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August 30, 1966 - Image 76

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-08-30

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY .

TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1966

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY. AUGUST 30. 1966

ti _.._ _ , ._ . , ._. . _ .,.., _., ....

DR. RICHARD CUTLER

WILBUR K. PIERPONT

DR. NIEHUSS

ALLAN SMITH

GILBERT L. LEE, JR.

MICHAEL RADDOCK GEOFFREY NORMAN

Seven Ui
By MARTHA WOLFGANG
In an organization as massive
and diverse as the University of
Michigan, administrative tasks
must be departmentalized. While
the University President is primar-
ily interested in an overall view
of the University, each of the
vice-presidents -develops an ex-
pertise in his appointed field.-
The University presently has
five vice-presidents. This year a
sixth was appodnted, but the exact
position of the office is not clear
as it is still in the process of
breaking off from its parent de-
partnent.
THE EXECUTIVE VICE-PRES-
IDENT. The position of executive

[niversity
vice-president was established in
1962 by the Regents of the Uni-
versity. Marvin L. Niehuss was
chosen to fill the post, and pres-
ently he still holds the position.
The executive vice-president
serves as a deputy to the Presi-
dent. He is the chief assistant to
President Hatcher, and when the
President is away, Mr. Niehuss
assumes command.
Niehuss joined the University
faculty in 1927 as an instructor
in the school of business admin-
istration. In 1936 he became an
associate professor in the Law
School. Eight years later he was
appointed vice-president for Uni-
versity relations. In 1951, he was

Vice-Presidents:

Departmentalized

Tasks

named as dean of faculties of the
University.
Niehuss holds a bachelor's and
law degree from the University.
Much of Niehuss' work is done
in Lansing. He represents the
University in the Coordinating,
Council for Higher Education. He
supervises the University's rela-
tionship with the state Legisla-
ture, and is an integral part in
the presentation of the Universi-
ty's state budget requests before
the proper committees in Lans-
ing.
THE VICE-PRESIDENT FOR
STUDENT AFFAIRS. This rela-
tively new position is one of the
most dynamic of all the vice-pres-
idential offices. It is presently
held by Richard Cutler.
Since taking office in Decem-
ber, Cutler has abolished hours;
for junior women, and passed
new regulations allowing women
of junior standing to live in Uni-
versity approved apartments. He
has given wholehearted support
to various student organizations of '
every scope, and broke precedent,
by publicly commending the ac-
tiviies of the Student Non-violent
Coordinating Committee.'
Cutler attended Western Mich-
igan University, and received his
master's from the University in
1951. He formerly taught psy-1
chology at the University and re-1
ceived his doctorate in clinical
psychology in 1953.1

His major interests have been
the general area of mental health,
personality theory and develop-
mental psychology.
Cutler was appointed a mem-
ber of the state mental health
commission by Gov. John Swain-
son. -
The Office of Student Affairs
is charged with administering all
the non-academic aspects of stu-
dent life at the University. Cut-
ler's office is responsible for such
varying functions as religious ac-
tivities, the placement bureau,
housing and student organizations.
THE VICE-PRESIDENT FOR
ACADEMIC AFFAIRS.
Vice-President Allan Smith
heads the Office of Academic Af-
fairs and bears the responsibility
for coordinating the academic
world at the University. He con-
fers with the other administrators
on plans for University growth.
The deans of the schools and
colleges report to Vice-President
Smith. All the faculty of the Uni-
versity is hired through his office,
as well as faculty promotions.
Smith acts as the coordinator for
all the academic areas of the Uni-
versity.
Smith's department prepares the
academic portions of the budget
which is presented to the legisla-
tors in Lansing each year. He
calculates how the money from
the state is to be spent in the var-

STUDENT B00K SC-RVIOL
Buy at LOWEST prices in town
Sell at HIGHEST prices in town
from the store that LOVES YOU
STUDENT BOOK SGRVIC

ious academic areas of the Uni-
versity.
Smith was formerly dean of
the University of Michigan Law
School. He has earned two de-
grees from our University, a Mas-
ter of Laws degree in 1941, and
Doctor of Judicial Science in 1956.
THE VICE-PRESIDENT FOR
BUSINESS AND FINANCE is cur-
rently held by Wilbur K. Pierpont.
The University nas assets of
about $350 million and spends
about $125 million, all controlled
through this office.
This office is in charge of all
non-academic functions of the
University. This includes buildings
and maintenance of all Univer-
sity buildings and dormitories. All
new building and planning orig-
inates from this office.
Pierpont's office is also respon-
sible for handling financial ar-
rangements necessary to provide
a base for the University's ex-
panding development such as
North Campus and the medical
center.
Pierpont assumed his post in
1951, at which time he was also
named a professor of accounting
in the business school. Previously
he had been the controller of the
University since 1947.
In April of this year, Gilbert L.
Lee, Jr. was named vice-president
for business. He was the former
controller of the University. The
change in the business and finan-
cial operation of the University is
a result of the expanding struc-
ture of this office. Growth of the
University's research programs,
and a large building program, now
underway, as well as continuing
growth of the educational pro-
grams and auxiliary enterprises
have caused a great expansion in
the duties and responsibilities of
the business and financial offices.
Lee has immediate direction of
these functions, formally under
Pierpont: controller, personnel,
operations, plant operations, serv-
ice enterprises, purchasing, and
management services. The division
between the two offices are not
firmly arranged. the two vice-pres-
idents will be working very close-
ly with one another.
Lee had been controller of the
University since 1951. He received
his bachelor's degree from Michi-
gan State University and earned

his master of business administra-
tion here at the University of
Michigan in 1947.
VICE-PRESIDENT FOR UNI-
VERSITY RELATIONS. Michael
Raddock is the University's vice-
president for university relations.
He supervises the various de-
partments of the University Rela-
tions staff, including Information
Services, State Services, the De-
velopment Council and the Ses-
quicentennial Celebration office.
He is currently in charge of the
University's $55 Million Capital
Fund Program. The drive aims
to have $55 million in private
grants for the University by 1967,
the year of the Sesquicentennial
Celebration.
He also serves as chairman of
the University's broadcasting com-
mittee and has the responsibility
for Broadcasting Services includ-
ing the Television Center.
Raddock received his bachelor
of arts degree from Westminster
College, and a master's degree in
journalism from Northwestern
University.
VICE-PRESIDENT FOR RE-
SEARCH. A. Geoffrey Norman
was appointed vice-president for
research in the summer of 1964.
He is in charge of all the vast re-
search projects going on at the
University. As the focus of the
universities and the nation turns

towards research. It has been
stressed by not only the people
but the federal government.
Much of Raddock's responsi-
bilities are connected with the
federal government,, as the Uni-
versity looks toward it for more
money and grants for its old and
planned research programs.
Raddock not only attempts to
receive money from the federal
government, but works with the
state governments and private in-
terests in establishing research
grants.
His office serves as a coordina-
tor for all the research projects
which take place with the di-
verse fields of the University.
Raddock is currently working
with the Atomic Energy Commis-
sion in an attempt to have their,
proposed $1 billion high energy
physics accelerator built in Ann
Arbor. The Ann Arbor location is
one of six chosen by the commis-'
sion as final competitors.
Norman was born and educat-
ed in England, and holds doctor-
ate degrees from the University of
Birmingham and the University oi
London. He has served as an ad-
visor to the president for the Na-
tional Academy of Sciences. In
1965, he was appointed chairman
of the Division of Biology and
Agriculture of the National Re-
search Council.

1215 South U.

761-0700

search Council.

r-

All Accessories for BIKES

Dearborn:
University
Extension
By MEREDITH EIKER
"We have finally reached the
stage of having to cope with the
delightful problems of inadequate
housing and parking shortages."
Thus University Vice-President
and Director for the Dearborn
Campus William E. Stirton began
speaking enthusiastically earlier
this summer of the rapid growth
and proposed expansion of one of
the University's most unique un-
dertakings.
It all started ten years ago
when a group of industrial firms,
led by Ford Motor Co., approached
high University officials with vi-
sions of a joint work-study insti-
tution for educating trained, well-
informed personnel. In October of
1959, although the Legislature had
allotted the campus no state ap-
propriations, the Dearborn Center
admitted a pilot group of 37 stu-
dents.
Funded initially only by in-
dustrial money which had pro-
cured land and built facilities at
a cost of $16 million, the "Center"
has long since become a full-
fledged campus. Dearborn has de-
veloped substantial ties of co-
operation with the statewide com-
munity college system, established
a firm communuty relationship
with industry that may lead the
training programs; and helped the
University into foreign labor
University become a pace-setter
in educational and industrial
training.
Stirton explains that in 1956
"industry came to education" hop-
ing to find a cure for their three-
fold manpower plague:
1) Industry in southeastern
Michigan was suffering from in-
sufficient numbers of "quality"
personnel;
2) It was unable to keep instruc-
tion current with the rapid rate
o ftechnological change, and
ing weakened by excessive person-
nel turnover.
And they foresaw an even great-
er problem in the statistical pdo-
And they foresaw an even great-
er problem in the statistical pro-
jections of future employment
needs.
The plan finally evolved to the
University and inidustry called
for:
1) A two-year senior college
offering limited graduate pro-
grams expanding to a capacity
present a tri-divisional selection of
of 1,650 on-campus students.
Specifically the college would
courses;
2) A comprehensive policy to
help eliminate the manpower pro-
blem. Called the "cooperative edu-
cation plan," it offered an intern-
ship program for all engineering
and business administration stu-
dents and
3) A then exciting new educa-
tional venture, the trimester sys-
tem, was to be instituted by 1960.
Without tax funds, Stirton and
the University had set an example
for education-industry coopera-
tion, and, though the curriculum
has been structured primarily to
fulfill local requirements, the
school has taken on statewide po-
pularity. Extensive housing pro-
posals are currently being review-
ed by the Regents.
"We have met with a high de-
gree of success in industry em-
ployment. Students have an aver-
age earning rate of $6600 a year
(actual remuneration is only half
that, however, because of the co-
op program," Stirton notes. If stu-
dents stay on with the company
they are working for after gradu-

ation, they generally have a three
year seniority from their previous
work experience.
"We're buyers in a buyers' mar-
ket," Stirton commented. Dear-
born is adding more companies to
its lists as it develops more spe-
cialties. "We can afford to be
choosy," he says.
"We have met our major pur-
pose," proclaims Stirton, "to pro-
vide a good education in engineer-
ing and business administration
on the cooperative level." Some
liberal arts courses are now being
offered at Dearborn as well in
the realm of financial writing and
insurance, along with teacher cer-
tification.
The values to the student are
as great as those to industry, and
Stirton summarizes them as fol-
lows:
-occupational guidance. Stu-
dents experience immediate satis-
faction or disillusionment with
their chosen field. Their whole ed-
ucation is not wasted if they find
they have made a mistake.
-Currency of instruction. The
curriculum at Dearborn is always
up to date. Students are constant-
ly aware of the practical applica-
tions and aims of their courses.
-Remuneration both monetar-
ily and in potential job seniority
after graduation.
Dearborn Campus has designed
a working bridge between educa-
tion and industry, and the Uni-
versity can look on it with pride.

4.

-4
4

. A

V

The Dearborn Center is under constant construction.

I

* BASKETS
-to help you carry
things
o LIGHTS
-To help you see in
the dark
* BELLS
-To help you annoy
people
* LOCKS
-To help you keep
your bike yours
*BIKE COVERS
-How would YOU
feel sitting
outside naked?

4

*p

4i

IT WILL BE A DAM SHAME IF YOU DON'T
BUY YOUR BIKE FROM

The Dearborn Campus is "now being judged by its product." The college started ten years ago when
a group of industrial firms admitted the first pilot group of 37 students.

' ,I'

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