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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 30, 1966 - Image 46

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-08-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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University

Museums

Go

Thru

All

Stages

*0

There are many things on cam- shown on the fourth floor dis- oped, will be put on display in Ann
pus that should be on display: plays. There are also displays on Arbor.
about one fourth of them are, at anthropology, geology and astron- During the past two years, an
one of the four University mu- omy along with a planetarium. expedition from the University
sums on campus. Over 100,0 New minerology displays have has been working in Egypt at
visitors each year have stood in also been set up and much work is Karanis. These expeditions supply
awe over the rare knuckle bones the Kelsey Museum with its ex-
of giraffes who wandered over e don wth temysem ew- tensive displays. Jewelry, artwork,
est addition to the museum show-
the Sarobi desert in 228 A.D. or cases has been a meat eating foodstuffs, coins, glass, pottery
at ancient scrolls from the first dinasaur, Ailosaurus, who stands and writing materials can be
pornographic novels written in over 15 feet high. found throughout the two floors
the Far East. Relics and Bones of the museum.
For those who have never hung Artwork
their heads in the threatening The University Museum is not The University also has many
jaws of a mastodon or a water the only museum which is a pub- displays of art which depict all
shrew, the University Museum is lic display. The Kelsey Museum of periods and styles in art. At the
the place to go. Occupying two Archaeology contains an exten- University Art Museum, 100
floors and a balcony, the museum sive collection from the Medi-
contains a variety of displays. terranean world and from the
The "Hall of Evolulan" on the Near East. Most of the relics on
second floor, presents the plants display are from expeditions runx
and animais of the past geological by the University in the first ,
eras. One of the startling eye- quarter of this century. Between
catchers is the hardheaded "Duck- 1925 and 1936 two major expedi-
billed" dinosaur who bears a skull tions worked at Karanis in Egypt m
weighing 250 pounds. and Seleucia in Iraq.{

American Drawings have been the
feature display; along with Jap-
anese art and American Archi-
tecture.
The art museum also holds ex-
change programs with Cranbrook
Academy of Art which is well
equipped with renown modern
painting and sculpture.
Its permanent collection con-3
tains examples from Byzantine
bronzework to the rich and de-
tailed works of the Flemish mas-
ters. Modern pieces such as Pi-
casso's "Horse" and sculptures by
Jean Arp are also a part of the
collection.

Proud Mastodon

The exhibit also shows artifacts,

A mastodon, tne best preserved photographs and models of these
and most complete ever found in expeditions.
Michigan, somberly waits on its Since the end of the war, an
haunches for visitors to gape and expedition from the museum has
gasp at it as it sits proudly in been working at St. Catherine's
its second-floor domain. Mounted Monastery at Mt. Sinai in Egypt.
nobly to his right is a pterodactyl, The monastery, built around 550
an extinct flying reptile with a A.D. by Emperor Justinian, is of
wing span of almost 14 feet. particular importance because it
On the balcony there is a syn- houses the only known icons that
optic series of Michigan plants survived the eighth and ninth
and animals. Environmental in- century iconoclast heresy. The ex-
Fluences affecting the life and pedition is involved in photo-
growth of plants and animals are graphic work which, when devel-

University Museums have placed on display relics from all ages and stages of mankind. The ex-
hibits are taken from all over the world and have been dug up by various excavation teams from
the University; these expeditions supply the Kelsey Museum with its extensive displays of jewelry,
artwork, foodstuffs, coins, glass pottery and writing materials.

The University's collections be-
gan with a former acting presi-
dent Harry S. Frieze, who served
as curator of the collections until
his death in 1889. On a European
trip he purchased a collection of
engravings and photographs to
illustrate his lectures on the Arts
of Classical Antiquities.
Acquisition
The first important original
work was donated to the Univer-
sity by alumni in 1862. It was a
sculpture entitled "Nydia," by the
American sculptor Randolph Rog-
ers, who spent his youth in Amer-
ica and who later became one of
the leading figures in the Classi-
cal Revival,
In 1946, the Museum of Art
became an administrative unit and
the University embarked on the
acquisition program. The Mar-
garet Watson Parker bequest pro-
vided for over 600 items to be
given to the University. This is
the most important single col-
lection of works of art acquired by
the University to date.
Recently the museum's acquisi-
tion program was extended to
include early Western art since
the Sixth Century A.D., Near and
Far Eastern art, including India,
but with emphasis on Japan and
China.
The Stearns Collection of Musi-
cal Instruments shows the evolu-
tion of instruments throughout
the world and their development
into an art form. The collection,
housed on the second floor of Hill
Auditorium, shows the Instru-
ments of Renaissance Europe and
the Far East when they had more
than just a functional use.
Some of the instruments are
used in faculty and student con-
certsl others stand as being the
only ones of their kind in exist-
ence while an unfortunate minor-
ity, as a result of theft, are no
longer standing (in May, the only
Burmese Harp in North America
was stolen from its case in the
Stearns Collection).
Freaks
Also on display are "freak" in-
struments from other countries.
One such misfit is a 19th century
cane clarinet. The idea was that
a man taking a walk might get
an urge to play a tune. If he had
his cane clarinet, he could stop
and play for awhile.
Many of the instruments also
contain intricate and symbolic
ornamentation: w o o d c a r v i n g,
painting, sculpturing and design.
Among such instruments fs a
French Musical serpent, an an-
cestor of the tuba, used first in
churches. An ophiceide from Spain
is serpent headed and was used
for its terrifying aspect.
Another University museum is in
the lobby of the Undergraduate
Library. Lithographs, photographs,
engravings and drawings are con-
tinually displayed.

------
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$ cC We/come to An po

Stone-faced countenances preside over their fellow statues with
the same look of nobility as they did more than 2000 years ago
in S.E. Asia and its neighbors.
No fuzzy animals
No beer mugs
No sweatshirts
Just Good Books
a good spot for browsing
lots of chairs, a fireplace
and sales people who know books.
Bob Marshall's Book Shop
211 South State
Across from Lane Hall
Open 9 a.m. til 104p.m. Mon. thru Sat.
Open 2 p.m. til 10 p.m. on Sunday

I ' _

*

tinually displayed.
I i~. _______________:;1i

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//
Imo"

I

through this door lies the
jewelry designed for you

C

HIARMS

I"

an outstanding collection of
14 karat gold
and sterling charms

THE CROWN HOUSE OF GIFTS CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO AN EXCITING ADVENTURE
IN GIFT, HOME ACCESSORIES, CANDY AND GREETING CARD SHOPPING.
BACK-TO-SCHOOL

We're actually U shops in one!
CARD SHOP
(Ann Arbor's Largest)
Over 500 designs in Contemporary Cards
Over 100 designs in Everyday Cards
Party and Candle Shop
Season Cards for all occasions
* BARTON AND SANDERS CANDY
* MEN'S GIFT BAR
f CONTEMPORARY ACCESSORIES SHOP
* THINGS EARLY AMERICAN
* GIFTS FOR ALL OCCASIONS
ON THE LOWER LEVEL
BATH AND BOUDOIR SHOP
* PICTURE GALLERY

1. Bedspreads . . . bunk and twin sizesI
Specially priced for school opening.
2. U. of M. Monogrammed stationery .
assorted colors. 1.59

by Bates & Cannon
From $4.95
. . four styles

3. Huge assortment of desk accessories at only 99c each.
SPEC( AL SERViCES
Free Gift Wrapping
MalIng servce anywhere n U.S.A.
Monogramming of stationery, napkins, matches, etc.
One-day service.
Delivery Service
P 1 COME IN AND

IPiiIE RIC IEID IEAR I! N G S
a wide selection of gold and sterling earrings
Sare featuring
MONOGRAMMED
All engraving done at no extra charge.
Same-day service on request.

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