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November 01, 1966 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-01

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PAFE TWO

.THE M.ICHIGAN DtAILY

TUESDAY,, NOV' DER 1. 1996

t.ewl.a F E W'T.E M I H G A A IsT U S PillE 'R R I O

-- - ---- I - - .-.9lilyl .70

NOVEMBER ELECTIONS.
GOP House Gains May Wipe Out Liberal Majority

WASHINGTON. - President'
Johnson's over-riding election day
concern seems likely to be the
contests for the 435 seats in the
House of Representatives.
As the national leader of the
Democratic party, Johnson doubt-
less will follow closely the returns
from:35 gubernatorial and 35 sen-
atorial 'contests. But the .House
races hold the principal key as to
whether Johnson retains a work-
ing majority in Congress the nekt
two years.
Associated Press surveys indi-
cate Democrats may hold enough
Senate seats to keep their present
67-33 majority, but that as many
as 60 House races remain tossups
nine days before the election.
Democrats Hold Majority
Democrats now hold a House
majority of 294 to 139 with two
vaancies. "In the past 30 years,
the party out of power has gained
an average of 40 seats in non-
presidential elections.
Such a gain by the Republicans
this year would wipe out the ad-
ministration's working majority
in the House for many key do-
inestic programs, even though
Democrats would retain numerical
control.
This is because many Southern
Democats habitually join Repub-
licans in opposing Johnson's dom-
estic legislation, especially in the,
field of social welfare.
Domestic Legislation.
Much Kenneday administration
domestic legislation was stalled in

1961 and 1962 when Democrats
held 263 House seats, and John-
son programs such as rent sup-
plement, and demonstration cities
won key House tests this year by
six and 27 votes respectively.
Complicating the picture are
indications that Republicans may
retain governorships in New York,
Michigan and Ohio and pick one
up in California. A heavy Repub-
lican vote in those states could
tip the scales in doubtful House
contests.
In Michigan, Gov. George Rom-
ney is expected to defeat Dem-
ocrat Zolton Ferency for re-elec-
tion by a large.riihrgin and.emerge
as a leading GOP presidential
possibility.
Romney's Coattails
Political analysts will watch
closely to see if Aomney's coat-
tails are long enough to carry
Sen. Robert P. Griffin, in a tight
senatorial contest with former
Gov. G.. Mennen Williams, and
Republicans trying to oust three
Democratic freshmenHouse mem-
bers elected two years ago in nor-
mally Republican districts.
In New York, a complicated
four.-way race for governor my
influence contests for seven House
seats captured by Democrats in
1964.
In Ohio, Republican Gov. James
A. Rhodes is expected to'defeat
Frazier Reams Jr., and--his margin
may affect GOP efforts to win
back three House seats,, including
the. one involved in the nationally

publicized contest in Cincinnati
between Republican Robert Taft
Jr. and Rep. John J. Gilligan.
Most Publicized Race
Perhaps the most publicized
single race in the country this
year is the California gubernato-
rial contest between incumbent
Edmund G. Pat. Brown and Re-
publican Ronald Reagan. Brown
is hoping for a last-week boost
from President Johnson, who is
reportedly planning .a Western
campaign swing after he returns
from Asia.
Another .major gubernatorial
race, in Pennsylvania, is rated
close between. Republican Lt. Gov.
Raymond P. Shafer and Democrat
Milton J. Shapp. Conservative
nominee Edward S. Swartz may
draw votes from Shafer.
Democratic Gov. Harold Hughes
of Iowa is favored to win a third
term, and he may help the five
Democratic freshmen who cap-
tured House seats in 1964.
In Alabama, the expected elec-
tion of Mrs. George C. Wallace
as governor over Republican Rep.'
James D. Martin may help Dem-
ocrats oust some of the five Re-
publican House members elected
in 1964.
Spirited Laces
Alabama is just one of several
Southern states in which Repub-

licans are putting up spirited bids
for governorships.
In Georgia, a large undecided
vote appears to hold the key to
the race between conservative Re-
publican Howard H. Callaway and
segregationist Democrat Lester G.
Maddox.
In Arkansas, Republican mod-
erate Winthrop Rockefeller, broth-
er of the New York governor, is
running against segregationist
Democrat Jim Johnson.
In Florida, Republican Claude
Kirk Jr. is making a hard fight
against' Democrat Robert King
High, mayor of Miami. In Mary-
land a three-way race involves
moderate Republican Spiro T.
Agnew, independent Democrat
Hyman Pressman and veteran
Democrat George P. Mahoney,
campaigning on an anti-open
housing platform.
Democrat Defections
Republicans are trying to hold
a bridgehead in President John-I

son's home state of Texas where
Democratic defections are expect-
ed to help conservative Sen. John
G. Tower against conservative
Democrat Waggoner Carr,
One of the most publicized Sen-
ate races is in Massachusetts,
where Republican Edward W.
Brooke is trying to become the
first Negro elected to the Senate
since Reconstruction days. His op-
ponent is a liberal Democrat, En-
dicott Peabody. GOP Sen. Leverett
Saltonstall is retiring.
In Illinois, veteran Democratic
Sen. Paul H. Douglas, 74, is in the
toughest fight of his career against
Republican Charles H. Percy, 47,.
a onetime student of his at the'
University of Chicago.
In New Jersey, the expected re-
election of GOP Sen. Clifford P.
Case over Democrat Warren W.
Wilentz may help the Repub-
licans regain four Democratic
House seats.

CINEMA
I
presents
TOM JONES
in color
With Albert Finney
Susannah York
1 and 9:15 P.M.
Friday, Saturday,
and Sunday r
Aud. A, Angell Hall
Advance tickets
available 663-5832
(IlD. required)

YAF Book Sale

0

10 31-1 1

1 1 FISHBOWL OR DIAG

Up From liberalism (Buckley) 25c
The American Cause (Kirk) 10c
DONATION TO BE MADE TO THE
AMERICAN LEGION CHRISTMAS BASKET
FOR OUR BOYS IN VIETNAM
BRING CHRISTMAS TO
AMERICAN G.I.'s
IN .VIETNAM

4

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, Nov. 1, 1966, 12:00 Noon
U.M. Internotionail Center
SUB. ECT:
"THE CHANGING ROLE 'F WOMEN
I N MODERN JAPAN"
Speaker: Keiko Beppu
a graduate student in English Literature
For reservotions, Sponsored by the
call 662-5529 Ecumenical Campus Center
__________________________--_____-____-____--___

I'

"THE FLIES" SOLD OUT

SEATS NOW FOR PTP's "WEDDING BAND"

'Marat Sade' To Replace
Cancelled 'After the Fall',

By ANN L. MARCHIO
"Marat/Sade" has been booked
to replace "After the Fall," whose
N4ew York management cancelled
its tour .after failing to sign the
requisite stars. Subscribers to the
PTP Play of the Month Series can
use their March 6-7 tickets for the
proper performance of "Marat/-
Sade" without exchange.
Peter Weiss's "Persecution. and
Assassination of Marat as Per-
formed by .the Inmates. of the
Asylum of Chartenton under the
direction of the Marquis de Sade"
("Marat/Sade" for short) is the
winner of both the 'New York
Drama Critics Circle Prize and the
Tony Award as "Best Play of the
1966 Season."
Weiss is ranked as Germany's
leading contemporary playwright.;
First brought to New York by

England's R o y a 1 Shakespeare
Company, the play was described
in London'as a "part clown show,
part dance of death, bizarre and
blistering, but always magnifi-
cent." Life magazihe depicted
Weiss as daring and shocking but
a deeply committed artist of bold
and powerful originality.
Robert C. 'Schnitzer; executive
director of the PTP, in his 'an-
nouncement of the change,.stated,
"A remarkable work of force and
fascination, -Marat/Sade' will
make the 1966-67. Sesquicenten-
nial Play of the Month Series the
strongest ever presented."
Subscriptions at: discount are
available for the roster of six
Broadway hits at the PTP office
in Mendelssohn Theatre. The
series will be launched on Nov.
14-1.5 with "Royal Hunt of the
Sun,"

FvNjj FLcKf
Tt E FREsElMA
COMES ROARINGO TOF TH-E TWENrIES
AV'D LTO
FUNY SIDE OF LIFE
MICHIGAN 0 FRIDAY

10

4q-t CAPUS

DIAL
8-6416

ENDS
WEDNESDAY

WOODYALLE' THE WIL.DESTCOMEDYSOF'THE.YEAR.
STRIKES
BACK
SEEwwdHEAR , f"
THE LMVNSPOONFUL'S
NEWHit"POW"
EXTRA
"CASALES CONDUCTS
.LIMITED ENGAGEMENT STARTING THURSDAY
"THE AGONY AND THE ECSTASY"

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------
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. . . . .

. MIHIGS

Dial 5-6290
Held Over for'
Another Amnazing Week

Phone 482-2056
E aw "t CRPENTER R W W
FREE HEATERS
OPEN-6:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
MARION BRANDO
ANJANETTE COMER
JOHN SAXON 91onla

I' '1 'l'I I

AVAN'T GARDE
EXPERIMENTAL FILMS
WINNERS AND HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE
FOURTH ANN ARBOR FILM FESTIVAL
JENNIE AND THE POET
with Jennie Fitzpatrick, Frithjof Bergmann, Milton
Cohen, Harold Borkin, Robert Ashley, Mary Ashley,
Ann Borkin, Lee Daly, Betty Manupelli, Billie Ash,
Carolyn Cohen, Taja Bergmann, Mike Sherker, Gor-
don Mumma, Jackie Mumma, Larry Leitch, Aune
Britai Ronkanen. By George Manupelli.
MATCHGIRL
with Andy Warhol
and Gerard Malanga
by Andrew Meyer
ADAM'S FILM
by Lawrence Janiak
DUO CONCERTANTES
by Larry Jordan
UP-TIGHT, L.A. IS BURNING ...
by Ben Van Meter
RELAX YOUR MIND
with Roberta Bloom, Kenneth Bennett,
Lorna Klinger, and Nick Bertoni.
By Tom Berman and Chris Frayne
WED., NOV. 2
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50c, at 7 and 9 P.M.

I SUBSCRIPTIONS STILL AVAILABLE!

p
4

"tGEORGE PEPPAI3D i t1ES1M ASON- IiRS A ADRMSS
Shows at 1:00-3:40-6:15-9:05
FRIDAY: HAROLD LLOYD'S "THE FUNNY SIDE OF LIFE" +

THE APPALOOSA
TECHNICOLOP J
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pp .
TECHNICOLOR.
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COLOR CARTOON

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wommi
NOMI

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" TOMORROW!."
WMTDISNE presents
THFGHTIGP
OF ,
DONEGAL
High-spirited

JLY .
him
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YES!

fourteen times

Yes!

LEN CHANDLER

Columbia records recording

artist,

folk singer and composer
will be at
CllTFdRBURY iFTUSK
this weekend

...........Y:":
I
:"f

not ten, not thirty-one, but 3

(count 'em)

whole

wild, beautiful, mind-blowing

I

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I - Sijri 1iNd'e nmed4,iHit .X-ww -u~

I

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