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August 30, 1966 - Image 75

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-08-30

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TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

TUESDAY. AUGUST 30, 1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVP~

Flint Expansion,
Cause of Conflict

UNIVERSITY LEADER:
Harlan Hatcher: The Tenth President
Fifteen Years of Executive Powers

By SUSAN SCHNEPP
The dust and noise of construc-
tion workers have been virtually
the only occupants of the Uni-
versity's Flint College this sum-
mer.
The $2.4 million expansion pro-
gram to extend classroom and of-
fice space in the 10-year-old build-
ing is one result of the contro-
versy which raged over the col-
lege in the first several months
of 1965.
At that time the college attract-
ed statewide attention when it
announced plans to expand its
two-year senior program to a full
four-year branch college.
The now dormant issue, a cen-
tral part of the heated political
controversy over methods of ex-
panding Michigan's facilities for
higher education, was for the time
being resolved when the state Leg-
islature appropriated funds to al-
low Flint College to admit its
first freshman class in the fall
of 1965.
Since its inception in 1956, Flint
College has increased enrollment
from 167 to more than 600, this
past year including about 150
freshmen. Approximately 70 per
cent of the juniors and seniors
are alumni of Flint Community
Junior College, a freshman-soph-
omore institution across the park-
ing lot which offers preparation
for further work at liberal arts
schools as well as terminal vo-
cational and technical programs.
The freshman class was drawn
mainly from Flint and Flint area
high schools. However, there are
many students enrolled in the col-
lege from all over Michigan and
from out of state.
Flint College is a liberal arts
school, offering bachelor degrees
in a variety of fields. The largest
number of its graduates receive de-
grees in education, both elemen-
tary and secondary.
It presently employs a full time
teaching staff of over 30 and an
administrative staff headed by
Dean Dr. David French. For the
first time last year a coordinator
of student activities was hired to
direct student extra-curricular ac-
tivities.
There are no dormitory facili-
ties, and it has been pointed out
that a commuter college atmos-
phere deprives students of the
opportunity to participate fully in
a college community. Also the
large number of part time older
adult students limit the number
of potential supporters of a broad
extra-curricular program.

Nevertheless, the students have
organized and actively support a
number variety of club activities,
a weekly newspaper, student gov-
ernment, and an intramural sports
program. The new freshmen have
actively participated in the ex-
tra-curricular program and pro-
vide an impetus for its further
expansion.
Although the Flint College con-
troversy still has not been com-
pletely resolved, the new building
addition, financed by the school's
chief benefactor, Charles S. Mott,
is concrete proof that Flint Col-
lege is far from fading away, and
with increasing enrollments every
semester it will become even more
important in the Flint and state
education scene in the years to
come.

By BETSY TURNER
The position of president of the
University involves many respon-
sibilities. Harlan Hatcher has held
this position and had to deal with
these responsibilities for the past
15 years. He first became presi-
dent in 1952. His retirement will
come after the Sesquicentennial
conferences to be held here in
November, 1967.
One of the major concerns of
all factions of the University now
is selection of Hatcher's successor.
In the spring of this year, the
Board of Regents created the pol-
icy they will follow in making
this selection. In his official ca-
pacity, Hatcher presides over all
Regents' meeetings. For this rea-

son, the Regents decided to dis- Students who were interested
band as a formal organization on in participating on the student

this issue only and form into a
committee. When the group is a
committee, Hatcher is relieved of
his duty as chairman and thus,
does not have to feel the pressure
of taking an active part in chos-
ing his successor.
Secondly, the Regents set up
three advisory committees. The
faculty, students, and alumni
will each have their own separate
committees. These committees,
after careful consideration, will
submit names of candidates they
feel would be qualified for the
position to the Regents' commit-
tee. Final selection will be made
by the Regents.

committee petitioned for the po-
sitions. A committee composed of
the heads of the major student
activities made the final selection.
Each committee has ten seats on
it. The other two committees fill-
ed their seats in a similar man-
ner.
The office of President itself'
was created in 1850 when the Fa-
culty felt that a specific position
was needed to take care of all the
problems and needs which arose.
The president, according to the
Regents' by-laws, must consult
the Regents in advance of any
action which he takes except in
the case of an emergency or tem-

porary appointments. Such ap-
pointments are then subject to
approval by the Board.
The president, besides chairing
the monthly Regent meetings, is
ex-officio chairman of the Uni-
versity Senate. He is also a mem-
ber of each of the governing fa-
culties of the University.
Another one of Hatcher's dut-
ies is testifying before the Leg-
islature each year to support the
University's annual budget re-
quest.
The president is required by the
Regents to make a State of the
University address. In this speech,
he must report on the progress
made during the preceeding year
and state the issues of concern for
the coming year.
Hatcher has done much to imp
prove communication between
the administration and the stu-
dents. Last year, he held two stu-
dent convocations where the stu-
dents were given an opportunity
to ask questions andn he then
had a chance to give his answers
and express views on various sub-
jects.
The subject of the first convo-
cation was the undergraduate's
role in the University. Hatcher
maintained that the diversity of
the University should and does act
as a stimulus to the undergradu-
ate rather than stifling him with
its immencity.
The second convocation dealt
with the situation at Berkeley
which was very crucial at that
were discussed. In conjunction
time. Student protests in general
with this convocation, some of
the faculty held the first teach-in
on theh subject of theh war in
Vietnam. At first, many of the
faculty wanted to disband regu-
lar classes during theh day and
hold the teach-in but they were
persuaded by the administration
to hold it during the night.
Hatcher, besides carrying on
many duties in Ann Arbor, and
the state in general, does much
traveling. In 1964, he attended a
conference in West Germany and
traveled in his official capacity to
many institutions and places of
importance.
This year, Hatcher attended a
six-day conference of education
leaders from the United States
and Japan. The conference was
held in Tokyo. The main topic of
concern was "the role of universi-
ties in developing mutual under-
standing between the two na-
tions."

PRESIDENT HARLAN HATCHER

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r Part of the expansion program at Flint College: the $2.4 million construction of office and classroom space is the result of a long rang-
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