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November 05, 1966 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-05

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5,196(;

PAESXTIEMCIGNDIY AUDYNVMERT16

ilStU
By The Associated Press
CHICAGO -,The scrap for the
Rose Bowl berth, denied this sea-
son to front-running defending
champion Michigan State, is fo-
cused, on two contests in today's
five game Big Ten football pro-
gram.
The Spartans are currently
ranked second to Notre Dame in
the AP poll, and grid enthusiasts
are already looking forward to a
season finale clash between East
Lansing's defensive giants and the
offensively-strong Irish on Nov.
19.
With no Bowl motivation open
to MSU, Duffy Daugherty has
been pointing to the final game
as a fitting climax to two years
among the nation's gridiron rul-
ers. To maintain its eligibility for
a national championship, Mich-

Seeks
igan State (5-0) must first top I
Iowa (1-4) today.
Michigan State can cinch a title
tie by disposing of Iowa, thus giv-
ing the Spartans a 6-0 record with
only Indiana left on their con-
ference card.
The top Bowl candidates, Pur-
due (3-1) and Minnesota (2-1-1),
have road tests at Wisconsin (1-
2-1) and Northwestern (1-2-1) re-
spectively.
sIn other games, Illinois (2-2) is
at Michigan (2-2), and Indiana
(1-2-1) visits Ohio State (1-3).
Purdue, which never nas played
in the Rose Bowl, is rated a 14-
point choice over Wisconsin's
Badgers, who hope that predicted
near-freezing weather may ham-
per Boilermaker passing star Bob
Griese.
Temperatures in the 30's are
forecast generally in the Midwest.
Such readings could nip passing
and catching efficiency on the
first really cold Saturday of the
season.

itle

Clincher

Against
in The winner of the Michigan- rit
Illinois game still will have a Rose spr
- -Wn

Iowa

Margin forro
Gil Samherg

0

Surprising Minnesota, w h i c h1
bounced back from a 49-0 rout byI
Michigan to upset Ohio State 17-
7, is pegged virtually evenly
matched against a Northwestern,
team which has refused to suc-
cumb to an injury jinx.
An earlier 7-7 tie with Indiana
may be costly to Minnesota's bowl
bid since deadlocks count a half-

game won and half-game lost
Big Ten standings.

e over Ii
inging an u
dnnr n fll

If both the Gophers and the Bowl chance with a possible 5-2 w "u "'ye
Ten finish in
Boilermakers win today, their finish, although any deadlock for worst a Hayes
clash at Minneapolis Nov. 12 bowl consideration involving Pur- the conference
probably will hold the key to a due persumably would give the h n1959.
Pasadena trip, although both close Boilermakers the nod, based on
with traditional battles Nov. 19 the fact they have never gone to
when Purdue meets Indiana and the Rose Bowl before.
Minnesota engages Wisconsin. Ohio State is a 10-point favo- r s

ndiana which, by
pset. would threaten
with his worst Big
n 16 seasons. The
s club ever fared in
e was a 2-4-1 record

M *

SCRIMMAGE SHOWS INCONSISTENCY:
Progress Slow for Capers

Hapless Pitt
By The Associated Press

0T

By RICK STERN1
Slowly, gym sprint by sprint,
lay-up by lay-up Michigan's bas-
ketball team blends into a shape.
Completing its third full week
of practice, the soph-laden cage
squad held a 40-minute scrimmage
yesterday which left coach Dave
Strack with an impression of
"consistent inconsistency."

The squad was divided into
"Blue" and "Yellow" units. The
'Blue," Strack's current starting
five, included Dennis Bankey and
Jim Pitts at the guards, Dennis
Stewart and Bob Sullivan at for-
wards, and Craig Dill at center.
Pitts was top scorer with 23
points, netting nine of 14 from the
field for 64.3 per cent. He was five

Notre Dame, the nation's No. 1
for six from the foul line. Dill, football team, will be out to pad
shooting over 50 per cent, follow-:its rankings in various depart-
ed closely with 21, while Stewart, ments today against an under-
though he collected 16 points, took manned Pitt team.
20 shots to do it. The Irish, who top the nation
'Yellows' Lose Again in offense with 412.3-yard aver-
The remaining eight members of anpeffens ndta4e.-ard thr-
the squad, plus alumnus Oliver age per game and are ranked third
Darden put in the time for the in scoring with a 32.8 average, are
"Yellow." Marc Delzer's 16 tallies second only to Arkansas in yield-
set the pace while Clarence Adams ing only 4.7 points a game.
with 11, and Ken Maxey and Scott So overwhelming is Ara Parse-
Montross with 10 apiece followed. ghian's team that the oddsmakers
Darden, a step or two slow after refused to quote a spread on the

'0

a

THE
GOLLEGE
FOOTBALL
SWINDLE,
To most students football is
just a game. But to the play-
ers it's a grueling, unfair,
full-timeway of life. Saysone,
"You end up after four years
with a bum knee, talking like
a clod, fit for nothing." Now
a Florida State professor in
"Speaks Out" charges that
football makes coaches liars
and the rest of us hypocrites.
Read about his plan to'pay
the players. And about the
sly ways coaches force in-
Jured players to give uptheir
scholarships. Don't miss this
story and another on F. Lee
Bailey, Boston's sensational
lawyer with a mind for mur-
der. Both are in the Novemh-
ber 5 issue of The Saturday
Evening Post. Get your copy
today.
ANCUR1 SAMAINE
ON SALE Now

ENGINEERING OPPORTUNITIES

for Seniors and Graduates in

MECHANICAL,
AERONAUTICAL, CHEMICAL,
CIVIL (structures oriented),
ELECTRICAL, MARINE,
and METALLURGICAL
ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING MECHANICS,
APPLIED MATHEMATICS,
CERAMICS, PHYSICS and
ENGINEERING PHYSICS

an apparently voluptuous summer,
was held to four markers.
The final score was "Blue" 81,
"Yellow" 66. The overall team
shooting percentage for both
squads combined was 42.2. Free
throw percentage was a sporadic
57.5, though members of the Blue
team hit on 15 of 20 for 75 per
cent. Rebounding leaders were
Dill with 11, Stewart and Willie
Edwards, 10 apiece, and Adams,
who snatched 9.
A not so encouraging statistic
was the 49 bad passes and lost
balls that the teams combined for,
though the first unit was guilty,
of only 15.
rTer, &Tiv Ienr4srer

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Faster, Men, Faster
Elaborating on his early-season
S impression of the team, Strack
said that he felt progress had
been "average, but not as fast as
NNWNWW would like it to be. At times we
look like we know what we're do-
15 and at times we're slow."
Strack praised Pitts, saying that
the Detroit junior "will make a
be made good Big Ten guard." He also
ur pointed to co-captains Dill and
,e Bankey as doing "good" jobs, but!
said that sophomores Sullivan and
Stewart still need "to marshall
and corral their talent," adding
that "though both have been in-
consistent, both also have excel-
lent potential."
The team will be officially un-
veiled two weeks from next Tues-
day against the Michigan Fresh-
PPIlCATIONS. men. The first game is Dec. 1
against southeast challenger Ten-
nessee in Chattanooga.

game even though split end Jim
Seymour doesn't figure to see
action.
Seymour wrenched an ankle
against Oklahoma three weeks ago
and was kept out of the 31-7
triumph over Navy last week.
Quarterback Terry Hanratty,
who doesn't seem to be as effi-
cient a passer without Seymour in
the lineup, is expected to stay on
the ground with halfback Nick
Eddy and fullback Larry Conjar
doing the heavy work.
Bl Ill Iboa rd
The Michigan Soccer club
travels to Buffalo, N.Y., to face
Buffalo State today. The Wol-
verine kickers defeated State 1-0
last year.
The Michigan Rugby club, in
first place in the western divi-
sion of the Southwest Ontario
Rugby Union by one-half game,
will play Blackrock (Windsor)
today in the Canadian city.
The Ruggers first team tied
Michigan State 3-3 last week-
end while the Wolverine second
squad defeated the Spartans 6-0.
NBA Scores
Philadelphia 134, San Francisco 129
Cincinnati 120, Detroit 115

Once upon a time there was a game that tore gut from a healthy
percentage of the multitude which saw it. And it wasn't played far
from here.
I, a very partial Michigan fan, walked away from it in silence,
trying not to think about each of the things which caused this team
to lose. So many little things. And each time the mistake had been
made this team came back strong to not just hang on, but to press
hard, to win it.
They didn't. They showed that at that point in the season they
were a good team, but not a great team. Not one of the best. The best
can overcome even themselves.
So when the Boilermakers kangarooed off the field at the end
with their 22-21 win, there was a random bitterness in the grand-
stands which was provided with a focal point only by Michigan's
last play of the game.
Thinking of Carl Ward slamming that lousy ball down after being
caught from behind on the two-it would've been the long glory dash
which that tough speed demon never quite seems to get. . . . Thinking
of Stan Kemp's booming spirals-one of them hitting a phantom
wall. . . . Thinking of Rick Sygar following a fair catch down the
field, watching it like a hawk instead of taking out the first Purdue
player charging in on him, only to have it jump at him. ... Thinking
of the irony of the quarterback's instinct to move the ball as opposed
to the lineman's instinct to fall on it-and Dick Vidmer's attempt to
run with a fumble, which prevented an easy field goal.... Thinking
of the last decision . . . of how good they had been, of how easy they
had made the game look, of how well they had played, of how great
it had been to be there: . . . And choking on it you said things. "I
don't believe it. How bad can they be?"
"You know why Elliott's coaching now? So he can get really
good at messing things up. . . . Then they'll move him up to
Fritz's job."
It was only then that 1 saw something diferent, something short-
lived but very different.
It appeared that there were people who gave a damn . . . for
people.
The football team is by no means a group completely integrated
into the rest of the student body. It is the major reason for Saturdays
in the fall. It is the gravy train to the Rose Bowl, and you ride it for
all it's Worth. It provides an incompatible but happy pride in the name
of the school. It is something you cheer for and hope for sincerely.
But it is still an "It" thing. An "It" institution. Or at best
Ia non-inclusive 'Us."
And it suddenly became a "they" and "we" sort of thing. Every-
one has been a "winner . . almost" at one time or another. And so
you asked about how Rick Sygar really must have felt. About how
Stan Kemp felt. About how Dick Vidmer felt. About how Nunley and
Morgan and Clancy felt. About how Bump felt.
For about a week. It lasted for about a week, I guess. And you
could feel it when the Blue came onto the field against Minnesota for
Homecoming. The crowd had come to see the Wolverines play. They
had come to see the Blue win for Michigan, and for themselves. There
would be no Rose Bowl to think about for this year.
But they came to cheer for, to support, the men who they hoped
would get satisfaction. Prove themselves to themselves.
It was a team and, not its "fans," but its friends. Its boosters.
It occurred to me only after the Wolverines''first quick score that
they were going to be too good. Too good. The 49-0 wipe that fol-
lowed figured to put the damper to most of the emotion which had
charged the stadium for a part of that day.
But Wisconsin was away.
Welcome home!
And the team is better. Healthy, it has- what is perhaps the best
best backfield in the country. The Blue can play like the Champions
of the West. But there will be no satisfaction from the major college
polls.. .
What's left is they're winning for you, and your cheering for
them. And that's the best of it all.

.1

SPECIALISTS IN POWER... POWER FOR PROPULSION-POWER FOR AUXILIARY SYSTEMS.
CURRENT UTILIZATIONS INCLUDE AIRCRAFT, MISSILES, SPACE VEHICLES. MARINE AND INDUSTRIAL A

f

I

,

'I

0

O

r

by distributing in Detroit

"The Detroit Bar

Association Report on Judicial Candidates"

bewteen 7 A.M. and 8 P.M.

TUESDA Y,

NOVEMBER

8,

1966

Food and Hot Coffee will be continually provided.
Buses. will leave from Michigan Union at 5:30 A.M.
and will return to Michigan Union at 9:30 P.M.

A

Call

either 663-8101

or

761-6421

ii

I

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I

e . .. i -_.-

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