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August 30, 1966 - Image 47

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-08-30

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TUESDAY, AUGUST 3Q, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FAGE FIVE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVE

Honors College:
In-Depth Study

By MEREDITH EIKER
Somewhere in Angell Hall a
class will meet to contrast Machia-
velli and St. Francis in a course
entitled The Renaissance. Else-
where at the University students
will trace the evolution of stars,
the solar system, the earth, and
the life upon earth for a course
called Revolutionary Ideas in
Science.
These are only two of over fifty
courses to be offered each semes-
ter in the Honors Program of the
College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts. Between ten and fifteen
per cent of the entering L.S.&A.
freshmen will become part of this
program-the largest and most
comprehensive of its type avail-
able in the country-on the basis
of their high school performance
and test scores.
For these select individuals
whose College Board SAT verbal-
math scores are above 1350, a
truly diversified four years awaits.
In addition to the regular courses
and classes of the University, Hon-
ors sections, specially created de-
partmental courses, and courses
developed by the L.S.&A. Honors
Council are opened to them.
Characterized by unusual depth
as well as a strong interdisciplin-
ary emphasis, the Honors college
courses are often presented as
seminars or tutorials. Participat-
ing students are expected to main-
tain at least a 3.0 (B) overall'
average and a higher (3.5) aver-
age in courses in their chosen'
field of concentration.
Honors students elect two or

more sections in the Honors pro-
gram each semester and grading
takes into account that the stu-
dents are all excellent in ability
and achievement. Sequences vary
according to the individual, though
all freshmen enroll in Great
Books. Majors chosen during the
junior year may be within a single
department or may be interde-
partmental in nature.
Records show that 95 to 98 per
cent of the students receiving an
Honors baccalaureate degree (B.A.
or B.S.) from the University go on
to graduate or professional schools
or into the Peace Corps. Virtually
all of them do so with the aid of
major scholarships or fellowships.
Extensions of the Honors pro-
gram are numerous. The Unified
Science sequence, for example, is
designed to make use of exception-
al or acquired mathematical skills.
Unified Science Research prepares
the sophomore student with suf-
ficient background in laboratory
techniques to become a vital asset
to a particular faculty member's
research work.
Even special housing for Hon-
ors students is available, where a
balanced living arrangement is
maintained to further enhance
and stimulate the individual's in-
tellect. Both Frost House, named
for poet and past instructor Rob-
ert Frost, and its sister house
Blagdon are found in Markley
Hall and are open only to those
in Honors,
A freshman student enters the
Honors Program by invitation and
careful counselling is essential for
each so that his four years will be
enriching as well as challenging in
providing a vigorous foundation
for later advanced studies.
Summer academic activities are

The Honors College includes a full program of 50 courses to be offered each semester. Between 10
and 15 per cent of entering LS&A freshmen will become part of this program-the largest and most
comprehensive of its type available in the country.
ing course for credit in the field
of the student's choice and under-
gdaduate research opportunities
are both available as well as the and Friendly
usual selection of summer courses.SINCE 1929
James Boswell perhaps best
described the opportunities af-
forded by the University's Honors
college when he said almost 200
years ago, "I would have the world
be thus told, 'Here is a school
where everything may be learn-
ed'."

Counselors leave their doors open, welcoming any type of problem: academic, financial, social,
psychological and vocational. The comprehensive counseling.service is based on the principles that
every student is of concern to the University and that the initiative for seeking help and the respon-
sibility for solving problems, must lie with the student.

Counselors Perform
As Multi-Advisors

t
t
a,
,

Read
Daily
Classifieds

I

U"1

also found within the L.S.&A.j
Honors Program. A summer read- I

J

By ROBERT MOORE I
There is a bureaucracy of guid-
ance at the University with a total
of 44 different offices in the com-
munity which either counsel stu-
dents or to whom counselors refer
students. They offer services rang-
ing from academic counseling to
medical and psychiatric help.
system is based on two principles
which follow from a wider Univer-
sity policy: that every students
sity philosophy: that every stu-
dent's growth should be the con-
cern of the University and the ini-
tiative for seeking help and the re-
spoinsibility for solving problems
must finially lie with the student.
These principles work as an
interacting go-between from stu-
dent in confusion, through coun-
selor, professor, and finally to
graduation.
Roughly, the counseling system
is divided into three sections: aca-
demic counseling, career planning
and psychiatric counseling.
Academic counseling is the stu-
and personal counseling. Academic
counseling is the student's usual
contact with the University sys-
tem. Each school has its own coun-
seling staff and its own system.
Lit School
The largest of these schools is
the literary college. In that school,
there is roughly one counselor for
every 170 students for freshmen
and sophomores and a somewhat
lower ratio for upperclassmen.
Counselors are paid about $700
per academic year and given re-
leased time arrangements in their
teaching loads to make up for the
six to eight hours weekly of coun-
seling and time spent in training.
There are 107 counselors in the
literary college.
The general counseling proced-
ure in the literary college is that
the student makes an appointment
with his counselor and presents
him with his counselor to decides
what courses he wants to take. His
counselor signs his appointment
card and the student proceeds to
his classes. These appointments
take from 15 minutes to a half
hour (waiting time excluded).
Throughout the rest of the year,
students make other appointments
to talk about dropping, adding or
changing courses and other future
revisions.
The other schools' procedures
are relatively similar to the liter-
ary college. If academic advising
takes the first few days the stu-
dent is on campus, then career
planning occupies all latter days.
Some schools have their own
placement services for their stu-
dents, but the main career coun-
seling office is the Bureau of Ap-
pointments and Occupational In-
formation.
The Bureau has three main di-
visions: the Educational Division,
for students and alumni inter-

ested in teaching; the General Di-
vision for those interested in busi-
ness, government or professional
employment and the Summer
Placement Service for those who
are looking for summer jobs.
The Bureau has extensive files
of employers and posts notices of
job opportunities and interviews
everyday in the "Daily Official
Bulletin" which is carried by the
Daily.
The University's Personnel Of-
fice also gives students job oppor-
tunities for summer or part-time
employment while still in school
and handles available positions for
regular employment at the Uni-
versity.
The third category of counseling,
personal counseling, is the widest
and often most important. It in-
volves the complicated process of
"referral" where a counselor, usu-
ally the academic counselor, rec-
ognizes that the help of an expert
in a particular field is needed and
either consults with that expert
or sends the student to the expert.
It also involves student initiated
services, such as Health Service,
where the student goes to the par-
ticular service on his own initia-
tive.
The counseling offered under
this category includesihandling
the emotional and physical prob-
lemsthat can interfere with a
student's career.
The Residence Hall System
offers Resident Advisers and Staff
counselors whose general aim is to
assist students in making the ad-
justment to University life and its
demands.
Psychological
There is also a Reading Im-
provement Service office to 'train
students in adding to their reading
speed and improving their study
habits.
The Bureau of Psychological
Services Student Counseling Di-
vision, has a staff of trained psy-
usually in the form of an hour
chologists who talk to students
about problems of vocational
choice, academic difficulty or so-
cial adjustment. Counseling is
interview with a staff member.
The Office of Financial Aids
helps to counsel students who are
in emergency financial shortage or
more serious complex financial
conditions.
Health Service operates fulltime
for the exclusive benefit of stu-
dents with a regular staff of doc-
tors, nurses, technicians, and
clerical workers. The Health Ser-
vice building includes a 60-bed in-
firmary and the facilities of Uni-
versity Hospitals.
The Office of Religious Affairs
is intended to be helpful to the
student concerned with religious
and philosophical questions and
conditions. Some thirty chaplains
serve as counselors.

All Namie Brand
YARINS

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There is a bureaucracy of guidance available at the University.

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