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October 20, 1966 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-20

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGER THRE

THURSDAY. OCTOBE r~ . i..: i~rrri rR 20, 1966 ._ ._..HI_._ -PAILYPA(.._ TTKRVI

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Negroes Riot
At Oakland
ligh School
Close Building After
Second Straight Day
Of Racial Disturbance
OAKLAND, Calif. (P)-A gang
of 250 Negro youths ran wild at
1 a predominantly Negro high school
yesterday, beat up five white
teachers, jostled white students
eating lunch and forced the 2,700-
student school to shut down.
"We have closed Castlemont
High School because of fear of
physical violence," said Stuart S.
Phillips, Oakland superintendent
of schools.
In the same East Oakland area,
150 more Negro youths began rip-
ping apart a food market at 89th
and East 14th streets. Police
rushed to the scene and closed off
traffic.
Rampage Resumes
The disorders were a resump-
tion of a rampage Tuesday night
in East Oakland by roving Negro
teen-age gangs during which five
whites were beaten up, 19 persons
arrested and 47 business firms were
damaged.
Stuart blamed the disorders at
Castlemont on a committee which
called yesterday for a three-day
boycott of junior and senior high
schools, charging that education
at three predominantly Negro
schools was inferior.
Castlemont officials also said
the trouble was spurred in part by
Negroes trying to get back inside
for lunch after joining the boycott
in the morning.
The five assaulted teachers were
given first-aid treatment in the
principal's office. One, Daniel
Hickey, 30, had a bloody nose and
a cut eye.
Market Closed
A nearby supermarket had to be
closed after 75 juveniles raced
about, snatching merchandise and
knocking over shelves.
The disorders began Tuesday
night in East Oakland and spread
' downtown after a traffic accident
involving a Negro woman's car.
Police arrested a young Negro
woman passerby after they said
she flew into a rage. Her brother
intervened and was arrested. The
disorders grew and spread.
Spot Check
School officials said a prelimi-
nary spot check indicated absen-
teeism of about 20 per cent against
a normal 10 per cent.
A group calling itself the Ad
Hoc Committee has urged both
students and teachers to stay away
to attend four "freedom schools."
The group claimed about 700
students were in the first classes
yesterday held in churches and a
night club.
Dist. Atty. Frank Coakley issued
a warning that any teachers ab-
sent from regular classes to take
part in such schools might face
prosecution on charges of contrib-
uting to the delinquency of minors.
The office of the superintendent
of schools had no word on any
teacher absentees.

U.S. Helicopter Losses Heavy
In Mekong River Delta Battle
SAIGON VP)-Viet Cong gunners air force sent 38 jet fighter planes demilitarized zone. Pilots reported
took a heavy toll yesterday of into the area Tuesday to suppress destroying or damaging 25 barges,
U.S. helicopters supporting the the Viet Cong fire, and used four eight antiaircraft gun positions,
Vietnamese army in a big battle other planes to drop flares during nine storage areas and eight
in the Mekong River delta., down- the night. trucks.
ing four and damaging 20, a U.S. Ground action elsewhere in the In South Viet Nam, U.S. pilots
spokesman said. But casualties country was limited to small skir- flew 355 sorties against Viet Cong
among the helicopter crewmen mishes. U.S. ground troops report- camps, storage areas and supply
were described as very light. ed killing 37 enemy soldiers in depots.
The battle blazed up Tuesday scattered action. The B52 bomb raids just south
between 1,000 Vietnamese soldiers Bad weather cut U.S. bombing of the demilitarized zone were in-
and about 1,000 Communist troops raids over North Viet Nam Tues- tended to slow or check the infil-
26 miles southeast of Can Tho. day to 44 missions in the southern tration of North Vietnamese army
Severe fighting continued all day panhandle which lies north of the regulars into South Viet Nam.
yesterday. A Vietnamese spokes- ----- -- - --- ----
Iman said government casualties
were moderate, an indication the
In te air ar, Ui. B2bmesJosioC Sc oo Board
In the air war U.S. B52 bombers
from Guam struck at suspected
North Vietnamese camps just
south of the demilitarized zone
between the two Viet Nams. U.S.
officials in Saigon said they be-
lieved the North Vietnamese will BOSTON tP) - Chinese-Ameri- The School Committee has been
make a drive in this area soon. can public school children in Bos- embroiled with the state board

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-Associated Press
OAKLAND POLICE ARREST A NEGRO FOR REFUSING to disperse when ordered. The arrest came on the second day of racial
disturbance in the, California city. Windows have been broken, fires started and a school closed in the unrest.
CONGRESSIONAL ROUNDUP:
Senate Passes Truth-in-Packaging Bill-
Social Security Benefit aise Delayed

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Marshland
The battleground near Can Tho,
which is 90 miles southwest of
Saigon, is a marshland, long dom-
mnated by the Viet Cong. The Viet
Cong shot down two U.S. Super
Saber Jets there a week ago.
Some of the American helicop-
ters were hit Tuesday when they
started lifting South Vietnamese
troops into the area.
Sixteen unarmed helicopters
hauling troops were hit and two of
them were knocked down, One of
seven gunship helicopters provid-
ing cover was downed and the
other six damaged.
The fourth loss came yesterday
when Communist fire dropped a
medical evacuation helicopter.
Three Recovered
Three of the four crashed heli-
copters were recovered, an offi-
cial report said.
Unofficial sources in the field
said no Viet Cong bodies have been
found and added that the govern-
ment's assessment of its own cas-
ualties may be low.
The sources said that the Com-
munists set up machine guns in
the troop landing zone in a cross-
fire pattern, but did not open up
' until the helicopters had hauled
in a large number of troops.
The American and Vietnamese

ton have been officially declared
white by the School Committee in over the issue of racial Imbalance,
the latest phase of the controver- but only as it concerns Negroes.
sy over racial imbalance in schools.: The state board has withheld
Classification as white of the 671 some $16 million in state funds
pupils in two schools in the China - from Boston awaiting a satisfac-
town section was intended to re-
Sorv eln to correct racial em b -

WASHINGTON (1P) - Congress
tried to ease the arithmetic prob-
lem for price-conscious shoppers
yesterday by passing a packaging
and labeling bill.
It also pushed nearer final de-
cisions such items as funds for
the fight against poverty and aid
to education - part of President
Johnson's blueprint for a Great
Society - in hopes of getting
through by Saturday at the latest.
The campaign to get a quick
increase in Social Security behe-
fits died, with promises it would be
revived as soon as Congress meets
again in January.
The Senate approved allocation
of $6.1 billion in aid for grade
and high schools for two more
years. This is about $1.7 billion
more than Johnson asked.
The measure contains a provi-
sion allowing the education com-
missioner to hold up funds for
schools still segregated, but pro-
vides a hearing must be held
within 60 days after announce-
ment of the deferral. The House,
which has voted to require a for-
mal hearing before deferral, must
approve the measure.
The Senate Appropriations Com-
mittee added about $100 million
to the $1.5 billion the House had
approved for the campaign against
poverty.
The funds are in a catch-all ap-F
propriations bill totaling $5.09
billion, including the antipoverty

funds, some $1.4 billion for aid to
education and $24.2 million for
metropolitan planning and a start
on the President's plan to erase
slum blight in selected cities. The
total sum is about $177 million
more than the House has ap-
proved.
. A possible battle between the
Senate and House looms over trade
with Communist-bloc nations. The
House has voted against the ad-
ministration's plan to expand
trade with Poland, Hungary,
Czechoslovakia and Bulgaria. The
Senate Appropriations Committee

voted to leave decisions on the flood control projects with an es-
trade question to the President. I timated federal cost of about $613
The Senate approved the pack- million. The Senate has approved
aging and labeling bill by voice an $821-million program.
vote, thus sending it to the White E The drive to increase Social
House. It provides for increased Security benefits this year died in
government regulations on the the House Ways and Means Com-r
labeling and packaging of food, mittee. Chairman.Wilbur D. Mills,
drugs, cosmetics and household D-Ark., told newsmen it will be
supplies. It calls for more unifor- the first item of business for the
mity in labeling packages and vol- committee when the new Congress
untary moves toward uniformity meets in January. In proposing the
in packaging. increase, President Johnson had
The House passed by voice vote isuggestedthat Congress consider
a bill to authorize construction of it next year and make it effective
navigation, beach erosion and Jan. 1, 1968.

move them from the racially im-
balanced category.
Chairman William G. Saltonstall
of the State Board of Education
said yesterday ."I have been
brought up to believe there is a
white race, a black race, a yellow
race, and the Chinese are of the
yellow race."
Saltonstall said he did not be-
lieve the state board would accept
the classification - "I know I
won't."
Among the Chinese-American
adults, there was mixed reaction.
Ging Hing Chin, father of five
school-age children, said he
"couldn't understand why they did
it-it bothers me."
A mother of three children who
declined use of her name said, "We
are proud of our race but what
the committee says doesn't change
our ancestry.,,
School Committeeman Joseph
Lee, member of an old Boston
family, sponsored the switch which
the committee unanimously adopt-
ed.

LVf y Jima tit)uJ * i l cu . = , l fl ilum
ance in the city's schools.
The committee has appealed to
the courts, seeking. to have the
state racial imbalance law declared
unconstitutional.
Under the state formula which
terms racially imbalanced any
school with over 50 per cent non-
white, Boston has 46 schools in
conflict with the law. There are
191 public schools in the city.
One city proposal was rejected
twice by the state board which
said it did not effectively reduce
racial imbalance.
A School Committee spokesman
said the school department would
not feel the effect of the State
withholding funds until next Jan-
uary. He explained that the 1966
budget was approved months ago
and made no provision for the
Sstate funds.
"We'll have a problem with next
year's budget if the city doesn't
get the state funds," the spokes-
man said.

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__________________________________________ II

World News Roundup

By The Associated Press Peace Prize will not be awarded
WASHINGTON-Sen. George D. this year. The Norwegian Nobel
Aiken expressed hope yesterday Committee announced the deci-
that President Johnson would de- sion yesterday and ,as usual, gave
clare at the Manila meeting that no reason for withholding the
the United States has won the prize.
military war in. Viet Nam and The award, amounting to 300,-
"that this stage of the Viet Nam 000 Swedish kroner, or about $59,-
war is over." 315, can revert to the Nobel Peace
Such a declaration, the Vermont Prize fund or be granted next
Republican told the Senate, should
be accompanied by "gradual re- year. , , ,
deployment of U.S. military forces.
around strategic centers and the BOSTON - The Christian Sci-
substitution of intensive recon- ence Monitor said yesterday in a
naissance for bombing." copyright story from Washington
Aiken's proposals drew praises that the administration is "sit-
from Senate Democratic Leader ting on" a secret Commerce De-
Mike Mansfield of Montana and partment study, which, if releas-
Sen. J. W. Fulbright (D-Ark), ed, "could seriously undermine
chairman of the Senate Foreign President Johnsons' efforts to
Relations Committee, of which Ai- keep wage settlements down." j
ken and Mansfield are members. The paper said that the survey
* * revises statistics reported by the
OSLO, Norway - The Nobel Council of Economic Advisers in

1963 which stated that labor pro-
ductivity-output per man hour-
was increasing at a rate of 3.2 per{
cent on the average.
Since 1963, the 3.2 per cent
figure has been used as the logi-
cal ceiling on yearly wage in-
creases. Many of the old statis-
tics were accepted postwar fig-
ures.
The catch is that most of the
old statistics were wrong, the Mon-
itor said.

IN 1965 THE.U.S.
DEPT. OF STATE SELECTED
THE U OF M JAZZ BAND
AS THE FINEST UNIVERSITY
JAZZ BAND IN THE NATION
TO TOUR 15 LATIN
AMERICAN COUNTRIES
FOR FOUR MONTHS.
NOW THE SCHOOL, OF MUSIC
PRESENTS THE 18-PIECE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
BAND

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4 Soviet Leaders Visit Siberia;
New Space Attempt Possible

WARSAW, Poland - Poland's
1956 breakaway from Soviet con-
trol was portrayed by the War-
saw regime yesterday as a correc-
tion of the Communist party line.
A laudatory review of party
chief Wladyslaw Gomulka's 10-
year rule appeared in Trybuna Lu-
du, organ of Gomulka's Polish!
United oWrkers party, and other
papers.

IN
CONCERT
BRUCE W. FISHER,
DIRECTOR

WITH SPECIAL GUEST ARTIST
JACK BROKENSHA
THE INTERNATIONALLY FAMOUS
ORIGINAL MEMBER OF THE AUSTRALIAN JAZZ QUINTET
TOMORROW NIGHT, 8:30 P.M., HILL AUDITORIUM
NO RESERVED SEATING. TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE
AT DISCOUNT RECORDS OR FRIDAY NIGHT AT THE DOOR
ADMISSION ONLY $1.00

MOSCOW 0P)-The leaders of
nine Communist countries appar-
ently traveled to Siberia from
Moscow yesterday, perlhaps to view
a Soviet space shoot. Some reports
spoke of a spectacular space break-
through involving more than two
cosmonauts.
Secrecy barred any official
word, however, either on the
launch or on the activities of the
visiting Red Chiefs since their ar-
rival Monday.
Nevertheless, indications point-
ed to a secret departure yesterday
for Novosibirsk, the Soviet scien-
tific research center in Siberia.
The leaders were expected to fly
4* to Baikonur on Thursday for the
launch.
Communist sources said the
group began summit talks Tuesday
on the Viet Nam problem and on
Chinese obstruction of Soviet-bloc
aid sent to Hanoi across China.
These sources also reported the
. plans for the trip to Novosibirsk
and Baikonur, the launch center
1,400 miles southeast of Moscow.
The Russians have not an-
nounced a manned space flight in
the 19 months since Alexei Leonov

took the first space walk. In this
period, nine two-man U.S. Gemi-
ni flights have taken all space
records away from the Soviet Un-
ion.
A West Berlin observatory re-
ported the launching of a Soviet
satellite Wednesday. But a spokes-
man at the Bochum Observatory
in West Germany said later the
signals came from a Soviet satel-
lite that had been orbiting since
Monday.
U.S. space officials in Washing-
ton said the launch report ap-
peared to be in error, and the big
British observatory at Jo&.ell
Bank said it hadn't picked up any
signals.
In the past, the Russians have
sent up unmanned satellites as
dry runs for manned launchings.
They launched No. 129 in their un-
manned Cosmos series last Friday
and that may be what the German
observatories were hearing.
Reports that the Red chiefs
would view a launching received
added weight when it became clear
that defense ministers are making
the trip.

1-

TODAY, Promptly
Arena Theatre

4:10 P.M.
Frieze Building

i

MIME TROUPE MINSTREL ? SHOW

IMPROMPTU
by TAD MOSEL
Department of Speech
Student Laboratory Theatre Program
Admission Free

IT'S GREAT. . .

E

A :.....

'::?i':"":....+.1. ':: : .::. ... .
ARE YOU
EMBARRASSED?
Need To Know
More About
The Underground?
Don't miss ACLU Films

-------- ---r ---- -------- ------------------m- m
! f
! f
r f
r r
J r
/ r
I CINEMAGUL E;Ie.kt9
/I
r r
1 1
I 1
1 1
SOct. 20 and 21
SUBIDO AL CIELO
(Mexican Bus Ride)
rU
r (dir. Luis Bunuel-1951)
Spanish, subtitles. A rare glimpse of the comic
side of one of the world's most grim and bril-
liant directors. /
r r
SHORTS: "DOUGH & DYNAMITE" &;
"THE RINK"-Chaplin
r f
r r
1 r
Thursday & Friday
S7 0 9

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The minstrel show was an indiginous
American art form, which intentionally and
by acquiscence contributed to the humilia-
tion of the American Negro. For Ronnie
Davis and the Mime Troupe to take this
form and attempt to make it a vehicle
for the pride, anger, and satire of the
"new" Negro is acourageous and creative
oct. There is power and irony in the idea;
it is a threatrical idea,
The show hustles. The actors move in
a flash from rambling, shapeless jokes or
incidents into a tight frieze or structured
movement. Transitions are particularly
brilliant. The minstrel idea is used well:
a dance, a few wisecracks, a draamtic in-

cident, a speech, evolve into one another.
The audience's expectations ore reversed.
You're not allowed to react the way you
wanted to; your attention is demanded.
There is one scene where the show is at
its best:
The minstrels decide to show the aud-
ience something. After some wrangling, all
leave but three. Two are to be teenagers,
the third a white cop. The cop-minstrel
goes off. The two kid-minstrels lounge in
front of four chairs that are a hardware
store in Harlem. They're still kidding, but
the kidding is of two kids, not minstrels.
Then the cop enters: he's still in minstrel
clothes and wears a hat that says WHITE
COP. You're back in the Show, but the
"actors" keep merging into the characters.
You begin to feel the fear, of the cop, of
the kids. It seems real. The kids are
fooling around, the cop pushes them, they
push back, too much, the cop fires. Freeze.
A boy in Harlem is dead. The other kneels.
'Freeze. It is shocking (the only really
shocking scene in the show) because it's
honest. Then the other mnstrels file back
on, make a quiet joke, the dead boy
stands up. The actors are pulled back into
the Show. The interlocutor comes on,
everyone's a minstrel again.
Tickets at Centicore
Book Store; Herb David's
Guitar Studio; for
information call 761-5140

A MINSTREL SHOW, or "CIVIL
RIGHTS IN A CRACKLE BARREL"
Produced by the S.F. Mime Troupe,
directed by R. G. Davis

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MARC-ALEXANDER
As Simme

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PROGRAM NOTES
What is a Minstrel Show? Some of you over 40 may have
seen one. Those under 40 are not supposed to know about them.

the material available did not talk about what we know, and
feared. The Minstrel for miends itself to some of the subjects
that confront us. It is an epic form, an open stage form where
social subjects can be bounced around and not reduced to 'adjust-
ment psychology.'

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