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November 03, 1966 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-03

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1966

PAGE SIX TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3,1960

Fisher, Vidmer Lead Pack
In Big Ten Statistics Fight
By The Associated Press while Bob Griese of Purdue leads
Jack Clancy's pass catching'! with 59 completions on an identi-
leadership is in danger. National- cal 105 attempts for a .562 per-
ly, the Michigan end is only seven centage and 794 yards gained.
ahead of the number two man, Other Michigan offensive lead-
Glenn Meltzer, a sophomore at ers are halfback Jin Detwilerwho
Wichita State, who has played one is ahead in scoring with 42 points
less game on a ten game slate. on seven touchdowns and punter
Purdue's Jim Beirne is a respect-~on emtuhosand y urder
able fourth with 48 grabs. Stan Kemp, whose 69 yarder on
ise nourth thingraocoms rSaturday helped boost his aver-
But this is nothing to compare age to 41 yards.
with Big Ten statistics where Else
Clancy isn't even leading, but is Elsewhere, the remaining Big
trailing Beirne, 31 to 30. Ten leaders are Griese with 866
Elsewhere, Michigan leads in yards total offense, Tom Schinke
four of the other seven individual of Wisconsin with a 28.9 yard
Big Ten leaderships. In rushing. kickoff return average on eight
I fullback Dave Fisher is way out runbacks, and Al Brenner of

Freshman Stars Impress Despite Loss

By ED GRUCA
Like all freshman teams, Mich-
igan's frosh football squad is "a
good team."
After seeing his team in compe-I
tition for the first time last Sat-
urday, Coach Bill Dodd said the
freshmen are "as good as or bet-
ter than any I've seen" in the
few years he has been here. This

is despite the fact that the team
lost its only game 25-14 to Wis-
consin last Saturday.
The definition of a "good fresh-
man football team," according to
Dodd, is one that will provide
needed players for the following
year's varsity squad, and not nec-
essarily containing the balance
and depth required for a winning

in front with 377 yards on 62 car-
ries for a 6.1 average in only four
league games, while the closest of
his pursuers is 45 yards behind.
The three nearest to him have
played five league games.
Vidmer Leads
Passing has become a strong:
point for the Wolverines as Dick
Vidmer has taken over the lead
with 55 completions on 105 at-
tempts for a .524 percentage. Hisj
passes have resulted in 669 yards;
gained and six touchdowns.
But the only statistic where
Vidmer is ahead is touchdowns,
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
BOB LEES

ivMichigan State with a 17. yard
punt return average while at-
tempting ten.
Defensive Statistics
Individual defensive statistics
have leaders from six teams in five
categories, and none of them are
Michigan. Iowa's Dave Moreland
leads the conference with 67
tackles, while the best Michigan
player is Frank Nunley with 51
tackles, good for a tie for fifth.
Additional leaders are Illinois'
Phil Knell with five interceptions,
and Phil Clark of Northwestern
with 12 blocked passes, while Phil
Hoag and Ron Kamzelski of Mich-
igan State and Minnesota, respec-
tively, have each recovered three
fumbles.

combination itself. Dodd says Going into the game without
that the frosh appear to have any previous scouting of Toledo.
those players that will be needed Dodd says his boys will just go out
to fill graduation gaps, on the field and play their own
Noting that the varsity squad game of football and will not be
will lose most of its offensive and especially k e y e d to playing
defensive backfields for next year, against Toledo's particular type
Dodd mentioned several players of play.
as good prospects for taking their Coach Dodd said that he was
places. Among them are John satisfied with the team's play in
Gabler, Garvie Craw, Tom Wein- the last three quarters of Satur-
man, Pete Dreshmann, Ed Wool- day's game with Wisconsin. It was
ley, Ken Wall, Tom Curtis, and only in the first quarter that the
Brian Healy. young Wolverines, in their first
He also mentioned some of the 15 minutes of college competition,
better linemen who have good were outplayed. In fact they were
chances to make the varsity next outplayed so badly that they came
year. These include Jim Mandich, out of that first quarter losing
Phil Seymour, Bill Mouch, Wer- 19-0.
ner Hall, Fred Sample, and Pete
Sarantos. By the time the game ended,
Linebackers Cecil Pryor and things evened up to the point
Dick Caldarazzo are also good where both sides had the same
bets. number of first downs and Wis-
The frosh will get their second consin led in offensive yardage
and final taste of inter-university by a mere 8 yards, 192 to 184.
competition tomorrow night at 8 Relating the first quarter diffi-
o'clock when they engage Toledo culties mainly to tightness and
University on the Ann Arbor High consequent carelessness, Dodd said
School field. that this was overshadowed by
Toledo beat Dayton 27-14 last the fact that, from a standpoint
weekend for their third win of technical fundamentals, the
against two losses. Playing in five team s play was sound.
games, as compared with one for The young Wolverines are prob-
Michigan, obviously gives Toledo ably not the best frosh team in
a considerable edge in experience. the West, but nor are they meant
Another advantage held by the to be. Their purpose is to provide
Ohio school is its excellent gtiar-|tomorrow's varsity stars, and the
terback and fullback duo. A small loss of one game does not alter
defense and injuries, however, may their chances of fulfilling that
cause them trouble. purpose.
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-Associated Press
BRIAN HEALY, Michigan freshman back, is badly harassed by a
Badger defender in last Saturday's Michigan-Wisconsin fresh-
man game. The little Wolverines lost to the baby Badgers 25-14.
AMERICAN CULTURE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
THURSDAY NOON LUNCHEON DISCUSSION
PROF. SIDNEY FINE
of the History Dept. will speak on
"THE LIFE OF FRANK MURPHY"
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The big news in sports this
week is in the world of high
school football. The mighty MAS-
ILLON, Ohio, Tigers, the most
powerful schoolboy team in the
nation over the past three dec-
ades, are in danger of losing their
fifth game in a row for the first
time in the school's long history.
From 1932 to last year, a period
described by Masillon boosters as
the "modern era," Tiger teams
have turned in 13 unbeaten, untied
seasons in posting a fabulous 296-
34-12 record.
This season, though, Masillon
has a 3-4-1 record, and their game
Friday night brings unbeaten
STEUBENVILLE to town. The
Ohio River team, top-ranked in
the state, is expected to hand
Tiger Coach BOB SEAMAN loss
number five in his first year at
Masillon.
But Seaman is traveling in fast
company. In 1932, the year Masil-
Ion lost four in a row, the Tigers
had another freshman coach. His
name was PAUL BROWN.
* * *
Moving on to the college scene,
the Big Ten noted yesterday that
slippery BOB GRIESE of PURDUE
set a conference record for total
offense in a single game as he ral-
lied the Boilermakers to a 25-21
victory over Illinois last Saturday.

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Griese, although throwing five
passes into the hands of Illini
defenders, wound up with a 19 for
38 afternoon, tossing for 288 yards.
He also slithered through the line
eight times for 29 yards, making
his total for the day 317 yards.
* * *
In the pro ranks, JIM BROWN'S
retirement has left the field wide
open for leaders in the ground-
gaining department, and Los An-
geles' DICK BASS has stepped
right into the breach. After eight
games, the Rams' top running
threat has gained 631 yards on
140 carries, 43 yards ahead of the
Cleveland Browns' LEROY KEL-
LY.
The Rams also have the NFL's
top pass receiver in TOMMY Mc-
DONALD. Though catching 38
passes, good for 415 yards, the
cigar-smoking flanker has yet to
score a touchdown. In addition, he
is being foliowed closely in re-
ceptions by PAT STUDSTILL of
the Lions. The Detroit star has
received only 37 passes, but has
gained a whopping 828 yards.
Under the NFL's complicated
system of rating passers, Green
Bay's BART STARR is now lead-
ing the league. His closest pursu-
ers are Cleveland's FRANK RY-
AN, PhD, and Baltimore's peren-
nial JOHN UNITAS.
LARRY WILSON'S three spec-
tacilar interceptions in the game
against Chicago on national tele-
vision earlier this week gave the
St. Louis free safety eight inter-
ceptions for 174 yards and two
touchdowns, as well as the lead
in this department.

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Turning from the professional
sport where grown men whack
each other weekly for a living
to the profession where grown men
take out their aggressions by
whacking a little ball on week-
ends, BILLY CASPER, who par-
layed an exotic diet and a steady
temperament into winnings of
$120,747 this year, was named the
Professional Golfer of the Year.
And now to baseball, where the
big question is: Where's MAURY
WILLS?
The Los Angeles shortstop left
the team's tour of Japan last week
against the desire of Dodger pres-
ident WALTER O'MALLEY, to
have some work done on his in-
jured right knee. Or so he said.
The Dodger's team physician
hasn't heard'from him yet.
According to a Honolulu report-
er, Wills was last seen playing
his banjo in the Hawaiian city
with a Dixieland combo.

"*

4

I

Pro Standings

1

Chicago
Montreal
Boston
Toronto
Detroit
New York

NHL
W
4
3
I
1

L
1
1
1
4

T Pts. GF GA
0 8 24 14
1 7 14 10
1 5 16 21
3 5 12 12
0 4 22 24
1 3 11 18

LAST NIGHT'S RESULT
Montreal 2, Toronto 2 (tie)
NBA
Eastern Division
W L Pet.
Philadelphia 5 0 1.000
B~oston 5 1 .833
New York 4 4 .500
Cincinnati 3 4 .429
Baltimore 1 8 .111
Western Division
Detroit 5 3 .625
San Francisco 5 3 .625
Chicago 5 5 .500
St. Louis 3 3 .500
Los Angeles 2 7 .222
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Boston 133, Los Angeles 108
Cincinnati 131, New York 129
Chicago 102, Baltimore 94

GB
2,
3
1
1
3 r

I

11

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