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November 10, 1966 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-10

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1966

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10. 1966

Republicans Win Majority in State Senate,
Gain Seats To Split House with Democrats

By The Associated Press son and.Conrad have taken an ac-
DEROIT -- Republicans took tive interest in higher education
control of the Legislature Tues- during the two last years.
day, recouping their 1964 losses in New Faces
a stunning comeback that matched Even had no incumbents been
their wildest expectations. defeated, there would have been
They took over the Senate 20-18 at least 19 new faces in the Legis-
and defeated 18 House members to lature-five in the Senate and 14
win a 55-55 stand off in that in the House. These changes were.
chamber. Five Democratic sen- due to political ladder-climbing,
ators went down in defeat. retirements, and one death.
The Republican resurgence, at- Tusesday's election results also
tributed mainly to Gov. George reflected the return of Republican
Romney's landslide victory, top- vdters to their pre-1964 voting
pled Democrats from a 73-37 ma- patterns.
jority in the House and a 23-15 An important change in the
lead in the Senate. Republican Senate ranks will be
Republicans had talked hope- the resignation of Sen. Emil Lock-
fully of picking up four seats in wood (R.-St. Louis) as minority
the Senate and about 11 in the leader.
House. Sen. Thomas Schweigert (R-
It was not clear yesterday what Petoskey), now minority floor
would happen to the House lead- leader, would be a leading candi-
ership, but observers predicted date for Lockwood's position.
that Rep. Joseph Kowalski (D- Election Victors
Detroit) would not be able to keep Here are the candidates elected
his job as speaker. The speaker, to the Legislature Tuesday:
normally the leader of the major- Senate: 1st - Fitzgerald .(D);
ity party, controls committee 2nd - Youngblood (D); 3rd -
chairmenship appointments. With Rocycki, (D); 4th - Young (D);
an even Republican-Democratic 5th - Cartwright (D); 6th -
split, which party will be able to Basil Brown (D); 7th - Dzendzel
exert control remains an epen (D); 8th - Michael O'Brien (D).
question. 9th - Novak (D) ; 10th - Craig
Among incumbent Democrats (D); 11th McCauley (D); 12th -
defeated Tuesday are Sen. lEdwar Beebe (R); 13th - Faust (D);
Robinson of Dearborn, and Reps. 14th - Guhn (R); 15th - Levin
Einar Earlandsen of Escanaba, (D); 16th - Huber (R); 17th -
Charles Conrad of Jackson and Lodge (R); 18th - Bursley (R);
Charles Gray of Ypsilanti. Ear- 19th - Fleming (R).
landsen, a House member since 20th - DeMaso (R); 21st -
1949, has been chairmen of the Stamm (A); 22nd - Zollar (R);
important Ways and Means com- 23rd - Volkema (R); 24th -
mittee for two years, and Robin- Hungerford (R); 25th - Rockwell
Gilels' Liszt Recital
Stirs Audience at Hill

(R); 26th - Bowman (D); 27th
- Gray (D); 28th - Beadle (R);
29th - Lane (D).
30th - Lockwood (R); 31st -
VanderLaan (R) ; 32nd - Zaag-
man (R); 33rd - Bouwsma (R);
34th - Hart (D); 35th - Rich-
ardson (R); 36th - Toepp (R);
37th - Schweigert (R); 38th -
Mack (D).
Representatives
House: 1st - Waldron (R); 2nd
- Karoub (D) ; 3rd - Ryan (D) ;
4th - Fitzgerald (D); 5th - E.
D. O'Brien (D) ; 6th - Mahoney,
(D) ; 7th - Stopczynski (D) ; 8th
- Bradley (D); 9th - Ferguson
(D); 10th - Holmes (D); 11th -
White (D); 12th - Edwards (D);
13th - Novak (D); 14th - Hood
(D); 15th - Faxon (D); 16th -
Hunsinger (D); 17th - Stevens
(R); 18th - Walton (D); 19th -
Kowalski (D); 20th - Montgom-
ery (D); 21st - G. F. Montgome-
ry (D).
22nd - Elliott (D); 23rd -
Vaughn (D) ; 24th - Del Rio (D) ;
25th - Wierzbicki (D); 26th -
McNeeley (D); 27th - Copeland
(D); 28th - Anderson (D); 29th
- Sheridan (D); 30th - Symons
(D) ; 31st - McColough (D).
32nd - Pilch (D.) 33rd-Young
(D); 34th - Bennett (D); 35th -
Schmidt (R) ; 36th - Tierney
(D); 37th - Petitpren (D); 38th
- Mahalek (D); 39th - Kehres
(D) ; 40th - Stites (R) ; 41st -
Marshall (R); 42nd - Strang
(R); 43rd - Pears (R); 44th -
Stacey (R); 45th - Heize (R);
46th - Weber (R):; 47th - C.
Root (R); 48th - Groat (R);
49th - Folks (R).
50th - Ziegler (R) ; 51st-
Sharpe (R) ; 52nd - Smith (R) ;
53rd -Smit (R); 54th - E. V.
Root (R); 55th - Farsnworth
(R); 56th - Warner (R); 57th -
Brown (R) ; 58th - Pittenger
(R) ; 59th - Davis (R) ; 60th -
Smart; 61st - Anderson (R) ;
62nd - Law (D); 63rd - Bishop
(R); 64th - Baker (R); 65th -
Hampton (R); 66th - Huffman
(D).
67th - Iramer (D); 68th -
Hayward (R);m69th - Cooper
(D); 70th - Kensey (D); 71st -
Rush (R) ; 72nd - Goemaere (D) ;
CINEMA UI
presents
SUNDAYS.
AND
CYBELE
(ACADEMY AWARD-
BEST FOREIGN FILM
OF THE YEAR, 1962)

73rd - Clark (D); 74th - Snyder
(D); 75th - Nunneley (R).
76th - Jowett (R); 77th -
Hoffman (R); 78th - Spencer
(R) ; 79th - Smith (R) ; 80th -
Suski (D); 81st - Kildee (D);
82nd -Horrigan (D); 83rd -
Calahon (D); 84th - Rohlfs (R);
85th - O'Neill (D); 86th - Little
(R); 87th - Woodman (R); 88th
- Allen (R); 89th - Powell (R));
90th - Buth (R); 91st - Ford
(R); 92nd - S. J. Davis (D);
93rd - Kok (R) ; 94th - Kolder-
man (R); 95th - De Stigter (R);
96th - Beedon (D).
97th - Geerlings (R); 98th
Cawthorne (R); 99th - Holbrook
(R); 100th - Strange (R); 101st
- Traxler (D); 102nd - Prescott
(R) ; 103rd - Tisdale (R); 104th
- Engstrom (R); 105th - Swal-
low (R); 106th - R. W. Davis
(R); 107 - Varnum (R); 108th
- Jacobetti (D); 109th - Gin-
grass (D); 110th - Hellman (D).

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classical guitarist and lutanist

the program will consist of selections
from lute and guitar pieces from the
12th to the 20th centuries, including
Vadit, Bach, and Villa-Lobos

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330 Maynard Street

fri., sat., sun.

8:30 pm'

$1.25 per person

Held Over 2nd Week!

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REX HARRISON
i
THE AGONY AND
THE ECSTASY
Co samiflg
DIANE CILENTO
C " "SCOP E color by [e Luxe

I. WINNER 0F 6
ACADEMY AWARDS!

By JOHN NOUAND
To a capacity audience of en-,
thusiastic music lovers the world
famous pianist, Emile Gilels, gave
an exciting concert performance
in Hill Auditorium Tuesday night.
This American concert series
marks the sixth visit to the United
States for the internationally
hailed musical celebrity.
The program lent a musical
spectrum that covered selections
of the greatest technical difficulty
and tonal control. Beethoven's
Sonata inA major, No. 28, Op.
101, the Schumann :Presto appas-
sianato, and Nachtsucke Op. 23,
terminated with the brilliant Liszt
Sonatain B minor gavelisteners*
a more than complete evening of
instrumental pleasure.
The Lizt Sonata was, by virtue
of the standing ovation that last-
ed for several minutes, the mas-
terpiece everyone had come, to
hear. It is probably (Liszt's)
greatest work and certainly the
last great piano sonata of the 19th
century. The rhythmic, melodic
and pianistic wealth of invention
in this sonata, especially its har-
monic audacity, is immeasurable.
It has so much to say through
the darkness of its many con-
trasting moods that it challenges
the giants and murders mediocrity
among pianists. Gilels captured
the high vaulting imagination of
'the work completely. His im-
peccable phrasing and delicate
handling of countless mechanical
hurdles expressed the conviction
that his art was the greatest of
arts and the piano the greatest
of instruments.

Gilels played a Scriabin Etude
and a selection from the Visions
fugitives Op. 22, by Prokofiev for
his encores. This imaginatively
completed the concert-a concert
skillfully arranged by the artist to
include piano scores chronologic-
ally ranging from the classical era
through to the present. A per-
formance of extreme dimention
it presented the maestro at his
very best.

Premiere
Production!
COWBOY
IN ABSENTIA
by
Dennis McIntyre
University Players
in Cooperation
with the
Dept. of English

~i~i~i~jDIAL
8-6416
HELD-OVER 2nd WEEK!
"EXPLOSIVELY FUNNY. GAGS COME
AT US AS IF FROM A MACHINE GUN'
-N.Y. Times
"Delightfully vicious fun! A case of grand and glorious larceny!"
-N. Y. World Journal Tribune
"Hits magnificently on all cylinders! A delight!" -N.Y.Post
"Marvelously crooked fun.'Lia ne "Good, hearty laughs!"Dy
"LEMMON IS THE PERFECT KNUCKLEHEAD,
a guy with a wet noodle for a spine who can't
help being sentimental about a girl even while she's
picking his pockets."N.Y.
"HE'S FRACTURED! ...the schnook caught between
honesty and his love for an uIgood woman."
-N.Y.World Journal Tribune
"GREAT PACE SET BY JACK LEMMON"-N. Y. Post
"SUPERB PERFORMANCE. Matthau makes a fine
figure of a comic villain."-N.Y. Times
"SUPERLATIVE!" "INCOMPARABLE!"
-N.Y.World Journal Tribune -Daily News
"A GREAT CASTING STROKE with Matthau
luxuriating in the role of a shyster lawyer."-N.Y. Post
"OVERWHELMS with a whale of a comedy performance.
Maliciously funny portray3l." -Cue Magazine
l~ IIC OPT~ re.e ih adfldrack iem man , BILLY WILDefi'S RON RICH C~ff OSMOD JUDI WEST
WaLTRmiaUM THeeFORTUJ iea COOK e
rIi elscdtfhl ,TED ARTISTS A PHALANX AEM PRODD CTg
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Pink Panther Cartoon,

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METRO-G[WYN-MAYER,,-. A CARPONi PRODUC0lN
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ROBERT BOLT DAVID LEAN IN PANAVISION' AND METROCOLOR
STARTS FRIDAY, NOV. 11th

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Encils a stamped, ueff-addris~isedaopt

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All Nights Except Sunday
at 8 P.M.
Sunday Night at 7:30
All Nights $2.25

Matinees Saturday
and Sunday Only
at 1:30
Saturday Matinee $1.50
Sunday Matinee $2.25

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TONIGHT
through
Saturday
8 P.M.
TRUEBLOOD
AUDITORIUM

"Exhilarating . . . a
cinematic miracle!"
-Crowther, N.Y. Times

I FRIDAY and SATURDAY

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7 and 9 P.M.
Aud. A, Angell Hall
ID required 54c

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HELD OVER!

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"FRANCE & DE GAULLE"

Tom Jones
SUNDAY-7 & 9:15
Ticket Sales Begin at 6:30

A completely informal discussion
with an outstanding professor
ROY PIERCE
Come and enjoy the informal,
relaxed atmosphere of our coffee house.
A perfect opportunity to meet some
very interesting people.

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1421 Hill Street

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802 Monroe
FRIDAY NOON LUNCHEON
25c
Series:
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s DIRECT FROM BROADWAY!
Mon.-Tues.,
Nov. 14 & 15
8:30 P.M.
P. r Hill Auditorium

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