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November 09, 1966 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-09

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 9, 1966

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1966

'ANOMIE' ON CAMPUS:
Student Alienation: Frustrated Ideals, Isolation

Collegiate Press Service
WASHINGTON, D.C.-A recent
study of students at a large com-
muter school declared that stu-
dents :become "progressively more
alienated from the University" as
they move through their academic
careers.
Four chancellors from'the Uni-
vtersity. of California, however, re-
ferred to student alienation re-
cently as "'the great cliche."
Prof. Arthur Blumberg, educa-
tional psychologist at Temple Uni-
versity in Philadelphia, suiveyed
400. students there on their feel-
ings about "belonging to a large

organization." The results indi-
cated that feelings of "anomie"
(which the study defined as "lack-
ing a sense of direction") increas-
ed from freshman to senior years."
Temple Study
The Temple study attributed
student alienation to several con
ditions: difficulty in communica-
ting with faculty; impersonal re-
lationships with other students;
and the failure of the university
to live up to its purposes as stated
in the catalogue.
Another reason is the emphasis
on career planning, which causes
students to see college as only an-
other hurdle before they can do

what they feel is really meaning-
ful, the report said.
On the West Coast, however, the
chancellors of the University of
California at Berkeley, Los An-
geles, Irvine, and Davis dismissed
the claim of student alienation
during a television program last
month.
Nonsense
Chancellor Franklin D. Murphy
from UCLA said "there is more
nonsense mixed up in this than
anything else."
Most students, Murphy said,
come to college "with one foot in
adolescence and the other in ma-
turity. When making a step up,

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Dropout Problem May Reflect
Fault of Schools, Unmet Needs

you're bound to be standing on
one foot."
He recounted that when he was:
in college he found it valuable to
be on his own. "Loneliness and
travail" were part of the college
experience.
Easy Route
"You should not fool students,"
Murphy said, "that there is an
easy route to an education."
Talking about the overwhelming
numbers of students now in col-j
lege. Chancellor Daniel Aldrich,
Jr., of Irvine said, "I'm not satis-
fied that a student in a large classt
with a competent professor is any
worse than off than a student sit-
ting in a small class with an in-
competent teacher."
Another California educator de-
clared that the idealism students
had is beginning to curdle. Joel P.
Smith, Associate Dean of Students
at Stanford University, said that
students are increasingly frus-
trated in their attempts at social
reform at the national level and
a.re particularly incensed when
colleges refuse to accept their sug-
gestions.
Sensible Changes
Speaking before Stanford stu-
dents, Smith urged administrators
to "pay attention and make chan-
ges that are sensible."
He cited foul reasons for the
loss of idealism in today's college
students:

-Students r e s e n t President
Johnson. "You simply can't exag-
gerate the impact of President
Kennedy's assassination on the
young idealists now in college."
-The Viet Nam war is "ulti-
mately obnoxious to most activ-
ists."
-Students feel they are being
elbowed out of the civil rights
movement, both by massive inter-
vention of new 'federal programs
and by the rise of black power.
-Students resent the notion
that the reason to go to college is
to make money. "Activists see
American society as disproportion-
ately preoccupied with economic
success."

DIAL 8-6416
TONIGHT AT 6:48 and 9:05
SPECIAL
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CHARLTON HE N
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AN OPEN FORUM
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with: Captain Wmn. Pscoe, U.S. Selective Se vice
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Collegiate Press Service
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa.-The
fact that a significant percentage
if high school dropouts tested by
a Pennsylvania,, State. University
professor showed a high degree of
intellectual ability has led him to
wonder whether much of the
dropout problem is the fault of
the schools and not the students.
Studying 'a sample of the 7.8
per cent of all school dropouts in
Pennsylvania with IQ's of 110 or
better,D Dr Joseph L. French found
that the dropouts were "fairly
sounid individuals."
Compared with a similar sample
of high school persisters, however,
the intellectual dropouts differed
in personality, interests, educa-
tional skills and family orienta-
tion.:
Remain in School.
They also differed from drop-
outs of lesser ability in that they
remained in school longer. Forty

per cent of those studied left in
the eleventh grade, thirty-five in
the twelfth. Many more of them,
85 per cent, were now employed
full-time.
Compared with those who re-
main in school, the intellectual
dropouts were by nature less in-
hibited and more happy-go-lucky.
They were also more independent,
unconventional and rebellious.
Their homes had been more per-
missive and less protective.
Of the girls who had left school,
68 percent had done so because
of pregnancy ,and/or marriage.
They seemed, on the whole, more
shy and retiring than the others.
Compare Attitudes
In comparing the attitudes and
interests of the dropouts with
those of the persisters, the investi-
gators concluded that differences
were mainly in degree not kind.
The boys who had quit school felt
it was stifling their individualism.
As one youngster put it

"My personal opinion is thatI
schools are being run more likej
factories with the end product a
person designed like the school
thinks he should be. If a student
doesn't match. up to what the
school wants, he is not given halfc
the chance of a student who is t
making the grades and is con-
forming."
Unmarried girls who left school1
seemed less estranged from the
teachers than did the boys, but
both groups expressed the feeling
that school was not meeting their
needs.%
Mechanical Interests
The study, according to French,
uncovered significant differences
between dropouts and persisters inj
several vocational areas. The for-
mer expressed greater interest in
mechanical activities - machine
operation and design, or home re-
pair of machinery and electronic
gadgets.
Persisters were more apt to
choose medical-related activities,
and showed more interest in such
cultural activities as art, music,
and writing.
Married dropouts preferred of-
fice work, while female persisters!
gave a larger share of their atten-
tion to cultural and aesthetic ac-
tivities.
Aspirations
Interests are often reflected by
aspirations, French said. Of the
male dropouts, only 22 per cent
anticipated a professional career
as opposed to a trade, while the
figure for the persisters stood atj
60 per cent. Ninety per cent of
the former, however, said they
were interested in eventually fur-
thering their education.I
.... . . . . I

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Colo'ado U Again Attempts
TBlock Coed's Legal Suit

Collegiate Press Service
BOULDER, Colo.-University of
Colorado coed Jacalyn Dieffen-
derfer's transcript may always
record an unwanted "F" if the
University succeeds 'in its latest
strategy to block her legal suit de-
manding a grade change.
Miss Dieffenderfer received the
grade this summer for allegedly
cheating on an examination. Be-
cause a University Disciplinary
Committee considered the case
and did not find her guilty, she
maintains that the school is un-
lawful withholding the "B" she
otheriwse would have received.
University law counsel John P.
Holloway said Oct. 25 that he will
ask the court to dismiss the case
because it does not fall within its
jurisdiction. If the dismissal is re-
fused, 'olloway said that he will
then .argue the case on its own
merits..
Dismiss Suits
The court may possibly dismiss
the suits against some of the de-
fendants but not against others.
Really, the only party involved in
this thing is the professor," Hol-
loway added.

The actual defendants in the
case are University President
Joseph R. Smiley, Arts and Sci-
ences Dean William E. Briggs, Ad-
missions and Records Dean David
B. Muirhead, Registrar William
A. Douglas, and the instructor,
Kaye Bache.
Holoway said Miss Dieffenderf-
er's lawyer is arguing her suit on
the grounds that the defendants
have infringed upon her life, liber-
ty and property rights.
Since the "F" she received for
supposed cheating on a final exam
cannot be considered a violation
of her life or liberty, he said, her
counsel must consider it a proper-
ty right.
Though the University Discipli-
nary Committee took no action on
her case at a June 9 hearing, this
is simply an indication of insuf-
ficient evidence, he said. At the
time, Miss Bache was in Europe,
and unable to present her side of
the case.
If the court fails to grant Hollo-
way's dismissal motion, he will be
given from 20 to 30 days to pre-
pare a defense of the case on its
own merits.

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ID required 50c
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Cartoon
"DOCTOR ZHIVAGO"
STARTS NOV. 11th

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+ Use Daily Classifieds +

AWINNER 0F6
ACADEMY AWARDS!

Premiere
Production!.
COWBOY
IN ABSENTIA
by
Dennis McIntyre
University Players
in Cooperation
with the
Dept, of English
TONIGHT
through
Saturday
8 P.M.
TRUEBLOOD
AUDITORIUM

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METRO-GO0MYN-MAYER m A CARLO POI PRODUCTION
DAVID LEAN'S FILM OF BORIS PASTERNAKS
DOCOR ZHIVAGO
RALDINE CHAPIN JULIE CHRISTIE -TM COURTENAY
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produced andi directed by BILLY WILDER
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Sunday Matinee $2.25

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Wed. nite-8:30, REFRESHMENTS
ARK Coffee House... 1421 Hill St.

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ROYAL HUN
OF THE SU

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IT GOT SO BIG

WE HAD TO CALL IT

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DIRECT FROM BROADWAY!
Mon.-Tues.,
Nov. 14 & 15
8:30 P.M.
Hill Auditorium
:.4"P rI,JA - t ViADrinal"

At

We really didn't want to (you know, it sounds like
we're trying to sell dog food or something) but we had
no other choice. How else could we describe the fantastic
Sesquicentennial Issue of Gargoyle. (Well I suppose we

11

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