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November 08, 1966 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-08

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PAGE EIGTIT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER S, 1966

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 8,1966

Taft-Gilligan Race: Tightest Congressional Election

*1

CINCINNATI (iP) - Swiftly the
Plymouth convertible swerved and
Bob Taft took the expressway exit
so hurriedly that his sound truck
behind missed the turn.3
No one could say Taft was driv-1
ing reckle1sly. He was just anothere
harassed candidate without a min-s
ute to spare. Y
For Robert Taft Jr. is racing
for his political life against Rep.
John Joyce Gilligan, a first-termI
Democrat, in what looks like the
nation's No. 1 congressional con-I
test.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN t
(Continued from Page 2)
grees in any major for MBA and PhD
study in Business Administration.
THURS., NOV. 10-
Additional Interview: Kellogg Co. -
Will be interviewing at the Chemistry
Department Thurs., Nov. 10. For the
position of Assistant to the Directorof
Marketing Research at corporate head-
quarters in Battle, Creek, Mich. BS/MSj
in Mktg. Res. Call Chemistry Place-
ment Office for appointments, 764-7317.
POSITION OPENINGS:]
Hamtramck Civil Service Commission,
Hamtramck, Mich.-Libranian I, II or
III. Library work of increasing levels
df responsibility. For I, LS degree notj
req., BA/BS any lib, art field, some
non-professional exper. pref. 11, LS de-
gree but prof. library work eper. not
deq.. III, MLS and professional exper.
up to 3 yrs. Main library in communi-
ty of 33,000. 15 persons staff, new bldg.
Diamond Alkale Co., Cleveland, Ohio
-Market Planner for Specialty Chem-
Icals. Division. Undergrad in engrg. or
sci. and MBA. One to fou; yrs. mktg.
res. exper
Parks and Recreation Commission,
Southgate, Mich-Director, 25 yrs. min.
age. Grad with recreation, phys. ed.
or rel. field major. Exper. and trng.
as administrator or supervisor desired.
Apply before Dec. 15.
Dept. of the Navy, Resident Super-
visor of Shipbuilding, Lorain, Ohio -
Two positions. Superyisory Naval Arch-
itect, planning officer position per-
forming review of design. BS in Naval
Arch. or marine engrg. three yrs. gen-
eral exper. and 1 yr., specialized exper.
In design. Value Engineer position, Ma-
rine, Naval or Mechanical Engrg
o* *
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
21,2 SAB-,
Department of the Army-Tank-Auto-
motive Center, Warren, Mich. - More
than 500 students hired by them last
year. Good opportunities this year. Must
take Office andScience Assistant Exam.
Applications filed no later than Dec. 9
for Jan. 7 testing.
Opportunities In the San Francisco
Region-Summer jobs available, qualify
by taking Office & Science Assistant
Exam. Pick up at Summer Placement
Service and file by Dec. 9.
Camp Kohana, Glen Arbor, Mich. -
Dishdasher, male or female, kitchen
girls and housekeeping girls. Exception-
al salaries.
Details and applications at Summer
Placement Service, 212 SAB, Lower Level.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS: Make interview appnintments
at Room 128-H, west Engrg. Bldg.
NOV. 14-
All Steel Equipment, Inc.
Bel Aero Systems Co.
Anaconda Wire & Cable Co.
Boeing Co.
Carrier Corp.
City of Detroit.
Lockheed Aircraft Corp.-Calif. Div.
National Electric Coil., Div. McGraw-
Edison Co.
Power Controls Div., Midland Ross
Corp.
U.S. Army Material Command.
U.S. Army Tank Automotive.-
U.S.Govt Bureau of Reclamation
U.S. Govt., NASA, Lewis Res. Center.

This race has everything: The*
Taft name, a national political
force for four generations (his
grandad was president and chief
justice, dad was Mr. Republican);
lively, young, articulate contend-
ers, money to spend, vociferous
supporters who feel that if their
hero is drubbed then all mankind
is doomed, the prospect of a fin-
ish that could be in doubt to the
last ballot.
In 1964 only 14 of the 435 House
races were that close.
Each side has special reasons
for trying harder.
For the Republicans: Well, if
Bob Taft can't win, who can?
So well-known is the name that
on signs and campaign buttons
"TAFT" is the only message re-
quired. "The question here is," a
Democratic leader says, "how big
are those four letters."
Despite this brazen display of
cinfidence, gnawing doubts do
creep in.
After serving his apprenticeship
in the Ohio Legislature, Taft was
elected congiresman - at - large in
1962 and seemed on his way up,
maybe even to the White House.
Then, from Taft's viewpoint, a
terrible thing happened, namely,
Sen. Barry Goldwater, who lost
Ohio so one-sidedly to President
Johnson in 1964 that Taft sank,
too, in his bid for the Senate.
Now, as Taft supporters see it,
another defeat not only would be
a disaster for him, but it would
also be a major setback in their

attempt to steer the Republican
party along what they think is al
moderate path.
"There's only despair and con-
fusion on the right," Taft's cam-
paign manager, Paul Rubin, says.,
"The salvation of the Republican
party-if there is a salvation-isl
a man like Bob Taft."
For the Democrats: Lyndon B.
Johnson's success in pushing his1
"Great Society" programs through
Congress has been due to the loy-
alty of 48 freshmen Democrats. If+
Republicans can win back half or;
more of these seats--and this is
one of them - Johnson will get
little new legislation, and will have
trouble financing programs he al-
ready has.
At a recent rally attended by,
Gilligan, Jimmy Simpkins of the
Teamsters' Union put it on the
line:
"If we lost 10 or 12 seats, the
control of the House is going right
back into the hands of the Re-
publicans and the Southern Demo-
crats. It would be a shame and a
disgrace to the people of Ohio not
to send this man back to Con-
gress."
Sending this man back to Con-
gress won't be easy.
This district is the eastern part
of Hamilton County-Cincinnati.
It was strongly Republican when
Gilligan shocked everyone, himself
included, by winning by 5,411
votes in 1964. To make sure this
wouldn't happen again, the Ohio
Legislature gave the district a little

more real estate and 7,000 more
Republican votes.
"They tailor-made this district
for Bob Taft," Gilligan says.
Democrats, especially those who
are very poor, need a lot of arous-
ing before they will go to the
polls, and this is hard to do when
there's no presidential race.
"If you put them on a chart,
the Republican vote is always
there," Gilligan says. "The Demo-
cratic vote looks like a roller-
coaster. If we have a total vote
somewhat like 1964, I might be
able to shock him."
Approximately one out of five
voters here is a Negro. Taft has
invested money and time wooing
Negroes, but if they should turn
out in droves, he would be in real
trouble.
"The more people who stay
home, the better off I am," Taft's
campaign manager says.
Gilligan isn't only fighting Taft;
he's also battling a computer.
Painstakingly, the name of every
voter - and his preferences -was
collected and fed to the machine.
"You've got to go where the ducks
are," Goldwater used to say. In
these critical days before Nov. 8,
Taft can go where the undecidedf

ducks are.
Appropriately, Taft and Gilligan
stick to the classic arguments.
Taft claims he's for many social
changes, but is suspicious of the
federal government. "There is a
difference between the philosophy
of the two parties," he says.
"Creative federalism, as Hubert H.
Humphrey sees it, means bypass-
ing state and local government
and running and controlling iti
from Washington."
Some politicians around here
argue that Taft blundered when
he entered this race, that he has
little to gain and all to lose, that
he should have waited and run
for the Senate in 1968 or 1970.
Taft doesn't agree. "When you
believe as I do," he says, "you'd.
be some kind of a nut not to run."
What appalls Taft appeals to
Gilligan, who happily points to
federal goodies sprinkled on Cin-
cinnati.
"Too many people have the idea
that all this federal money is
loaded on a boat which-goes down
the Potomac and dumps it out at
sea," he says. "Why, the poverty
program alone has brought $8 mil-
lion into this area in the past two
years."

UNIVERSAL OIL PRODUCTS COMPANY
will be interviewing
B.S. & M.S. CHEMICAL ENGINEERS

on
November 8, 1966

For work in: Process and Product
Research and Development, Engineer-
ing Research and Development, Engi-
neering, Technical Service, Chemical
Manufacturing, Construction, Process
Control, Computer Activities, Process
& Product Marketing, and Market
Research and Economics.

SIGN UP FOR INTERVIEWS AT THE PLACEMENT OFFICE

P-M

I

GETA
HEAD START..
As you leave school and begin your working
career, you will be hearing about the changes that
have been taking place at Allis-Chalmers. New
products! New markets! New growth!
But why not GET THE WORD NOW, from our repre-
sentative who will be on campus. Perhaps you can
get a head start-be part of the action.
Today, Allis-Chalmers has professional career
opportunities for all engineering graduates with
emphasis on Electrical, Industrial, and Mechanical
backgrounds. Also available are unexcelled oppor-
tunities for the Business Administration graduate.
CONTACT YOUR PLACEMENT OFFICE FOR A
CAMPUS INTERVIEW ON:
November 21, 22
ALLIS-CHALM ERS
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES FOR GRADUATE ENGINEERS IN THE
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We offer challenging positions in the above areas to quali-
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machinery. The MIEHLE DIVISION is the world's leading pro-
ducer of sheet fed presses for commercial printers and lithog-
raphers, book and magazine printers, label printers, carton
plants and printing departments of large businesses.
Our representatives will be on your 'campus
NOVEMBER 15, 1966. Arrange an interview
through the Placement Office or mail your
resume to:
MR. JOHN P. MEYER.
Assistant Personnel Manager
THE MIEHLE COMPANY
DIV. OF MIEHLE-GOSS-DEXTER, INC.
2011 W. HASTINGS STREET
CHICAGO 8, ILLINOIS
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNTY EMPLOYER

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Fast-talking your parents
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Fact-talk instead.

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Tell them exactly what your trip will cost. Our free book-
lets help you calculate it.
One lists prices of organized student tours. They start
around $650. If you want to travel on your own and take
potluck on meeting people--which may be-the most fun
of all-add things up for yourself.
Start with a charter flight if your school has one. Or see
our booklet on group flights, student ships, and the bar-
gain airline.
Add low costs for getting around Britain. Our booklets
tell you about 3ยข-per-mile buses and the rail-and-boat
pass that takes you up to 1,000 miles for $30. Consider
hiking too. Wordsworth did.
Multiply the number of your nights in Britain by cost
of bed and breakfast or a room in a college residence hall.
If voii're hikingo r hiking -ount on hout 700 for vouth

with convivial British students.
And the booklets mention the fantastically low cost of
concerts and plays in Britain. You can sit in "the gods"-
galleries up near Heaven-for 750. A lot of outdoor enter-
tainment, like concerts and folk-singing, is free.
Clip the coupon. Add everything up. And tell your
parents you can spend this summer in Britain for about
what it costs to hang around the house.
British Travel1
Bo 923, New York, N.Y.10019
1 I
Namej
(Please print clearly)
ICollege

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