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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 30, 1966 - Image 40

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-08-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

HE MICHIGAN DA1LI

T'tTRqnAV- AirmimgrV qtl Inan

PAGE FOUR IIIE IYlICIIIIiAN DAILI TT~',~flA~r AT1F!rtc5~u nfl

1l UfIY, flUl ullill, 3U, 1966

I,

Gargoyle, Humor Magazine,
Shows Signs of Improvement

CULINARY CRITIQUE:

THE "GARGOYLE" meets and creates the stranges people; not
to mention the folks it attracts.

By SHIRLEY ROSICK
The Gargoyle, campus humorl
mag, will soon be publishing, but
summer students were forced to
exist for four months without it.
Lucky kids! But wait a minute,
that doesn't sound at all civil, and
I had hoped to diverge from the
entrenched Daily modus operandi
of passing all. Must be a few bones
that can be thrown to the Garg
staff.
The magazine does sell well, at
the few and irregular intervals
when its editors manage to slap
something together, and lately it
has been including more and more
locally-inspired material instead of
relying on funnies lifted from
other college's publications or re-
hashes of past Garg articles.
Enough pats on the back. The
Garg can fight back for itself-
try to at least-and does partici-
pate in a traditional reciprocal
mud-slinging contest, retaliating
against Daily criticism with hard-
ly poisonous barbs.

attention in recent issues of Gar-
goyle. Reprints of old Daily ar-
ticles have been accompanied by
unfunny and irrelevant remarks.
The Garg has also used a Daily
reject written by that unpromising
critic and satirist but promising
sot J. W. Schutze, recently re-
stored his 2-S deferment after
being pandered as Draft Director
Hershey's mistress.
But even these plays and the
constant, anemic references to our
rag as a garbage wrapper are
hopeful indications that Gargoyle
will direct its humor at campus
issues. The staff has been more
successfully when working with
nationally relevant material-in-
cluding entire issues devoted to
parodies of Time (Tyme) and the
New Yorker (New Forker). But.
then, they have had plenty of
models or instances of direct
steals.
Gargoyle is always pressed to
come up with original comments
on local happenings, straining the
already overworked subjects of
overcrowding and "anonymity at

the impersonal 'U." On occasion,
though, it has almost soared, as
with a successful spoof of Genera-
tion, the campus inter-arts mag-
azine. Something in that issue
called the "Piece Worker," takes
of the Hopwood Award-winning
script "Peacemaker." It plays on
writer Carl Oglesby's intense mo-
railty and involvement, which
maks him a capable spokesman
for the activities but hurts his art.
Garg exposes his failure to
maintain an emotionaladetach-
ment from his work and to mas-
ter a Hesse-type capacity for
laughing at contradictions.
Objects for future Garg ridicule,
good-natured of course, might in-
clude the pompous would-be cam-
pus literati ("Stay out of my
'self'" Abbot White), the ultra-
dedications of the activists, the
cloying pleas of crusaders for a
"student role in the decision mak-
ing process," the making of the
University President...
Bring your ideas to 420 May-
nard St., first floor corner office
soon; help spur a Gargoyle re-
vivifaction.

A Reviewer in a Stew
By BETSY COHN peers perceptively at the perform- nition. To notice that the heroine
Do you like to cook your own ance making intelligent mental has a hidden tattoo and to make
goose or would you rather jump in notations about the actor's mer- note of it in an article, is to clue
with it and really be in a stew? its, quirks, presence; the produc- over 9000 readers to be aware of
If so, the job of a critical reviewer er's faults, gimmicks; etc. that tattoo too!
is for you. At 11 p.m., he gallops fearless- The obligations which come
Reviewing is not a job for chick- ly to The Daily and quickly writes from being a reviewer is that of
ens, rather it is a task for one (in an intelligible and grammat- being able to defend and with-
with a critical, discerning and ically accurate fashion) an honest stand brutal attack from o.p.o.
alert set of eyes. Possessing these and fair critique. (outside popular opinion). All
optical traits, one must also be The pleasures derived from such subjective remarks made in re-
in possession of a quick mind an effort are many: the writer views must be firmly backed by
ready to peck out pertinent opin- receives the prestigious byline. He fact and example.
ions in time to meet a midnight receives the powerful feeling of Movies, music, art, poetry: they
deadline. Thus, the schedule is as one who leads the booing in a all have something to offer: we
follows: reviewer attends a pro- huge auditorium; that is the feel- must return their offer and oblige
duction (concert, movie, play, ing of power one feels when his them with some critical and intel-
etc.) at 9 p.m. For two hours he opinion is given universal recog- ligent commentary.

Make WAHR'S your
headquarters
for all your textbook
and college supplies
SERVING U OF M STUDENTS SINCE 1883

'4I

10 1. -

r

A 3 as a matter of fact, The Daily
I has gotten more than its share of

WELCOME

"GENERATION" is inspiration from all sources. "Generation" is pencils, paper, labor . . . "Gen-
eration" is poetry, creativity.
Generation Aims at Inter-Action
Of Quality Arts on 'U' Campus

4

U.

of

Mg.

Students

By ANNE RICHMOND
and RAYNA RAPP

MICH IGAN'S Wolverines - Michigan's

I

famous Marching Band-The

Victors-

State Street-The League-The Union

GENERATION is an inter-arts
magazine. "Inter-arts" i m p ii e s
many things. It provides an arena
where people interested in all
phases of the arts can exchange
ideas and present their work.
The "inter" of "inter-arts"
means that potential poets can be
published side by side with an
original sonata, back to back with
modern dance notation, and all in
the same issue with a portfolio of
r-
For RESULTS
Read and Use
Daily Clossifieds

a dozen photographs of Pakistani
children.
The "arts" of "inter-arts" means
that it aims at quality, the repre-
sentation of the finest creative ef-
forts being produced on campus
right now. Anybody is welcome to
contribute work that shows prom-
ise, excitement, and enthusiasm;
freshmen as well as in Ph.D. can-
didates and alumni.
The composition of the staff re-
flects the varied interests and
scope of the magazine. The main-
stay of the senior staff includes
an editor for every phase of the
arts: drama and book reviewing,
photography and art work, music
and non-fiction, as well as poetry
and fiction.
For anyone interested in the
actual editing and production of
a small magazine, Generation pro-
vides unlimited opportunities for
learning techniques of layout,
composition, proofreading, adver-
tising, and circulation. Each editor
has his own staff, but the maga-
zine organization is small enough
to allow everyone .to participate in
as many aspects as interest them.
The possibilities of the arts are
limitless. Last year, Generation's
seventeenth, was a year of expan-
sion. The first and second issues
ran an 80-page analysis of the
Once Festival, Ann Arbor's yearly
avant-garde music concert series.
In the field of non-fiction we pub-

- all

are great

traditions of

a great

University.

lished a 60-page essay by the pres-
ident of Students for a Democratic
Society, on the war in Viet Nam.
We expanded and grew to meet
the challenge of our contributors
and, with the increasing resources
of the campus community, Gener-
ation has come to include more
and more.
The expansion went beyond the
covers of the magazine. Genera-
tion sponsored two poetry read-
ings, and a number of seminars
with faculty members who dis-
cussed particular literary topics.
In addition, the'e were open
workshops on editorial techniques
and magazine production.
The eighteenth year of publica-
tion will continue this process of
expansion to fulfill Generation's
role as a magazine both of the
arts and of the campus. The ar-
tistic community has many unique
offerings-the Once Festival which
we have already chronicled is one
of them; the Professional Theatre
Program, the experimental film
showings, the education theatre
experiments of the speech depart-
ment, and the Choreographers'
Workshop at Barbour gym are
others and worthy of coverage in
Generation.
An expanding audience is an-
other goal that this eighteenth
volume will set for itself. Genera-
tion should be an integral part of
the campus and, as such, should
reach as many people as possible.
For the first time subscriptions
will be available at registration,
which will entitle the subscriber
to all three issues for the 1966-67
year for $1.25, a saving over the
regular price of 50 cents each if
bought individually.
The first mass meeting will be
7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 7, at
the Generation office in the Stu-
dent, Publications Bldg., 420 May-
nard St. Anyone interested in the
arts in magazine production, in
being involved with the cultural
life of the campus is welcome.

I

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given the best in dry cleaning and shirt launder-
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many alumni around the country still send gar-
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In Ann Arbor, GREENE'S have four convenient
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STUDQNT BOOK SQRVICGL
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THE PICK-UP AND DELIVERY SERVICE on dry
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For same-day service, take your garments to any
of GREENE'S cleaning plants.

SMITH-CORONA & OLYMPIA
TYPEWRITERS
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ALL MAKES, bought, sold,
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TERMS: We try to suit customer,

DEALER for A. B. Dick Mimeographs
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