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October 21, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21 1966

PAGE TWO:,

T'S'E MICHIGAN DAILY

- - -

FILMS
Saturday Night, Sunday Morning' Has
Active Photography, Plot and Characters

"For as many of you as have]
been baptized unto Christ have

P

-, 4

I

.

ASHOK TALWAR
Singing the Folk Music of India

put on Christ."
GAL
CHURCH
530 Wes

i
i
I

AIONS 3:27
OF CHRIST
st Stadium

By BETSY COHN.
The untiring camera in "Satur-
day Night and Sunday Morning,".
scans the dusty English industrial
town, peers into well worn village
homes and looks askance at the
tired and dirty remnants of the
factory town.
Working with three "ologies":
socio-, psycho- and bio-, this ac-
tive camera plus plot and char-
acters work to blend, strengthen
and sometimes aggravate one an-,
other.
Arthur Seaton (Albert Finney)
is a worker who has become mech-
anized and somewhat embitteredj
by the five days a week factory
grind. His exasperation is monot-.
ony and his story .is the fight he
wages against it. With mashed
teeth, sweat and hard labor, he
merely functions during the week:I
on weekends he explodes -- beer,i

betting and women . .. they serve expressions from every angle, the movie does benefit from low
as his "off days" retreat and his turns its probing lens toward the key drama through which it is
ineffective palliative. London town, commenting silent- projected as the intense moments,
He has an affair with the wife ly on the hardened faces of the such as a nightmarish ride in an
of a co-worker; she gets preg- people and their poverty. Under amusement park, resembling a
nant, he gets beaten by a jeal- the direction of Karel Reisz, the journey through a vividly light-
ous husband's entourage. He next film moves at a steady and even ed, never-ending, concentric cir-
encounters Doreen (Shirley Ann pace; the ticky tack sounds of the cle; solidify into permanent and
Field), a woman equal in his streets blending in with the grind- impressive moments.
strength and vibrance, sharing his ing harsh noises of the steel fac- The characters, music and light-
disdain for the innocuous life of tory, harmonizing adeptly with the ing fade out quietly; we only
his TV-motivated parents, who soft sounds of the interspersed love know that Arthur realizes his need
are . . . "dead from the neck up." scenes. for change . . . and will continue
Albert Finney seems content Like "Morgan," also under the to fight boredom. Undoubtedly, the
and well-qualified to make the direction of Reisz, there is a subtle viewer does not have to wage the
movie center about his struggle to ingenuity in the use of camera to same battle; the very lively . and
get away from the life that his explore shadowed crevices and to sensitive acting of Finney with
environment is trying to pattern make strikingly suggestive glanc- the amusing and fulfilling carica-
for him. He looks for enjoyment es at vivid posters such as "Life ture types of minor parts, the geo-
in everyday things and fights to is glorious." metric viewpoint of the camera,
purify the static and polluted air Perhaps the psychological dra- and other minor effects, make
around him. ma loses some of its impact by Cinema II's offering this week,
The camera, after fully exploit- running simultaneously with a so- worthwhile viewing for any "olo-
ing Finney's anatomy and facial cial documentary. Nevertheless, gy."

I

TONIGHT mittij4TONIGHT

- I

Phone 482-2056
OPEN 5:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
-FREE H 1EATERS-

JOEL SAXE

*GENE BARKIN

Singing the Folk Music of USA
Special Guest
DSR. HAZEL LOSH
Talkin' 'bout them "BOlues"

Director Incorporates 'Self-Help' Policy
To Replace 'Fix-up, Clean-up' Program

(aontinued f-rom Page 1)
profit corpqrations is patterned
after a plan. now in effect in Dela-.
ware, Pa. In this area, several
ministers have . formed a group.
which purchases run-down hous-
ing units, renovates, them and
thenrents apartments at low cost.
The first 14 houses have already
been opened, offering units at $50
a month. CHIP hopes to set up a
similar project. However,. approval
from the - city- government is
needed.
The Wade House is financed'
primarily through the Unitedi
Fund, donations from- three- local
Philadelphia foundations, and the
Friends' church. CHIP does not,
however, receive fundsr from the
United Fund. Money for this pro-,
j ect is received from the founda-
tions and the neighborhood. j
Overtones of Black Power
According to Roose, at the be-.,
ginning of the mass activating of
CHIP, some of the local commun-
ity leaders were doubtful and felt
that perhaps a project connected
with Wade House should not be
involved in something which had
overtones of Black Power and
might turn into a race riot. Since
the results have been productive,
opposition for the most part has
subsided.
Roose, commenting on the re-
action, said, "The poor have been

denied everything and then the ing committee. "The poverty pro-}
white power structure is upset by gram, as it presently is set up can-1

two words-Black Power-said by
one guy, Stokely Carmichael. Peo-
ple are just about calling for his
neck. Five years ago they were
after Malcolm X, and five years
before that they were after Mar-
tin Luther King. Who will they be
after five years from now?
The local organizations of Wade
House have also been opposed to
the Greater Chester Movement, a
program of the Office of Economic
Opportunity. Until recently, this
group, like all poverty programs,
has not involved local residents of
the ghetto on the city wide steer-

not involve the poor and therefore
is neither desirable or significantly
productive. In the last two years,
the Chester movement has spent
$2;400,000.. There are questions
about where these funds are going
that the local residents wants an-
swered," Roose said.
Riots in 1964
The Greater Chester Movement
was set up as a result of the race
riots in 1963-64. The riots were
caused by inferior educational
facilities in a local elementary
school.
Roose also points out that CHIP

is not a civil rights movement but
rather a movement for the poor-
white and black. Organization of
poor whites is a part of the long
range goal. "If issues which are
common to both poor whites and
poor blacks are dealt with, I think
the two groups will work together.
I'd like to try this type of organ-
izing," Roose said.
In addition to CHIP, the settle-
ment also has local programs con-
cerned with education, recreation,
and outside contact. Eighty-four
students from Swarthmore College
have recently volunteered to work
for the settlement, primarily doing
research into existing social con-
ditions in the area'

Shown at 7:10 & 11:20
Co
SUSAN!!DENBER8 LEES CRANE -WARREN STEVENS &N~
PARKE a~e~ra4? NORMANaMAILER
ALSO
Rata Pie Wood
Henry Fonda
Laren Bacall
Mel Ferrer
Shown at 9:20 Only
Co-Starring
LESLIE PARRSH and EDWARD EVERETT HORTON
TECHNICOLOR' From-WARNER BROS.
PLUS-
"WHEN FISH FIGHT"
2COLOR CARTOONS
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

4

L

8:30

G103 South Quad

OPENS TUESDAY!

$1.00

HELD OVER !
2nd HIT WEEK!
"HIGH LOW COMEDY. It is a strange and effecting film that
should not be passed by."-PAUL SAWYER, Michigan Daily
"BRILLIANT"
-Brendan, Chit.,The Neaw hr'
MOR.,GAN!

1'

TODAY!

4e SATE

0

Program
Information
NO 2-6264

CARVING A LEGEND OF GREATNESS.
from the Blue Ridge to the Rio Grandea

".

TONITE THRU SUNDAY!

4LVAREZKELLY
MSTARRN
JICLRJLE*VIaORIA gM . PARIEk 'NAL RERLC CRMEL
WRITTEN 8Y MUSIC BY PRODUCED BY DIRECTED BY
HEA.g jOTHERS FOUR SING ALVAREZ KELYON COtUMBIA RECOROS'
Today at 1 :00-3:00-5:10-7:20-9.30

:UA

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
CHILDREN'S THEATRE
presents
JAMES THURBER'S
THE
13
CLOCKS

i~V
4

SATURDAY, Oct. 29, at 10 A.M. & 2'P.M.
SUNDAY, Oct. 30, at 2 P.M.
TRUEBLOOD AUDITORIUM
--- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

1~

To: University Players
Children's Theatre
Department of Speech
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, Michigan

MAKE
CHECKS
PAYABLE
TO
UNIVERSITY
PLAYERS

I enclose $_

___ for

_.- Children's tickets (50c)
Adult tickets ($1)
Performance Choice (circle) : Saturday 10
Saturday 2

. 'o I

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