100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 28, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAFE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28,1966'

THE MICHIGAN DAILV FRIDAY. OCTOBER ~R. I9GG

s. ara ii vva.vai aiaV Hv 1vVV

DANCE
Robert Joffrey Ballet Shines;
Individual Dancers Outstanding

THEATRE
Greek 'Oresteia' Basis
Of Sartre's 'T he Flies'

By JOYCE WINSLOW
Those wl o saw the Robert Jof-
frey Ballet perform here Wednes-
day evening are probably still un-
der the spell of "Sea Shadow." Its
setting was elemental: three sea-
washed rocks and three straight
poles asymmetrically arranged.
Hazy, eerie music ebbed and
flowed. A man on the ocean floor
ebbed and flowed with the current
of the water like supple seaweed.
A wisp of a girl with fluid move-
ments danced with him and com-
pletely captivated the audience.
Together, their 'movements were

perfectly aligned, and breathtak- Dancers alas-alacked all over the
ingly beautiful. stage in a maudlin gavotte. This
Aesthetically, the dance was per- variation also saw the glorification
fect. Richard Gain and Trinette of the jete. Luis Fuente jeted, the
Singleton are superb dancers who ladies jeted, and the ladies and
dance with emotion as well as Luis jeted. Mock somber faces

with excellent control. Technically
the dance is very interesting. The
barefoot strength and body con-
tortion of modern dance is blend-
ed with the lambswooled soft-
ness and controlled grace of ballet.
Gerald Arpino is to be admired
and hailed for his choerography.
Choreography
"Donzetti Variations," choreo-
graphed by George Balanchine,
was a comic melodramatic satire.

Javits Sp eaks for Griffin,
Av os Presiential Re
DETROIT WP)-New York's lib- and himself as a liberal. He said
eral Republican Sen. Jacob Javits he disagreed with Griffin on tax
came to Michigan Wednesday to and spending matters but said
praise Sen. Robert Griffin, not to they agree on most other things.
bury him in speculation about the "We don't always agree on every
1968 GOP presidential nomina- issue," Javits declared at a lunch,
tion. "but he has the courage of his
Butnewsmen managed to evoke convictions when he stands for
from Javits the comment that if something."
Gov. George Romney wins his bid , Javits said he and Griffin found
for a third term he must be given themselves in agreement on well
"prime consideration" as a poten- over 50 per cent of the issues that
tial White House candidate and have come up since the Michigan
the party's national spokesman. senator was appointed by Romney
Javits, who has been mentioned last May to fill the vacancy cre-
as a possibility for the No. 2 spot ated by the death of Democratic
on a Republican ticket headed by Sen. Patrick McNamara.
Romney, was reluctant to discuss The real weakness of the Rep-
the 1968 picture. lican party, Javits said, is that
The 1966 elections, he said, must 'only a few people have ideas of
be decided before thinking about what to do."
1968. "My part is woefully short of
Javits' visit was set up in re- those who offer constructive al-
sponse to a request from Griffin, ternatives," he added.
who is engaged in a neck-and- Griffin is one man who can
neck senatorial race with former help fill the gap, Javits asserted.
Gov. G. Mennen Williams. The Griffin camp was delighted
It was intended to bolster sup- with the Javits appearance, even
port for Griffin among Detroit's though the New York senator was
Jewish community and among lib- only in Detroit for a few hours.
eral voters. New York's other One prominent Washington col-
senator, Democrat Robert Ken- umnist -who has, followed Javits'
nedy, is to stump Michigan on career closely said the New Yorker
Williams' behalf Saturday. seldom voices such strong support
Javits heaped praise on Griffin for other GOP office-seekers and
as the kind of young, aggressive, usually turns down invitations to
intelligent people he would like to visit other states.
see elected to the Senate. . Javits is chairman of the cam-
Campaigning for Griffin, Javits paign of New York Gov. Nelson
termed his Senate colleague a Rockefeller, who is seeking re-
m i d d I e-of-the-road Republican election.

were lifted atop the saucy spritely
step, in this parody of old royal
propriety.
"Pas des Deeses" was imagina-
tive in its choreography (Robert
Joffrey) but disappointing in its
execution. The dance was inspired
by a Romantic lithograph of 1864
by the artist Bouvier. At the be-
ginning of the dance the dancers
are seen in the pose of this famous
lithograph. Three ladies in ro-
mantic tulle are grouped around
a regal gentleman in splendid red
velvet. 'Each variation," reads the
Program, shows off the qualities
made famous by the quartet of
great 19th century dancers. The
air of competition among the
three ballerinas echoes the deli-
cate rivalry which actually existed
among these celebrated dancers."
The delicate rivalry was not as
apparent as was the lack of com-
parable skills of Joffrey's dancers.
Because Ivy Clear and Chartel
Arthur danced so much better
than Noel Mason and Nels Jorgen-
sen the balance of the dance was
completely upset and the attempt
to portray delicacy of emotion was
lost.
Lacks Unity
The Ballet Troupe as a whole
seems to lack unity. Individual
performers shine and are easily
recognizable even when dancing
among many other members in
the company. Other members are
consistently good in technique, but
dance without the "feel" that
turns well-done exercise into an
enjoyable audience experience.
What is missing is an overall
polish and perfection which would
lead one to applaud the troupe as
a whole rather than certain of its
members.
But perhaps it is unfair to
compare all the company to Jon
Cristofori or Richard Gain or
TrinetterSingleton. One can still
see her in his mind gliding and
rippling where there was no water.
Phone 482-2056
En.ane o. CARPENTER RaAD
FREE HEATERS
OPEN-6:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
MARLON BRANDO
ANJANETTE COMER
O NSA N Shown
JOHN RAUII11 P.M.
THE APPALOOSA
TECHNICOLOR*
Shown at 9:10 Only
TECHNICOLOR.
PLUS- .
"CRUISING WATERS'
COLOR CARTOON

By ANN L. MARCHIO
A collage of theatre experience
is presented in Jean-Paul Sartre's
"The Flies." Having its roots in
the Greek trilogy of the "Ores-
teia," the play maintains a con-
temporary theme.
Lawrence Luckenbill portrays a
youthful Orestes, who is almost
contemptible in comparison with
the strong figure of the classical
version. Unlike his ancestor, this
Oreses does not act under the
strings of Fate, nor does he feel
the curse of his dual murder. His
triumph over the will of Zeus as-
serts his freedom from the juris-
diction of the gods.
The idea of freedom to decide is
basic to the philosophy of Sartre.
As an existentialist he believed
that man is "alone, abandoned on
earth in the midst of his infinite
responsibilities, without help, with
no other aim than the one he sets
for himself, with no other destiny
than the one he forges for himself
on this earth.'
Refuses Nobel Prize
This belief of Sartre's is ap-
parent in his refusal to accept the
Nobel Prize in order to declare his
independence from the require-
ments of the acceptance. The
theme also has much greater sig-

nificance as an incitement against
Nazi occupation. The play was
presented for the first time in 1943
at the Theatre de la Cite in Paris.
Olivia Cole also presents a more
plausible portrait of the original
Electra. The dynamic Miss Cole
created a young girl caught be-
tween the fantasy of adolescence
and the necessity to accept the re-
sponsibility of her actions.
Zeus, played by David J. Stew-
art, also deserves special mention.
He speaks with the voice of a god
who has an inferiority complex
and is especially lovable in his last
soliloquy.
Music and Choreography
Besides the dichotomy of char-
acter and theme are the aspects of
music and choreography. The wid-
er range of simulation provided
by computer composition, realized
by George Balch Wilson and Jack
Fortner at the School of Music,
is successfully balanced by primi-
tive and complex rhythms of the
drums. In a similar juxtaposition
the dances emerge a hallmark of
primative-modern conception.
"The Flies" is a difficult pro-
duction but is amazingly co-ordin-
ated on the limited stage of Men-
delssohn Theatre. It reigns as a
final triumph of the APA season.

C4presents SOPH SHOW '66
"How To Succeed in Business j
Without Really Trying"
Nov. 10, 1 1 & 12, 8:00, Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Tickets: Nov. 10, $1.75 & $2.00
Nov. 1 1 & 12, $2.00 & $2.25
THE DEADLINE for block ticket applications HAS BEEN CHANGED to
Monday, October 31, at 12:00 noon, at the Soph Show Office at the
Michigan League.
BLOCK TICKET DRAWING
TUESDAY, November 1, 4:00, SOPH SHOW OFFICE
A representative from each group desiring block tickets
must be present at the drawing.
I - - - - -- == = = == = =

C

4

W.vHAT s 5o rloAIA)Y
I4Bc9CJTCC/-LEGS
(-t Ft #LW4A4!

IL

Friday, Oct. 28

WILLIAM HAMILTC
Prof. of Theology, Colgate Rochester Divi
Author: Radical Theology and the Dea
(with T. Altizer; The New Essence of C
THE MEANING OF RADICAL
ALSO: Responding to the lectures will be Dr. Thomas J. J. Altizer
Emory University, Atlanta
Dr. Langdon Gilkey: Prof. of Theology, the Divinity School
Dr. Kenneth Hamilton: Prof. of Systematic Theology at Unite
Dr. Thomas Oglestree: Prof. of Constructive Theology, Chico
Friday, October 28-8:00 P.M.-Rockham
Sponsored by:
The Office of Religious Affairs (2282 SAB) and The Ecumer
in cooperation with The National Campus Ministry Association an

8:00 P.M.

Rack

ham Auditorium
nity School
th of God
hristionity
THEOLOGY
Prof. of Religion,
of the University of Chicago
d College, Winnepeg
go Theology Seminary
Auditorium
nical Campus Ministry
d Bobbs-Merrill, Publishers

1

- _

..*r... . . .. ....

NOW
Dial 8-6416

L i11LJ. '1

TODAY AT
7 and 9 P.M.

WOODY ALLEN Slk*$qS BACK

CINEMA II

presents

1:,

with PAUL NEWMAN
Fri. & Sat. Only
7:00 & 9:15 P.M.
Aud. A, Angell Hal

READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIED ADS

Do You, Eli Ko
take this won
"EXTREMEI
IN
"COBUF

itch, slickest, swingin'est con-man in the world,
Take them he does...for all they're worth

r

I

50c

ired

I D. Req u

NOW!

DIAL
5-6290

I

* t
1 t
I t
1 t
Demeival
1 1
1 t
j~~p(dir. Haloweenrkeeke9d)
r 1
9 1
1 1
t t
1 1
t I
American. Music by Antheil, played by Shorty
I Rogers. Banned by N.Y.C. Censor Board as
1 "nhun. mn irient nd'r 4thim nri tctsereocif'

HELD OVER FOR 2ND HIT WEEK
Shows at 1:00-3:35-6:15-9:00
DIRECT FROM ITS ROADSHOW ENGAGEMENT!
SPECIAL POPULAR PRICES,- SPECIAL SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES
6 '
r }
"Thoroughly
exciting...
Superb...
Real Award
Winning Quality!"
(Awa,' l kuogr ly etS -p

.LY CLEVER. . SOMETHING IN IT FOR EVERYBODY,
CLUDING PROFESSIONAL SAFECRACKERS"
---New Yorker Mog.
RN IS CATNIP TO EVERY PUSSYCAT IN SIGHT!"
-New York Times

'V

I

COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents
Jl ES COBUR N

0ERP HERTcoo

Shows at
1:00-3:00
5:05-7:15
4,7

.... ... :x\ t.

I

I

lIpw

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan