of Wilson is but another trick
aimed to extricate the U.S. ag-
gressors from their predicament,
to cover up their criminal acts of
war and to divert the attention of
world opinion," a spokesman said.
Reinforcement
A powerful reinforcement for
the allied war effort shaped up
in South Korea. President Chung
Lee Park's cabinet decided in
Seoul to send a combat division
and supporting units-perhaps
15,000 soldiers-to South Viet
Nam. About 2,500 South, Koreans
already are on duty in noncombat
roles, largely for construction
work.
The move must be approved by
the Korean National Assembly.
I ,
DIAL 8-6416
ENDING TON IGHT
"A THRILLER,
more than tinglingI
.. as fascinating
S as it is dazzlingly
beautiful --as
sharply, smoothly
cut as a diamond"
-Crowther, N. Y. Times
Rene
Clement's
' M A!N DEON

The assembly is expected to take
the matter up when it meets on
July 12.
The cabinet responded to a re-
cent request by the South Viet-
namese government to send the
combat division.
An announcement said the gov-
ernment was acting "with a view
to making a contribution to world
peace by building up the Asian
anti-Communist fortifications in
line with the free world nations'
collective security action in Korea
during the Korean war.
Raps Campus
Communism
BOSTON (P)-American college.
students and faculty members are
prime targets of Communist party
attention now more than ever in
the party's history, according to
J. Edgar Hoover, director of the
Federal Bureau of Investigation.
"The Communist Party is today
expending tremendous energy at-
tempting to increase its influence
among college students," he said
in a copyright interview published
in yesterday's Christian Science
Monitor.
"Last summer, the party estab-
lished the W. E. B. DuBois Clubs,
a Communist-front group design-
ed to appeal to college young peo-
ple," Hoover said.
"In recent months, the party
has been trying to exploit the stu-
dent unrest evident on a number
of college campuses, such as the
riots at the University of Califor-
nia at Berkeley," he continued.
DIAL 662-6264

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
ofticial publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumesnoeditor-
tal responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRI'TEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the Pay preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be nublished a mai-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organiiation notices are not
accepted bor publication.
SATURDAY, JULY 3
Day Calendar
Cinema Guild-Charlie Chaplin and

i

Mack Swain in "The Gold Rush": Arch-
itecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Events Sunday
No Events Scheduled.
Events Monday
No Events Scheduled.
General Notices
Final Payment of Summer Half Term
Fees and Spring Summer Full Term Fees
are due and payable on or before July 6.
Non payment, payment of less than
the required amount or late payment
will result in the assessment of a de-
linquent penalty of $5 for the Half-
Term and $10 for the Full-Term stu-
dents. In ,addition, a Hold Credit will
be placed against your grades if your
account remains delinquent.
Payments may be made in person
or mailed to the Cashier's Office, 1015
Admin. Bldg. before 4:30 p.m., Tues-
day, July 6.
Mall Early.
Mail payments postmarked after due
date, July 6, are late and subject to
penalty.
Identify mail payments as tuition and
show student number and name.
Lecture: Jean Reynolds, language co-
ordinator, Language Arts, Ann Arbor
Public Schools, "Teaching a Poem: A
Demonstration Class," on Tues., July
6, 4 p.m., Angell Hall, Aud. C. Open
to the public.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Ferris State College, Big Rapids, Mich.

terviewing. Degree in Bus., Mgmt.,
C Econ., Indus. Educ., or rel. Make ap-
pointments immediately. Call 764-7460,
Bureau of Appointments.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Welch Grape Juice Co., Westfield,
N.Y.-1. Systems analyst. BA acctg.,
math, or mgmt. sci. plus 3-5 yrs. ex-
Iper. 2. Prod. supv. EBS Ch., Mech., or
Indust. Engwrg. plus 2 yrs. exper. in
process type industry.
National Radio Astronomy Laboratory,
Green Bank, W. Va.-1. Numerical An-
alyst. PhD or MS plus exper. 2. Systems
Analyst-Sr. Programmer. MS or BS
with exper. 3. Programmers. BS Phys.
Sci., computer bkgd.
Ansul Co., Marinette, Wis.-various
openings including 1. Chemist, degree,
1-2 yrs, exper. 2. Auditor, acctg. de-
gree plus exper. 3. Dev. Engr. BS ChE
plus 1-2 yrs, exper. 4. Sales Repres.
Chem. degree. Extensive travel.
Sangamo Electric Co., Springfield, Ii.
-Various openings for engrs. including
$ndust., Des., Quality Control ,etc.
Also 1. Admin. Asst. Engrg. degree plus
8 yrs. exper. in Elect. engrg. 2. Prod-
uct Promotional Supv. Write & supv.
aclvtg. Bkgd. in engrg. or mktg. 3. Tech.
writer, degree or knowl. of electron-
ics. Elect. exper. & familiar with mili-
tary pref.
Sonoma County, Calif.-Grad Physical
Therapist, qualified for Calif. regis-
tration for school for handicapped
children, Exper, not req., but gains
higher dating. mjSs,veAeprD
higher rating.
Connecticut State, Hartford - Direc-
tor for family centered welfare project.
MSW plus 3 yrs. exper. or BS plus 5
yrs. exper. 2 yrs, supv. or admin. ex-
per. req. Plan & direct activities. An-
alyze personnel & budget needs.

ENDS TODAY
FRANK SINATRA
VON RYAN'S EXPRESS

>'SUNDAY
SHE who must be obeyed!
SHE who must be loved!..
SHE who mUst be possessed

-I

COM TO CHURCH

ON THE

SAB BATH

UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Services of Worship
The Campus Ministry of the United Pres-
byterian Church in the U.S.A. invites you
to worship at one of the Presbyterian
Churches of Ann Arbor:
CALVARY UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
2727 Fernwood
Worship Service-10:30 a.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
Worship Services-9:00 and 10:30 a.m.
NORTHSIDE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Temporarily worshipping at the
Phi Chi Medical Fraternity
2250 Fuller Road
Worship Service-10:45 a.m.
WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHUCH
1914 Greenview Drive
Worship Service-I 1:00 a.m.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Meeting at YM-YWCA-350 S. Fifth

BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. E. R. Klaudt, Rev. A. C. Bizer,
and Rev. A. J. Habermehl, Pastors
7:30 p.m.-Student Guild.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Service.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenow
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Stephen J. Sein, Vicar
Sunday at 9:15 a.m.-Bible Class.
Sunday at 10:30 a.m.-Worship Service.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Devotion.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Only One Service-10:00 a.m.-"Independ-
ence," the Rev. George S. Fearnehough.
Infant and toddler care in Nursery. Older chil-
dren worship with parents.
Student Guild, 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.

ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH and
the EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Diviison
Phone 662-4097
SUNDAY
8:00 am.-Holy Communion (Breakfast at
Canterbury between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.
services).
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion with Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Holy Communion.
MIDWEEK SERVICES
Wednesday, 7 a.m.-Holy Communion.
Friday, 12:10 p.m.-Holy Communion.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Pastors: Henry O. Yoder
Norman A. Erikson
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.
7:00 p.m.-Informal "Get-together."

-Will interview Fri., July 9, for as- * * *
sistants for one year research project. For further information, please call
Determine need for tech. trained peo- 764-7460, General Diuv, Bureau of Ap-
ple in industry. Involves travel & in- pointments, 3200 SAB.
Peter Sellers Peter O'ool
Rom S ud ie
{Paula Prentss
WoU ody Allen
$ and guest star
Ursula Andress
Thytre all tgte again! (o the first tm!

I

IF YOU NEVER SEE ANOTHER FILM
YOU MUST SEE "MONDO CANE,"
THE MOST EXCITING, SHOCKING
THRILLER EVER MADE!

SEASON'S
ARGUE
ABOUTcE

C

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