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December 03, 1966 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-12-03

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, DECE MER 3, 1966

PA~ TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3,1966

Scientists Probe Mind-Control Student Power, Class Ranking Vth Forum Theatre Showsi
Topics of 'Talk-in' Discussion Art Films; Contes Slated
By EectriclalChemiccal Means I (Continued from Page 1) "2) Deplores the use of those
The faculty will be asked by disruptive tactics which infringe
__ , _. -- ,- _, .,_.RICHARD AYE.Rr Foreman and Reid Piere oth .

Across
Campus
FRIDAY, DEC. 2
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.-Cinema II

The research is still young,
the results incomplete. But the
work and its possibilities are
startling: control of the human
brain by the push of a button,_
or .the injection of a chemical.
It goes on in many laboratories
even while other scientists won-
d0 whether it should-because
mind control could prove as
awesomely good or bad as
atomic energy.
By JOHN BARBOUR
Assoclated'Press Science Writer,
cqntrol of the mind-of mood,
behavior and learning -is no
dream of the future, no mere con-
cocation of science fiction.
Vt is here. It is not easily, nor
lightly done. Methods are drastic.
But it is done-to individuals-
now.
A troubled man in New Orleans
"went about his daily business, met
and talked with other people, lived
a semingly normal life.
He wore 'a ap to hide the tiny
electrical sockets planted in his
skull, wires that reached deep into
his brain. When bad feelings
threatened to sweep over him, he
Simly reache d to his waist and
puffed his favorite buttoon on a
small black box. Instantly, the
bad feelings vanished. He smiled.
All was right with the world.
Fast-Paced Research
.These instances from scientific
rep6rts show howfast a pace brain
research has taken, how wide a
road it travels. Many scientists
warn that it holds for man a
greater power--to do-good or "evil
than he ever dreamed of before.
-Most methods of brain control
now are temporary in effect. Some
implanted electrodes might be ef-
fective up to three years. Most
methods require major surgery,
some operations lasting nine hours.
But some researches look ahead
tQ chemical methods, matching
the effectiveness of electrical
control.
So far some 58 persons, most
of them mental patients, have
been implanted temporarily with
the hair-like, deep-brain elect-
rodes at Tulane University. Four
were equipped with portable de-
vices for self-control, but none of
these is in servie now."
Change Mood, Behavior
The object: To read out the
electrical activity in the deep
brain, and, when desired, to stim-
ulate the same areas with elec-
tricity to change mood and be-
havior.
Dr Robert Heath, head of the
Department of Psychiatry and
Neurology at Tulane, says the
studies show that the septal re-
gion-an area about two inches in
from the middle of the nose-is
the pleasure center of the brain.
Electrical stimulation creates a
good feeling. If it does not erase
pain, it at least drowns it out with
pleasure, and increases alertness.
4t Yale University, Dr. Jose
Delgado has also had some elect-
rode implant patients. He uses a
renote control device to send a
radio signal to a miniaturized re-
ceiver worn by the patient. The
signal trigers an electrical dose
to 'the brain.
Monkeyshines
At Tulane's Delta Primate Cen-
ter, Dr. Lawrence Pinneo works
with deeply anesthetized animals
-with the aim of controlling their
behavior without the active co-
operation of their brains. By this,
he hopes to understand. behavior
by reproducing it - everything
from a monkey's facil expression
tW its climbing, grasping move-
ments.
Dr. Pinneo says he has dissected
the electrical meaning of move-
ment - and can now produce
mdvement, including the wag of
a tail, with the proper sequence
of electrical shots to the proper
targets in the brain stem area.
One day, he says, this work may
provide a computerized black box
that could make a paralyzed man
walk by firing instructions to his

brain, or make a blind man "see"
by reproducing vision in the elec-
trical language the brain under-
stands. Why, he asks, couldn't the
blind man of the future carry: a
television eye and a black box
that converts the picture into elec-
trical nerve signals to be fed into
his brain?
The work with vision has just
begun. In two humans, Pinneo and
Heath were able to record brain
electrical activity and changes
while the patients watched flick-
ering lights, a primitive first step
toward understanding the mean-
ing of vision.
If scientists are beginning to
understand the electrical lan-
guage, they are still baffled by the
more subtle chemical language
that appears to exist between
nerve and brain cells. The attack
on the brain's chemistry takes
many forms, and few of them are
free from controversy.
Challenging Tasks
Dr. David Krech at the Univer-
sity of California has reported in-
creased chemical activity in the
brains of rats given challenging
jobs to do.
One group of rats was given a
community cage and a variety of
"toys" to play with. Another group
was put in isolation. The active
rats developed bigger brains than
the deprived rats. They also had
more large blood vesselsrserving
the brains,. and more brain cells
containing essential nerve chem-
icals.
Dr. James McConnell, a Uni-
versity psychologist, found he
could train flatworms to obey
flashing lights and electric shocks.
He minced up trained flatworms
and fed them to untrained flat-
worms. The cannibals, he said,
learned the same lesson faster.
McConnell also claimed to be
able to extract a basic life chem-
ical called ribonucleic acid or RNA
from trained flatworms, and to
enhance the learning ability of un-
trained worms by feeding them
RNA.
While science tries to probe the
mechanism of memory and for-
gettery, it employs a number of
drugs to curb emotions and fa-
tigue. They range from pep pills
to trannquilizers and antidepres-
sants. But oddly, while they are
effective in hurt minds, they are
seldom as effective in normal
minds, say researchers at the Na-
tional Institute of Mental Health.
These workers doubt that any
drug currently in clinical use can
improve appreciably the function-
ing of a well-working mind-much
less control it.
But Dr. Stanley F.: Yolles, chief
of the institute, reported to Con-
gress this year that within the
next decade there would: be "a
hundred-fold increase in the num-
bei and types of drugs capable
of affecting the mind."
"With the use of chemical brain
control agents, it may be possible
to control the individual and the
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Ennux" O.CARPENTER RAD
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the delegation to go to the lobby on the freedom of individuals
masses," says psychologist Krech, of the Administration Bldg. to within the academic community,
"and to do all this unobtrusively discuss with the students plans and
and without the active cooperation for a new University community. "3) Supports constructive steps
of the citims." Not a question of Due to concern over the events such as proposed by President Har-
the future, says Dr. Heath. "It is of the past week, the governing lan Hatcher in his statement to
here' faculty of the engineering college the University Senate on Nov. 28,
Ironically, some 10 years ago I passed a three part resolution 1966."
atomic physicist J. Robert Oppen- Thursday stating that the college: The "talk-in" yesterday was pre-
heimer warned that scientists "1) Affirms the role of reason- ceded by a noon rally on the
who work with the mind would ed and responsible activity by all Diag where those assembled de-
face responsibilities greater by far members of the University com- cided to carry on their discussion'
than any carried by the men who munity in the resolution of Uni- in the lobby of the Administra-
fashioned the atomic bomb. versity problems; tion Bldg.
CLAIM CHINA-U.S. PPLOT:
Moscow Propaganda Attacks
Allege China Border Incident

*nAtfl4A fL CAM I Un Z

submitted the name ACT V.

"No Neon signs, no flashing
lights," the Vth Forum will be dif-
ferent from any other commercial
theatre in Ann Arbor. The new
motion picture theatre, indepen-
dent of the Butterfield chain, will
open December 9 at 210 S. Fifth.
A schedule of "quality films" will
be shown in the "Campus Theatre
style ... only better," according to
one of the owners Bill Conlin,
(along with Roger Robinson and
Tom Lacey.) Theyalso expect to
include 11 p.m. showings if there
is a strong enough demand for
them.
"V" seems to be the mode of the
new enterprise whose owners ran
a contest five weeks ago to de-
termine a name for the building.
The first prize was a five trip to
Bermuda for two, awarded to Ted
Kennedy of 2729 Hampshire. Mr.
Kennedy's contribution was the
name Vth FORUM. The second
and third placet winners, Bob

Set in an intimate atmosphere presents "Topkapi" in Aud. A.
with a seating capacity of 550. first 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.-Ron Rice's
night audiences will view "A Mar- "The Flower Thief": Architecture
ried Woman," Jean-Luc Goddard's Aud.
recent film. Included on the forth- 8:00 p.m.-Tennessee Williams'
coming enticing schedule are such "Camino Real": Trueblood Aud.
films as "Gambit" and "A Man 8:00 p.m.--Gilbert and Sullivan
and A Woman." Society presents H.M.S. Pinafore
The owners do not feel that they in Mendelssohn Theatre.
will be detracting from the busi- 8:30 p.m.-University Musical
ness of local theatres. Society Concert. Handel's "Mes-
"Ann Arbor is big enough so siah": University Choral Union
that it can certainly use one more and Interlochen Arts Academy
movie theatre without any trou- Orchestra: Hill Aud
ble." SATURDAY, DEC. 3
Neither does there seem to be 7:00 and 9:00 p.m,-Cinema II
resentment from other theatres or presents "Topkapi" in Aud. A.
film groups in the community. 7:00 and 9:05 p.m. -Cinema
Ellen Frank, chairman of Cine- Guild, Buster Keaton's "Sherlock
ma Guild said, "There is certainly Junior": Architecture Aud.
a gap to be filled by a new theatre. 8:00 p.m.-Tennessee Williams'
Important current films cannot be "Camino Real": Trueblood Aud.
handled by just one theatre (Cam- 8:30 p.m.-Handel's "Messiah,"
pus) and Cinema Guild and Cine- University Choral Union and In-
ma Ihare busytrying to catch up terlochen Arts Academy Orches-
on the backlog." tra : Hill Aud.

0

MOSCOW (P)-China has been long boreder with China is thinly
trying to occupy some Soviet fron- defended. Unconfirmed reportsl
tier territory and has staged bor- now tell of troop buildups there.
dlp nrv tinn thp Rnvip nnlp

aer provocations, ne ovie people
are being told in semipublic meet-
ings.
Informed sources who reported
this today said the Kremlin ap-
pears to be trying to shift the
focus of popular emotions from
Viet Nam to the Soviet Union's
China problem.
While opinion against China is
being stoked up by revelations of
border trouble and allegations of
secret Chinese agreements with
the West, Viet Nam is being played
down.
Play Down War
The sources noted that there has
been a lessening of the number
of Soviet press articles accusing
the United States of atrocities in
Viet Nam. Photos of bloodshed
there appear less frequently now.
Far away Viet Nam has never
excited some Russians very much,
the sources said, but geography
and history tend to make Rus-
sians -concerned about China.
The Soviet Union's 4,150-mile-
TONIGHT at 8 P M.
WINNER OF 6
ACADEMY AWARDS!

Russia was conquered in the
13th century by yellow men and
long was under Mongol influence.
This, combined with a racialism
from which the Soviet people are
no more immune than others,
combine to create a sense of a
"yellow peril" now, the sources
suggested.
The sources gave this account:
Press Against China
Meetings are being held under
Communist party auspices to'
spread information about Soviet-
Chinese relations. Speakers go
beyond what has been published
in the increasingly strident press
campaign against China.
Chinese forces-it is not clear
whether they were troops or or-
ganized civilians-have crossed the

Soviet border and tried to build
installations. Soviet troops have
surrounded and forced the Chinese
across the border, but no mention
of bloodshed was heard and no
date or~ location was specified.
Speakers accuse China of having
a secret agreement with the Unit-
ed States: If the Soviet Union and
China get into war, the United
States agreed not to help Mos-
cow.
These points reported by the
sources all go beyond the latest
and strongest Soviet press attack
on China, an editorial Sunday in
Pravda, the Communist party
paper.
It used a familiar Soviet device
of calling things to its readers' at-
tention by quoting the Western
press, thus making points without
appearing to confirm or deny
them.

r

,i

I ~V

1 NEMA 11

I

presents

ME I NA

PETER

SATURDAY and SUNDAY
SHERLOCK JUNIOR
(dir. Buster Keatn- 924)
Buster in a classic dream sequence,
imagines he is a great detective!
SHORTS: "The Dippy Dentist"
"Sure, Mike"
"Safecrackers"
"Game Clear Through"
7 and 9:05 P.M.

I

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER
PRESENTS
A CARLO PONI PRODUCTION
DAVID LEAN'S FILM
OF BORIS PASTERNAKS
DOCTOR
ZHWVAGO
IN PANAVISION'AND METROCOLOR
Nights Except Matinees on
Sunday at 8 P.M. Sat. & Sun. at
Sunday at 7:30 1:30
All Night Seats Sat. Mat. $1.50
$2.25 Sun. Mat. $2.25

0

Arch. Aud.

Still only 50c

i 6 Shown aL
CINEMASCOFE . COLOR by ;7:05 & 11:15
FRAM
SINAlMA
TREVOR
HOWARD
Shown atcoIVY
5 " by DELUXE

a

ii

For Ann Arbor... a distinguished event !
EXCLUSIVE LIMITED ENGAGEMENT

m

CONTI NUOUS.
TODAY FROM
1 P.M

DIAL
8-6416

"Highest Rating!"

-N.Y. Daily News

BURT LANCASTER
LEE MARVIN-ROBERT RYAN-JACK PALANCE
RALPH BELIAMY .CLAUIDIA CARDINALS
er. PR@FEBSiONMS
A COLUMBIA PICTURES RELEASE . PANAVISION'TECHNICOOR
Soundtrack album on Colgems Records.
SMUSKET '67
PUT IT IN YOUR
MIND

Special Presentation
THREE PERFORMANCES OF THE 12TH CENTURY MUSICAL DRAMA
Patto ante
er f oined by
THE NEW YORK PRO MUSICA
in the Sanctuary of the
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
THURS., DEC. 8
FRI., DEC. 9
SAT., DEC. 10
at 8:30 P.M.
(A 75-minute performance, without intermission)
TICKETS: MAIN FLOOR, $5.00 and $4.00

0
00

AA

I

I j(J]*~

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