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November 15, 1966 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-15

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PAGE TWO.

,rHE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 15.196(r

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 15. 196~

F

MUSIC
Christian Ferras 'Electrifying'
In Chamber Arts Violin Recital

Zhivago'Sets Romantic Affair
In Bloody Bolshevik Uprising

r r- i r.+. do.,. % 1 r^ M

I

HEL UV R_2nd WEEK,
F "ome will do anything for $249"0""
peopl ,OO9

By TONI PRATT to even an untrained ear. Ferras'
virtuosity became most apparent
Electrifying is the word which in the theme and variation move-
most aptly describes Christian ment where pinpoint timing and
Ferras' appearance last night in solid technique truly brought the
the Chamber Arts Series. The music alive.
young French violinist has been Careful musicianship showed it-
drawing acclaim since the age of self in the Bach Partita No. 3 for
13 when he won both the violin the violin alone. Here Ferras in-
and the chamber music prizes at geniously entwined the many
the Paris Conservatory. Since voices, making his instrument
then,, his career has understand- sound like three, and giving an
ably increased, as he has proven orchestral spirit to the dance
himself a fine musician in every movements.
facet of the art. Debussy's Sonata in G minor is,
Ferras, accompanied by pianist in every way, characteristic of the
Michael Andrews, opened his re- composer. A lilting harmonic sec-
cital with Beethoven's Sonata No. tion opens the piece, which soon
5 in F major, better known as the shifts to a rumbling minor sec-
"spring sonata." His rich and tion, punctuated by dramatic
mellow tone enhanced every chordal outbursts. Lines are all-
theme, as it passed from soloist important in Debussy's work, and
to accompanist in a semi-rouni. here they were carefully molded
Although the ensemble was not in dynamic level to fit the mood
always perfect, the adept Mr. An- of the composition. The driving
drews was able to compensate un- third movement reaches a climax
obstrusively enough to conceal for both piano and violin in the
most timing discrepancies. Every finale, leaving the audience with a
nuance and change of motive was feeling of breathlessness.
carefully thought-out and shaded, With the Saint-Saens progra-
bringing the beauty of the work matic Havanaise, Ferras proved he

could play the gamut of musical
compositions. The Spanish flavor
of the music calls into play in-
tricate and syncopated timings,
handled with ease by the soloist.
Here also, the technical demand
was great from the accompanist,
and Andrews met the challenge
admirably.
The high point of the recital
came with Ravel's "Tzigane," a
piece of virtuostic display to be
attempted by only the most able
technician. An opening cadenza
at once indicated the exotic flavor
of the composition which was con-
Veyed by a warm and singing tone.
A demanding time for both piano
and violin follow the dreamy trill
upon which the accompaniment
enters. The flash and fire of
speeding scales, slowing lines, and
rapid pizzacato was taken with
ease by Ferras, a facility not often
shown by even the finest violinists.
It is apparent even to the un-
musical listener why Christian
Ferras has so indelibly left his
mark on the musical world, for he
is both a fine technician and a
brilliant musician.

By BETSY COHN only because the terms of life in
and HARVEY WASSERMAN which the players define that re-
"Dr. Zhivago," adapted for cine- lationship have been defined mor-
ma by Robert Bolt, has taken on ally and politically as unaccept-
the task of crystallizing the ele- able by the new, all-encompassing
ments which Boris Pasternak's state.
Nobel Prize-wining novel left to If Lean's camera work neverl
the reader's imaginatione lacks dimension, the chief fault
Pasternak wove romance, his- of the film is that its plot and
tory and social commentary into characterization do. The force and
his long narrative. Taken under pervasiveness of the Russian po-
the artistic wing of director David litical life from 1917 is captured-
Lean, the result of these elements a real human interaction between
has become a total cinematic pro- the principles is not.
duction, complete with photo- Geraldine Chaplin is masterful
graphic beauty, trite contrivances as Zhivago's wife. She is warm,
and musical acclamation, sbeautiful, in love with and under-1
Lean, as in "Lawrence of Ara- standing of her husband. Rod
bia," is more than magnanimous Steiger does a fine job of acting,
with his settings, sounds and but inherent in his role are basic
scenes, down to the most simple conflicts that neither novelist nor
yet eloquent detail. screenwriter have bothered to re-
The cold stench of a czarist at- solve. He is a middleman between
tack on unarmed revolutionaries, the state and Zhivago and Lara
the peasant village needlessly after being the middleman be-
burnt blacknwhite to charred ruins, tween Lara and pre-Revolutionary
white snow, peasants in black rags society.
failing to catch a train of the A more skillful novelist would
deepest brown-Lean paints these have drawn an inherently more
scenes compellingly. unified character for such a major
Indeed, once soldiers march with personality. There is no explana-
Zhivago (0 m a r Shariff) and tion for Komarovsky's unlikely
Pasha (Tom Courtenay) to fight weakening by liquor before Lara
on the German front, the plot of and Zhivago, no real explanation
personalities is entirely inter- for his willingness to save her. The
twined with the train of political flaws are conspicuous, as is the
events. Zhivago's beloved poetry wasting of Rita Tushingham and
becomes "bourgeois ...self-indul- Ralph Richardson in non-descript
gent" in the eyes of the new gov- roles.
ernment, and his old way of life Alec Guiness, as Zhivago 's
can no longer exist independently. brother, is another major part that
His fate is no longer under his could have brought life and dimen-
control. sion to the story, but he too re-
He and Lara meet and are sepa- mains colorless, lifeless, and seems
rated in the terms of war and re- only mildly interested in the ex-
volution, counter-revolution, defi- citing story of his brother and
ance and accommodation until the country. In a sense, he is the em-
end comes at the Revolutionary bodiment of Pasternak's view of
statue, to begin anew at the state the new Soviet citizen-a dull man
power plant where the tale is nar- of the system.-
rated. But the clumsy character of
The relationship between Zhi- Pasha (Tom Courtenay), believ-
vago and Lara becomes impossible able as a ramrod but not entirely

credible in his surrenders to Lara's
love is both poorly drawn and bad-
ly colored by Pasternak's reading
of the Revolution. To become
characters rather than mere props
in the train of events these men
needed a dimension of warmth
Pasternak either would not con-
cede or could not draw into them
Perhaps it is both, for neither
Zhivago nor Lara come alive either.
When Lara says of Zhivago "he
could never leave his home land
Russia," it comes as a surprise-
there has been no establishment
of ties between him and his fath-
erland. Nor are we ever convinced
that the Lara, whose ties to Koma-
rovsky were so entirely sensual,
could have anything really sig-
nificantly deeper with Zhivago.
As a film, "Zhivago" is a mas-
terpiece for the eye to behold. But
as a tragedy, its characters, like
the novel's characters, simply are
not adequately drawn or played.
Lean masterfully holds the view-
er's attention through a long,
rambling plot, much of it irrele-
vant to the key happenings of the
story. But if the film is never
boring it is also never really deeply
moving-its principle characters,
except for Chaplin's Tanya, simply
cannot bring the tragedy to life.

me6 Mi#Sd co~po an Presents
JACK LMMOR
WaLTeR maim au
BILLY WILDeR'S
'me ,;RThecoore
ATE
Dial NO 2-6264

f m as <
VIeDA ed Ari directed by LILLY WADIER
wrtten by BY WILDER and [L OIMOON
S eleased UfITeD RTSS
Feature at-1 :20
3:50-6:30-9:05

-. .

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
and
DEPARTMENT OF ART
Present a

'I

Felhelm, lKaufman, Lane in Battle of Wits
To Prove Superiority of their Disciplines

(Continued from Page 1)
Lane said "our conception ofj
man hasn't changed in 20 centur-.
ies." He saw man's attempts in
these years to ameliorate his con-
dition as futile because of the
failure of "the humanist experi-'
ment."
He called for an end to this
experiment and the beginning of
something new using "the tech-
niques of science."
Kaufman Notes
Kaufman, noting the humor-,"
ous vein of his competitors'
speeches, called his opponents
"positively .wicked men!" "Lane
believes great" good can. be gained
by shaping people-like rats., It is
a manipulativeway toktreat men
-also to treat rats."
"Do you want to save a disci-
ple of B. F. Skinner, a man who
rose to fame teaching pigeons to
play ping pong?" The; audience
roared. Or "do you want tosave.
a scholar of the works of Shakes-
peare-which were probably writ-
ten by the philosopher Bacon?"
Kaufman said that everyone
wants certain things - "truth,
democracy, justice,nahigher gross
national product-but "we -must
admit we don't know what is
meant by these things." Discover-
ing what these mean is the task
of the philosopher, he said.
Raise GNP
Philosophers can do more than
anyone else, said Kaufman. For
example, they do the most to'
raise the GNP. "Anxiety about
one's life leads to increased con-
sumption. We philosophers are
forever shattering consensus. We
keep people so anxiousthey keep
running to the store."
But when they get to the store,
said Felheim, they buy a paper-
back. "If you read a good book

you know all the answers." He as-
serted that there was nothing bet-
ter than to curl up in the attic
"with a box of liquor bonbons
and a good dirty book."
Felheim recalled another sim-
ilar contest, in which "Paris was
asked to choose between "wis-
dom (the philisophical cloak of
ambiguity and anxiety)," power,.
beauty.
Chose Beauty
"He chose beauty. I hope you
know the consequences (the Tro-
jan War)-but men still chose
beauty." Paris chose Helen of Troy.
Men haven't learned. Now, Lane
suggests "we choose an even great-
er woman."
Felheim said literature teaches
us about "the triumphs of man
over nature and his fellow man,"
while psychology teaches us "how
to get along with rats in boxes."
Lane's Thesis
Lane's thesis was "with sci.
ence comes power." Lane, while
representing psychology, found
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES

himself speaking for all science.
He felt men would use power to
end poverty, disease and all cur-
able ills of men.
"We are confused about how
to get healthy, wealthy and wise.
We know the ends. What about
the means."
Kaufman disagreed, saying that
the end are not clearly defined at
all, He saw philosophy as the ice-
breaker in the frozen sea of con-
sensus. Philosophy, as psychology,
provides the instruments of pow-
er, but philisophy shapes the in-
struments of power, he concluded.
All Live
The fast moving discussion, fill-
ed with barbs that delighted the
audience. eveitually reached a
more serious stage. At that point,
the three men began to admit
more of the values of the other
disciplines.
Then a questioner, who favored
Lane's argument, suggested that
philosophers were scientists first,
and therefore Lane's consuming
Kaufman might be an acceptable
end to the -problem of who was
to live.
No final decision was reached
on a winner, howeverwas Felheim
suggested that they apply for a
grant of food from the federal
government, so each could live.

Phone 482-2056
Entwnce OxCARPENTER ROAD
OPEN 5:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
---FREE HEATERS-
NOW EVERYONE CAN SE
THE MOST LOVERLY
MOTION PICTURE OF AlL TIME!
Winner of 8
Academy
Awards l IR
Best Picture. aDY
BROW Shown at 8 P.M. Only
ALSO: WALT DISNEY'S
"ISLANDS OF THE SEA"
COLOR CARTOON
(~J-aw
TON IGHT AT 8 P.M.
WINNER OF6
ACADEMY AWARDS!

GAETANE DONIZETTI'S OPERA
n DON PASQUA1LE
Q Nov. 17, 18 & 21, 22 8:00 p.m.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE 4
Prices: $2.50 and $3.00
Box Office opens Monday, Nov. 14, 12:30-5:00 p.m.

*

I!c

20th Century-Fox Presents
CHARLTON HESTON Ends Wednesday
REX HARRISON
in
THE AONYAND
THE ECSTASY n K
DIANE CILENTO
CINEMASCOPE + Color by De Luxe

JOIN THE DAILY STAFF
Presentation
DIRECT FROM TRIUMPHANT TOUR OF SOVIET UNION!
"THE BEST BALLET COMPANY IN AMERICA TODAY;'
Walter Terry, N.Y. Herald Tribune, Feb. 1966

I

I

STARTING THURSDAY
"TO DIE IN
MADRID"

Tonight's Shows
ot 6:48& 9:05

Across,
Campus
TUESDAY, NOV. 15
12:30 P.m°.-The cornet and
trumpet students will playin the
School of Music Recital Hall.
8:30 p.m.-- The Professional
Theatre Program play of the
month will be the "The Royal
Hunt of the Sun" by Peter Shaf-
fer in Hill Aud.

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered organizations
only. Forms are available in Room 1011
SAB.
Scottish Country Dance Society,
Dancing, Wed., Nov. 16, 8-10 p.m.,
Women's Athletic Bldg.
Latin-American Club, Open meeting
for discussion of problems in the uni-
versities,. Wed., Nov. 16, 9 p.m., Union
third floor. All students American and
foreign are invited to attend and par-
ticipate.
*. * *
Delta Rho Chapter of Delta Phi Al-
pha, National German honorary socie-
ty, meeting, Nov. 15, 8 p.m., East Conf.
Room, Rackham Bldg. -Pulitzer Prize-
winning poet W. D. Snodgrass will
read from his own work and his trans-
lations of medieval and modern Ger-
mantspoems. Discussion and refresh-
ments,
American Institute of Aeronautics
and Astronautics, Monthly meeting,
Wed., Nov. 16,. 7:30 p.m., 1042 East
Engineering. James Gannett, project
test pilot for the Boeing SST program,
will discuss "The Supersonic Trans-
port."
* * *
Voice-SDS; General meeting -- (1)
election of national council delegates
(for Dec. 27-31), (2) discussion of anti-
rank action, and. (3) analysis of the
"Cutler Regime," Nov. 15, 8-11 p.m.,
Third Floor Conference Room, Michi-
gan Union.

NU

CINEMA
presents
GREGORY PECK'S
Academy Award
winning performance

Leslie A. Fiedler is
. . CONTROVERSIAL
"I have heard from time to time
reports of friend separated from
friend or lover from lover by
argunents over one or another of
-ny essays."

. .

in

I

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER
PRESENTS
A CARLO PONTI PRODUCTION
DAVID LEAN'S FILM
OF BORIS PASTERNAKS
DOCTOR
ZHiVAGO
IN PANAVISIOW AND METROCOLOR

I

IN HILL AUDITORIUM

"To Kill A
Mockingbird"

THURS., NOV 17, 8:30
TICKETS: $5.00-$4 50-$4.00-$3.50-
$2.50-$i.50
at
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER
Office Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 to 4:30; Sat., 9 to 12
(Tickets also on sale at Hill Auditorium
Box Office after 7:00 P.M. day of performance)
TELEPHONE: 665-3717

Sat. & Sun.
Only
7 &9 P.M.

Nights Except
Sunday at 8 P.M.
Sunday at 7:30
All Night Seats
$2.25

Matinees on
Sat. & Sun. at
1:30
Sat. Mat. $1 .50
Sun. Mat. $2.25

,ONo IIn Thunder
Writer-in-Residence

IS ALL-INCLUSIVE!
.. If you're any sort of student
at the U of M at all,
.. If what you create may, by the
broadest stretch of the imagination,
be construed as art ...
SHARE YOUR TALENTS
WITH THE WORLD!
CONTRIBUTE TO

Aud. A, Angell Hall

January

5-25, 1967

50c

ID Required

A

I

11

11

i

Friday

Saturday

DIRECT FROM BROADWAY

*
4

and

Sunday

the

New Lost City Ramblers

8:30 P.M.
Hill Auditorium
ty I. , "Bold, Imaginative, Vivid, Daring!"
5'u --Taubman, N.Y. Times

0

11

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