100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 12, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FAGS TWO

Viet Play Secondary
Role of Pacification

By PETER ARNETT
SAIGON (--More and more,
the United States takes the lead-
ing role in the war. When U.S.
combat troops move into the Mek-
ong Delta, as now expected, the
war will be American-led through-
outh South Viet Nam. U.S. troops
already have taken the offensive
everywhere else in the country.
The realities of heavy casualties,
high desertions and wavering mo-
rale have crept up on the Viet-.
namese army forged to fight the
Communists.
Pacification Role
The mission of the Vietnamese
has become the essentially sec-
ondary role of pacification. Even
in this field, the pacification rec-
ord of the Vietnamese over the
years is leading Americans to
move in. There are reports that
25 per cent of the U.S. aid money
earmarked for pacification will be
spent by U.S. units next year. This
year they spent only 2 per cent.
The Americans are trying to
achieve in pacification a break-
through similar in scale to their
military successes against the best
North Vietnamese troops this year.
The Vietnamese are not con-
testing this American takeover of
the war. Indeed they are encour-
aging the move into the delta, the
only area still free from foreign
troops.
Vietnamese officials are also re-
portedly encouraging direct Amer-
ican participation in pacification.
Weary from years of bloodshed
that has taken the lives of 50,000
soldiers, including many of the
bravest men and the best' officers,
the Vietnamese army{ has not re-
sponded as much as hoped for
from the morale-building presence
of foreign troops.: These foreign
forces virtually have precluded
military defeat, a possiblity that
was real late in 1964 and early in
1965 when the Viet Cong launched
a series of blows against the Viet-
nemese.
What enemy bullets have failed
to do, internecine political strife

within the military has succeeded
n dong, removng many military
leaders. Not a general left in
autthority is a noted strategist.
The best generals in Viet Nam dis-
covered they fought wars with far
greater expertise than they dab-
bled in politics, and have ended
up either in foregin exile or drum-
med out of the services.
Regional Rivalries
Wounds are still open from re-
gional rivalries that have sent
whole divisions into revolt. U.S.
advisers with key Vietnamese divi-
sions around Saigon have a "coup
watch," wth U.S. officers instruct-
ed to flash a warning to the Amer-
ican high command if any bat-
talion turns up the road toward
Saigon. Vietnamese officers and
battalions are shifted hundreds of
miles away when they are suspect-
ed of scheming.
The Vietnamese military is
hampered by a chain of command
fettered with a confusing array
of responsibilities. A typical opera-
tion in Kien Tuong Province n-
cluded rangers, regional and pop-
uular forces, special forces, na-
tional police and counter-terror-
ism teams. The province chief had
command control, the special
forces ope rational control. From
there the chain of command
sprouted off to the division com-
mander, a special forces team at
Can Tho, the corps commander
and so on. Conflicting orders often
passed back down to the field.
Enterprise is swamped by such
conflicts. Operations are slowed
btcause a field commander would
rather do nothing than risk the ire
of those up the chain. The enemy
can disapper by the time everyone
in the command chain is satisfied
with an order.
This confusion has a direct ef-
fect on provincial governments,
because Viet Nam is administered
by the military. The elected pro-
vincial councils have little say on
how things should be run, and no
authority.

J
i
r

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
:. 4:} "Community, Student Government Coun-. by the following companies. All em-
cil has a responsibility to insure that ployers expect to see your file beforeI
zstudent interests and concerns are ef- the interview, Please return forms and
fectively conveyed to the University update your fies as soon as possible.
U Community. If a student organization Call 764-7460. General Division Desk.
}has difficulty in maintaining an effec- ANNOUNCEMENT: i
tive dialogue with another branch of ;lInterview on Wed., Nov. 16: H. J.
..:~aaa- ar a .. ~ emnet Cunilis hechnne troghHeinz, Detroit, z er ,Mich.Itrewn fo
-..a.... ? ...r.,.a. ... ..Xsales.grads;invited............. ..s
The Daily Official Bulletin is an boy in Absentia": Trueblood Aud., 8 ming," Sat., Nov. 12, West Council which to attempt to overcome the diffi- to4speak with representatives. Call 764-
afficeialyublica of the Univer- = .RoRchmGrdaeShoa culty. The rules described in this book- 7640, General Division Desk, for ap-
sity of Michigan for which The a.m. Chairman, S. A. Howard ,6 let became effective in the fall of pointments
Michigan Daily assumes no editor- School of Music Degree Recital-Leslie I1966 and supersede all past regulations. ON, NOV. 14-
tal responsibility. Notices should be McWilliams, piano: Recital Hall, School Doctoral Examination for Allan Wil- Procedure for Recognition: United Air Lines, Coraopolis, Pa. -
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to of Music, 8:30 p.m. bur Grundstrom, Romance Languages & 3.-- Any degree any major, for Mgmt, Trn
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be- Literatures; thesis: "An Experimental d) Cooperatives, international houses, Mktg. Res., Personnel, Public Admin.,
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding -*;Study of Interrogative Intonation in fraternities and sororities and residence Public Rel., Purchasing and Secretarial.
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday G eneral I olies French," Sat., Nov. 12, East Council halls function as approved residenc, s U.S. Army Special Services, Wash., D.C.
for Saturday and Sunday. General Room, Rackham Graduate School, at 9 for students under regulations estab- -BA Fine Arts, Gen. Lib. Arts, Libr.
Notices may be published a maxi- TV Center Programs: On Sun., Nov. a.m. Chairman, Raleigh Morgan. lished for such housing by the vice- Sci., Music, Soc, Soc. Work and Recrea-
mum of two times on request; Day 13, the following programs will have president for student affairs. Their ac- tion. For art and design, library and
Calendar items appear once only. their initial telecast on Detroit sta- Doctoral Examination for Mark Alan tivities are governed by the regula- recreation.
Student organization notices are not tions: Levensky, Philosophy; thesis: "Direct tions for student organizations as es- TUES., NOV. 15_
accepted for publication. For more 8:30 am., WXwZTV Channel areness," Sat., Nov. 12, Room 2213 tablished by Student Government Coun- Detroit Civil Service, Detroit,nMich.
information call 764-8429. "Undestaning Or Wold:nne to Angell Hail, at 10 am. Chairman, R. cil in addition to being subject to the -BA/adv."UdrtnigOrWld: ne o g degrees Architect., Econ., Fine
Oe"AB. Brandt, regulations of their respective govern- At eLb rs itJun
One." A documentary film on tutorial B._Brandgbdie Intercooperate o In- Arts, Gen. Lib. Arts, Hist., Journ., Math,
SATURDAY'NOVEMriBERgsand12n-itgr-boe seyrcoo erativaCouncitNat. Resources (Forestry), Pharm., Poll.
versities, the special relationship be- Student Government Council Approval ter - House Assembly,1Interfratemnity
twee on tuor nd oe cildandg pWork and Chem. For Art & Design,
Day Calendar how they can help each other, , events becomes effective 24 hours after These governing bodies have original
CetrfrReerho Lann.n Biology, Botany, Elec. Computing, Mgmt.
12 noon, Wa J-Ta Channel 4-"Ge- the publication of this notice. All pub- jurisdiction in legislative and judicial Trng., Personnel, Public Admin., Public
Cengrfor Reyearh oL rmany Today." Premiere of a new serie icity for these events must be with- matters concerning their member or- Rel Purchasing Rec. Soc. Work, Stat,
Teaching Fcly Wrkhp- Por m anyProf.Caecy. Pt n rts eld until the approval has become ef. ganizations. Student Government Coun- Trans. and Gen. Writing.
.ned Instruction": Rackham Bldg., 9,a.m. Prof. Clarence K. Pott and British poli-m cil retains the prerogative of reviewing
tical historian Edward McCabe consider fetivei any possible violations of its regulations. Army and Air Force Exchange Service,
"Militaiism and the German Mind." Approval request forms for student Baltimore, Md.-BA Arch. and Math for
Cinema Guild - Experimental Film sponsored events are available in Room Elec. Computing, Merchan., Personnel,
Program: Architecture Aud., 7 and 9:05 UAC Academic Affairs Committee Pre- 1011 of the SAB. PlacementPurchasing, Food Service.
p sents: "Three Men on a Raft," a philo- Alpha Phi Omega, Peace Corps mo- U.S. Army Material Command, Toledc,,
sophical sketch enacted by three of the vie, Nov. 15 and 17, 7:30 p.m., Multipur- ANNOUNCEMENT: Ohio-BA/adv. degrees Math, Microbiol.,
Joint Glee Club Concert-University University's professors, Mon., Nov. 14, pose Room, UGLI.
of Mchigan Mes Gle Club an or UGLI Multipurpose Room, 7:30 p.m. Alpha Phi Omega, Peace Corps cof- Michigan. Michigan Union, lower level.
Aud., 7 and 9:30 p.m ' Goctoral Examination for Patricia Jean fee and discussion, Nov. 16, 7:30 p.m., pall 665-6485. Six returned volunteers
Daugert, Education; thesis: "The Rela- Women's League. on campus all week having served in
Dept. of Speech University Player s Dtio t nships o f Anxiety and the Need for India Students' Association, Movie, Turkey, Brazil. Tongo, Venezuela and
Performance-Dennis McIntyre's "Cow- Achievement to the Learning of Swim- Paigham," Nov. 12, 7:30 p.m., Natural Thailand in Education, Comm. Dev.
Science Aud. and Public Health. Tues. and Thurs. C IN E I
,fi,.,.. s.....,.aar....,, ~."...:.... ..,......,. r .......'nai.B'rith. Hillel Foundation,.xTicket,7:30:p:m., Multipurpose.:Room,;UL:,
M" sales for Fiddler on the Roof and Bal- movie on volunteers in Kenya. Tues.
four Concert, Nov. 22 and Dec. 4, re- and Thurs., 7:30 p.m., WCBN, 1%7 hour
R A N I A TI N NTIC ES 'spectively, 8:30 p.m., Fisher Theatre and program, returnees will answer ques-
}?r:1JI L. Ford Aud., respectively. btions phoned in on 761-3501. Wed., Room
foe ~Dental Class of 1968, Odontoball, Feb. 13B Union, 7 p.m. coffee hour discus-
25, 1967, 9 to 1, Union Ballroom. sion and slide presentation. Any and all
a ~"'4:a a::i5li questions about testing or application
Correction in University Regulations can be directed to the Union office of;i
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially a.m. Fri., Nov. 11, Daily:
recognized and registered organizations * * * First Paragraph: PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Gradu-
only. Forms are available in Room 1011 Gamma Dlta, 1511 Washtenaw, Uni- Student Organizations at the Univer- ates and seniors make appointments by A
SAB. versity Lutheran Chapel, Nov. 13, sup- sity of Michigan operate within a frame- 4 p.m. of the day preceding the visits
* * * per at 6 p.m.-Discussion: "The Church work established by Student Govern- - -
Newman Student Association, Mass for in Society," led by a Presbyterian min- ment Council and the vice-president for ,
freshmen, Nov. 13, 9:15 a.m., St. Mary's ister and a Lutheran pastor. The Pres- student affairs under authority granted
Chapel. Seats reserved until 9a.mn byterian Campus Center will be our by the Regents. As the official repre-i
reception following mass in Newman guests. sentative of the University Student Ar Yo Red frth B

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1966
Physics and Chem. for Res. & Dev,
WED., NOV. 16-
Travelers Insurance Co., Detroit, Mich,
-BA Econ., Gen, Lib. Arts, Law and
Math. For Insurance, Home Office and
Claims, Mgmt. Trng., Mktg. Res., Mer-
chandising, Personnel, Production, Pub-
lic Rel and Sales
H. J. Heinz, Detroit, Mch.-All Gen.
Lib. Arts graduates for sales.
Acro0ss
Ca)m pits

SATURDAY, NOV. 12

7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema II will
present the award-winning French
film "Sundays and Cybele" in
Aud. A,
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
will present an Experimental Film
Program in the Architecture Aud.
7 and 9:30 p.m.-Joint Glee Club
Concert will be presented by the
University of Michigan Men's
Glee Club in Hill Auditorium.

WIA 1

cents

)AYS

ND

IELE

H. _ _ __ _ .-_._ _ _ .. .__..

Newman Student Association, Art film
ands discussion: "The Young and the
Damned" (grand prize winner at Cannes
Festival), Nov. 12, 8 p.m., Newman.
Center, 331 Thompson.
Folk Dance (WAA), Folk dance, Mon.,
Nov. 14, 8:30-10:30 p.m., Women's Ath-
letic Bldg.
Cinema II, "Sundays and Cybele"
(best foreign picture-in cinemascope).
Nov. 11, 12 and 13, 7 and 9:15 p.m.,
Aud. A, Angell Hall.
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Nov. 13, 9:45 and 11:15 a.m.
services. The Rev. Calvin Fiege, guest
preacher. Holy communion will be cele-

A RT IFII[IL)VA
L LUIS BUNUEL'S
"THE YOUNG AND THE DAMNED"

SAT., Nov. 12
8 P.M., 50c admission

NEWMAN CENTER
331 Thompson

Headache of the
Sesequicentennlial Year ?
Well, for instance, are you
prepared to discuss the famous
"fairy scene" in the all male
Michigan Union Opera of 1923,
with force and authority? Or, are
you ready to carry on a light con-
versation about the student who
burned down old Haven Hall and
why he did it? Are you set with
enough documented examples to
stay up until dawn discussing the
ugliness of the first Michigan
Coed and the relative merits of
oil the ones who followed her?
Are you prepared to listen to
innumerable old grads tell about
the glories of their Sophomore
year?
If you read the GARGOYLE you
will be.

(Academy Award--Best foreign film
of thelyear, 1962.
French with Engl ish subtitles)
"I3xhzilara tin g . . .a czee;ia tic niiracle!"
-Crowther, N.Y. TIMES
Friday and Saturday, 7 and 9 P.M.

Aud. A, Angell Hall

50c

i

.".l.,,~av.... ~ ~ .a ........ i..":. V..a ' . . . .

Officials Clash on Status
Of New Recommendations

(Continued from Page 1)
Under Title VI of the Civil
Rights Act federal agencies assist-
ing a program or institution must
investigate to assure no person
shall "be excluded from partici-
pation in, be denied the benefits
of or be subjected to discrimi-
nation" in the program or insti-
tution because of his race.
The University is believed to be
the first university to be investi-
gated for compliance with the act.
The Defense Department inves-
tigated equal opportunity prac-
tices during the summer and re-
turned to Ann Arbor to investi-.
gate University employment prac-
tices in October.
A report on the October visit
has not been completed, nor have
recommendations been made yet.
The University received $16.3 mil-
lion worth of contracts from the
Defense Department and armed
services last year.
In defending the University, Nie-
huss pointed to a number of cur-
rent efforts to increase involve-
ment of Negroes in the school. He
said that nine Negro students from
Tuskegee Institute are enrolled
with the University under an ex-
change program, up three from a
year ago.
The University currently has
eight Negro freshmen in the Law
School and the president of the
1965 Medical School class was a
Negro. Niehuss added that there
are currently 91 Negro freshmen
enrolled under the University's Op-
portunity Awards program, now in
its third year.
Admissions officials estimate
that the University currently has
about 450 Negro students, up 50
from a year ago. Total current
enrollment at the University is 31,-
000. The University is estimated to
have less than 25 Negro faculty
and administrative staff members.
"Sure, we know there is a prob-
lem in this matter," said Regent
trene Murphy yesterday. "Why,
look, we're only 40 miles from De-
troit which is almost half Negro
and the University's Negro en-
rollment is just over 1 per cent.
That's why the Regents have
agreed to try to increase the en-
rollment of Negro undergraduates
at a rate of one per cent a year.
"But you have to realize that
Phone 482-2056
Enema40*CARPENTER ROA
OPEN 5:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
FRE HEATERS-----

this is a deeply rooted problem,"
she added. "Not long ago I found,
that the University is not getting'
any Negro students from the Pon-
tiac area despite the high number
of Negro residents in the area.
"So I called up the superin-
tendent, and asked him about it.
He said that he had read the
announcement about the Universi-
ty's equal opportunity scholarships
over the public address system.
"So I asked him why we didn't
get any Negro students. 'Well,' he
told me, 'you can lead them down
to the brook, but there's not much
you can do if they don't want
to drink.'
"That's the whole problem.
These Negro kids are convinced
these programs aren't for them.
It's time, someone really made a
concerted effort to get them to
come here."

DIAL
HELD
SHOWN AT F
24th Centuy-Fox F
CHR
REX HAF

8-6416
OVER!
REGULAR PRICES
Presents
SHESTN
RRISON

Costarring DIANE ClLENTO
CINEMASCOPE - Color by De Luxe
. . . NEXT,..
"TO DIE IN MADRID"

:;:ti
(t
{
:ti
'.%'. ',
}
:;y
:": A
#

1. ~ 1 IMNI 5
-'4. , "~i h
I r.S~i
tiii N
}}C"1+ue+t

SPI

A
VERY
SPECIAL
PREVIEW -

TOMORROW NIGHT
ONCE ONLY AT 7:00

s
p

OF A VERY
ECIAL COMEDY
IN COLOR.. .
PLUS OUR
REGULAR
FEATURE
AT THE

E
c
i
x
I
I

_ _ u u. __..____

JERRY WILL ARD
ClSSiCal guitarist
and 4
lutenist
will present a program
-of4
guitar and late music
rom the
I th to 20th centuries-
VADIT, BACH, VILLA-LOBOS, etc.
door open 330 Maynard St. $1.25 per person
at 8:30 p.in. fri., sat., sun.

SUNDAY at 7 and 9:15

I.D, Required
HELD OVER BY POPULAR DEMAND!
TOM JONES

Ticket sales begin at 6:30

I.

NOW _
WINNER OF 6 ACADEMYAWARDSI
MMO"-MAYERSmACDOPO PR[1UCM
DAVID LEAN'S FILM OF'oRISPASTERNAMS
DOCIOR ZHIVAGO
IN PANAVISION'AND METROCOLOR

DIAL
5-6290

STATE
THEATRE
DON'T MISS IT!

HELD-OVER 2nd WEEK!

Nights Except Sunday
at 8 P.M.
Sunday Eve at 7:30
All Seats $2.25

Matinees Saturday
and Sunday at 1 :30
Sat. Matinee $1:50
Sun. Matinee $2.25

SAT & SUN., NOV. 12 & 13
7:00 & 9:00
EXPERIMENTAL FILM
PROGRAM NO. 1
Winners of the 1966 Ann Arbor
Student Film Festival

"EXPLOSIVELY FUNNY. GAGS COME
AT US AS IF FROM A MACHINE GUN'
N.Y. Times
"Delightf uly vicious fun! A case of grand and glorious larceny!"
-N. Y. World Journal Tribune
"Hits magnificently on all cylinders! A delight!" -N.Y. Post
"Marvelously crooked fun.-s...Cue "Good, hearty laughs!"~ NiY
"LEMMON IS THE PERFECT KNUCKLEHEAD,
a guy with a wet noodle for a spine who can't
help being sentimental about a girl even while she's
picking his pockets."-N.Y.Ti..
"HE'S FRACTURED! ...the schnook caught between
honesty and his love for an ungood woman."
-N. Y. World Journal Tribune
"lGREAT PACE SET BY JACK LEMMONYN.. os
"SUPERB PERFORMANCE. Matthau makes a fine
figure of a comic villain."-N.Y.Times
"SUPERLATIVE!" "INCOMPARABLE!"
-N. Y. World Journal Tribune -Daily News
"A GREAT CASTING STROKE with Matthau
luxuriating in the role of a shyster lawyer."-N.Y. Post
"OVERWHELMS with a whale of a comedy performance.

DIRECT FROM BROADWAY!
Mon.-Tues.,
Nov. 14 & 15
8:30 P.M.
Hill Auditorium
"Bold, Imaginative, Vivid, Daring!"
-Taubman, N.Y. Times

4'

11

NOW EVERYONE CANSE
THE MOST LOVELI
MOTINPISTDE F L MEI

lit

1 ;;" 9A ...::

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan