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July 01, 1965 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1965-07-01

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Th URSDAY, JULY 1, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

ThURSDAY, JULY 1,1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

CHANGE RENT LIMITS:
Atered Housing Bill Passed

The Hidden

ar of the

iet Cong

WASHINGTON (P)-The House
passed by a vote of 245-169 yes-
terday a four-year; $5.3 billion
housing bill containing a dras-
tically modified version of Presi-
dent Lyndon B. Johnson's pro-
posal to subsidize rents of some
lower-income families.
Democratic handlers of the bill,
apparently unsure of a safe mar-
gin after two days of debate and
intensive work among party mem-
bers, ,gave ground by writing in
tighter income limitations on eli-
gibility for the supplements and
by cutting the funds proposed for
them.
These concessions did not win
much Republican support, but
held enough Democrats to avert
outright removal of the rent sup-
plement plan.
The House defeated a move to
cut the supplement plan, 208 to
202.
Changes
As it was finally approved, the
rent supplement plan was shifted
substantially from the original ad-
ministration concept, which was
an effort to meet housing needs
of families not poor enough to
qualify for low-rent, publicly
owned housing, yet unable to pay
for adequate housing on the open
market.
The program was rewritten so
it would only be available to the
same group of families that could
qualify for public housing.
The income level for such eligi-
bility will be locally determined
in each community and much of
the debate on the bill raged over
the limits that would apply.
How Much?
One representative told the
* House the maximum family in-,
comes for admission to public
housing ranged from $2,720 an-
nually in Houston to $5,760 in
New York.
But another said that under
some interpretations, families with
an income as high as $11,300
might qualify in New York.
The bill as passed contains a
number of innovations in addition
to the rent supplement scheme
which, as modified, would be an
alternate to public housing for
some families.
No Down Payment
Other new features are no-
down-payment FHA home loans
for peace-time veterans, mortgage
insurance for land development
and grants for neighborhood fa-

cilities, parks and playgrounds, as
well as for rehabilitation of de-
pressed-area homes.
The bill also would continue the
established programs such as FHA,
Urban Redevelopment'and financ-
ing of college dormitories.
It now goes to the Senate where
its chances of approval are good.
A Senate committee has approved
generally similar legislation but it
has not been set for debate.
'Subterfuge'
Republican leader Gerald Ford
of Michigan called the retooled
rent supplement plan a camou-
flage and subterfuge adopted be-
cause the original proposition
would have been defeated.
Rep. William B. Widnall (D-
NJ) said he would have voted for
the original, but rejected the sub-

stitute. Bringing it out with no
earlier committee consideration,
he said, was "the craziest way to
legislate I can think of."
But Speaker John W. McCor-
mack (L-Mass) termed the pro-
posal "a subsidy for human beings
who have been forgotten," and
urged approval.
Show Intentions
The Democratic leader, Rep.
Carl Albert of Oklahoma, said the
intention was to help really needy
families "and this amendment will
kill any lingering doubts that this
is what we do."
Chairman Wright Patman (D-
Tex), of the House Banking Com-
mittee, said the "great strength
of this plan is that it enables the
private enterprise system to meet
some of the need."

FIDEL CASTRO HOARI BOUMEDIENNE
Algerian Chief Answers
Criticism- from Castro
ALGIERS 0P)-Col. Houari Boumedienne bluntly told his foreign
Communist critics yesterday that Algeria has "no need for advice
from abroad" on how to build a socialist society.
In one of his rare speeches since he took, power in a predawn
coup June 19, the strongman defended his regime against a recent
scathing attack by Prime Minister Fidel Castro of Cuba and growing
criticism in the Communist newspapers of Western Europe.
Castro called the new regime a fascist, reactionary military
dictatorship.
Departure
Castro's speech departed from the attitude the Soviet Union,
Chas taken-one of fence-strad-'

EDITOR'S NOTE: How is the Viet
Cong able to do it? How can a
guerrilla force survive the onslaught
of modern weapons and go on to
fight another day? Here is a study
of guerrilla methods in Viet Nam,
reported by a correspondent whose
four years in the war area have
given him many chances to observe
Viet Cong methods.
By MALCOLM W. BROWNE
Associated Press Staff Writer
SAIGON-You can pretty well
reconstruct the way the Viet Cong
operates:
A small brown man squats un-
derground in an improvised echo
chamber, straining his ears for the
slightest sound.
Naked except for black shorts, a
long rice pouch over one shoulder
and a belt slung with hand gre-
nades, he has been squatting pa-
tiently for hours.
It is nearly dark in the cham-
ber, except for daylight streaming
through the sound slots around the
top. Through these slots, the first
sounds come, reflecting from the
curved sides of the chamber and
amplifying at the man's ears.
Then the distant thudding of heli-
copter rotor blades.
Alarm
The man, wriggling through a
short tunnel to the surface, can
yell an alarm. Instantly, shadowy
men lounging or cooking at the
bases of the tall trees are on their
feet and moving fast. The heavy
equipment from last night's battle
has been stowed for future use in
deep, camouflaged holes. The
bodies have been buried.
The men move rapidly, scatter-
ing in many directions in twos and
threes. This is their base area,
and they knew every feature of
the dense jungle in the area-the
hidden trails, the camouflaged
bunkers and tunnels, the gun em-
placements, the mines and booby
traps.
Viet Cong positions were first
prepared here years ago and with
each month the positions have
been improved. The Viet Cong
guerrilla spends much of his day
digging, even when there is no im-
mediate need for it.
Hidden Entrance
The entrance to a tunnel might
be under a heavy rock, it might
be under the hearth of a peasant's
hut, it might be under water in
the bank of a mountain stream.
Only by sheer luck would a gov-
ernment soldier find one, and if he
did, he probably would kill only
a few Viet Cong. The rest would
be elsewhere.
In an air raid, some of the tun-
nels and bunkers would be crush-
ed. A jellied furnace of napalm
would ooze down into some of the
air holes. But many of the bunk-
ers would be deep enough to sur-
vive even direct hits by heavy
bombs, and their galleries of men
and weapons would survive. At
nightfall, it would be safe to move
around again.
The government soldier might
find just empty space here, or his
battalions might walk into a
jungle trap, a devastating mortar
barrage from prepared positions,
followed by a regimental guerrilla
onslaught. He would have to
thread his way carefully through
the jungle, and take a series of
casualties from man-traps and
snipers.
Short Lived
Most of all he would have to
move in large groups because uni-
formed stragglers do not live long
in the jungle. Big groups on the
other hand always betray their
presence. The guerrillas could
choose to slip away or fight, on
their own terms.
Nearly always, the Viet Cong
will know what to expect, long in
advance.

The warning may come from1
the echo chamber. It may come in
a radio message from a comradex
miles away. It may come from
peasants in the area, who eitherc
fear the Viet Cong or are more or
less on the Viet Cong side. It may
come from a bar girl who was
drinking with government or
American troops the night before.c
Tipoff
The tip may come from thef
strike force itself. If it is to be1
an air strike, there always will be1
a light reconnaissance plane
cruising over the area hours or
perhaps days in advance. The pro-
longed presence of a light plane
anywhere in Viet Nam is a sure
sign of an impending government
air strike or assault.
The South Vietnamese haul
men and cannon and gear in
trucks as far as they can, or use
helicopters that may be limited in
their landing zones to a few clear
patches in the jungle. The guer-
rilla almost always will move
overland, toting everything he
needs on his back, and skirting
the roads, unless he wants to am-
bush them.
When the government forces are
finished for the day, they probab-
ly will move to some safer area
before nightfall. Night belongs to
the guerrilla. If government forces
decide to stay overnight, they
often bivouac in a small area,
setting up a perimiter defense. Un-
disciplined soldiers may chatter
and cook, perhaps even using lan-
terns. They can become sitting
ducks for a mortar barrage.
Best Friend
In the jungle, the wilderness it-
self is the guerrilla's best friend.
In the cities and towns, the guer-
rillas' best camouflage is people.
A guerrilla terrorist in a crowded
city looks no different from hun-
dreds of thousands of other
youths.
He is likely to be wearing dark
trousers and a sport shirt, and he
across
Campus
THURSDAY, JUNE 1
7:30 p.m.-Prof. H. A. Gleason
will speak on "Writing Systems:
Their Form and Place" in Aud. A.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present "The Threepenny Op-
era" by Bertolt Brecht and Kurt
Weil.

probably has a bicycle, motor
scooter or even automobile. Only
by luck will an unusually con-
scientious policeman stop him to
check the bundle on his scooter.
He may even be dressed in Viet-
namese army uniform. Two bogus
Vietnamese army officers drove
into the courtyard of the U S.
officers' brink hotel last Christ-
mas eve, parked a jeep and walk-
ed away. Within an hour half the
hotel was a blazing, bomb-blasted
pile of rubble.
Infiltration
The terrorist may be working in

a cell infiltrated by a government
informer. He may be caught, and
end up before a firing squad in
Saigon's central market. He prob-
ably is a fanatically anti-Ameri-
can youth who will yell anti-
American and Communist slogans
before the bullets cut him down.
The half dozen other terrorists
who share his cell also may be
arrested and shot.
But smashing one cell does not
stop the terror. The cells are
built into a tight system of con-
spiratorial secrecy. Members rare-
ly know anyone in the terror net-

work outside their own immediate
cells.
"We have yet to develop a ma-
chine that could tell at a glance
whether or not a man is a Viet
Cong. If we could do that, this
battle would be won," a U.S.
counter-intelligence operative said
recently.
So far, the powerful weapons of
the 20th century have had little
more effect on the Viet Cong
guerrillas.. than did the British
Redcoats, with their superior
musketry, on the American guer-
rillas of two centuries ago.
It is a hard tactic to beat.

CAPTURED VIET CONG troops (left) are usually smoked and bombed out by helicopters supplied to the South Vietnamese by the
U.S. However, many more get away than are caught, and their guerrilla tactics present a major roadblock to U.S. aims in Viet Nam,
Though there are less Viet Cong than government troops, they often win vital victories or escape serious defeat by hidden retreats.

P

I I

World News Roundup

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-The stock market
bounded higher yesterday; for the
second straight day the gain was
the biggest in 19 months. But, in
contrast to Tuesday's wild see-

sawing, it was all on the upgrade.'
* * *
WASHINGTON - Living costs
hit a new high last month, W. Wil-
lard Wirtz, head of the Labor De-
partment, reported yesterday.
Figures released by' the gotern-
ment were up 1.7 per cent over
the mark of a year ago; the index
of consumer prices rose to 109.6,
which meant that consumer goods
able to be bought for $10 in the
1957-59 period now cost $10.96.
BONN-The West German par-
liament yesterday enacted a law
requiring air raid shelters in all
new residential a n d business
buildings.
The law also requires people to
buy and store rations and emer-
gency gear for survival'in war.
Under the new law all buildings
started after July 1, 1966, must
contain cellars that can be used
as air raid shelters. The govern-
ment will pay one-fourth the cost.
* * *
WASHINGTON - At midnight
last night the United States en-
tered its 53rd straight month of
rising prosperity and its sixth
straight year of deficit financing.
It closed the books on fiscal
1965, the crucial testing year of
what President Lyndon B. John-
son calls "expansionary fiscal
policy," with a smaller-than-ex-
pected budget deficit-$3.8 billion
or, quite possibly, less.
The deficit is at least $2.5 bil-
lion smaller than the $6.3 billion
which Johnson predicted in his
budget message last January.

dling. The Kremlin has neither'
repudiated or recognized the new
Algerian regime so far. The only
sign from Russia has been a state-
ment yesterday by President
Anastas I Mikoyan that he is
sure the Algerian people will con-
tinue with a socialist government.
Boumedienne referred contemp-
tuously to French, Chinese and
other Communist advisers sur-
rounding Ben Bella who abruptly
left the country or went under-
ground the morning after the
coup.
"For three years our country
was infested with adventurers who
called themselves advisers, who
had made a mess of revolutions
elsewhere and who tried to use
Algeria as a test site for their
experiments," he said.
No Advisors
He made it clear that Algeria,
while continuing its own brand
of socialism, would no longer tol-
ergte such advisers.
Foreign Minister Abdelaziz Bou-
teflika received all the foreign
ambassadors one by one on the
day after the coup. He told those
from Communist nations that Al-

SUMMER PLAYBILL
presents the
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS,
THE"THREEPENNY
OPERA
by Bertolt Brecht & Kurt Well .
.TO.DAY tkru Saturdayj
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~~~~~~~. :..55:":::555'5::=:..555:+:::,.::: ....
July 14-17
THE CONFIDENTIAL CLERK,.
by T. S. Eliot
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geria would tolerate
ence in its internal
intended to pursue
socialism in its own
Algerian" way.

no interfer-
af fairs and
its path to
"specifically

mmowd

W. WILLARD WIRTZ
CO-ED
FOLK DANCE
Fridays, 8-11
Instruction - Refreshments
WOMEN'S.ATHLETIC BLDG.
everyone welcome
50c

ENDING TONIGHT
Shows at
1:00-3:30-6:15-8:50
Feature 20 Minutes Later

g

U -
This Weekend ,
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U,
CINEMA GUILD!
presents
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CHARLIE CHAPLIN ,
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THE GOLD RUSH

DIAL 8-6416
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cut as a diamond"
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Rene
with ALAIN DELON
IF YOU NEVER SEE ANOTHER FILM
YOU MUST SEE "MONDO CANE,"
THE MOST EXCITING, SHOCKING
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July 2T-24

THE PRIVATE EAR and
THE PUBLIC EYE
by Peter Schaffer

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August 4-7

I

I

MEASURE FOR MEASURE
by William Shakespeare

August 11-14
An Opera to be announced

I

I

I I II

I

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