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October 20, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-20

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY. OCTOBER 210. 1966

PAGE TWO 'tilE MICHIGAN DAILY THIIRA~DAV flr~TAR1'R 911 1ORA - -- - --'--- -- -. - - ---a- ~v, .4/v.

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IV

THEATRE
Brevity of Impromptu' Saves
Mosel Play from Uncertainties

Across

CANDIDATE IN PHILOSOPHY:
Spurr Promotes New Graduate Degree

Campus

(Continued from Page 1)
THURSDAY, OCT. 20didate should be one who has met
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will and passed a level of attainment,
present Luis Bunnel's "Subido Al and not one who has failed .
Cielo" in the Architecture Aud. The intermediate degree should
8 p.m. - The APA Repertory not be a consolation prize. It
Company will perform in Bald- should rather be a formal rec-
ridge's "We, Comrades Three" in npnition of positive achievement

By J. F. PERKIN
"Impromptu," by Tad Mosel, is
a play with "meaning."
Written when Mosel was a stu-
dent at Yale, the play's main de-
fect seems to stem from the play-
wright's uncertainties about the
ability of his chosen medium to
communicate such "meaning"
leading to an overlading of "mes-
sages," whereby the playwright's
insights are intruded rather than
interwoven into his work.
Fortunately, however, the brev-
ity of "Impromptu" affords inter-
esting performances, the oppor-
tunity of rescuing the play from
tediousness, and for the most part
the Student Lab Theatre produc-
tion is able to carry out such a
rescue. The lab production man-

ages to lead the play through
those areas where the playwright
shows a heavy hand without sac-
rificing its audience in the proc-
ess.
Paula Marchese, as Winifred,
an actress whose career has con-
sisted of playing "the leading
lady's best friend," does an ex-
cellent job of portraying a world-
ly, cynical woman unable to eith-
er give or receive in her rela-
tions with other actors or other
people. Miss Marchese is unable
to inject believability into the
change of heart her character
must undergo during the play;
indeed, the play allows no room
for such an infusion of credibility.
Her performance is extremely viv-
id and enjoyable, nonetheless,

Steering Committee Seeksj
To Intiate Tangible Reform'

. .;

(Continued from Page 1) C
nars" in which personal cownsel-
ing will come from upperclass stu-
dents-senior concentrates in a
particular area..
Unwilling Judges
"Counselors," commented Litven,
are often unwilling to make a val-
ue judgment concerning the qual-
ity of a particular course or in-
structor. Students themselves gen-
erally feel more free to express
themselves honestly on academic
concerns."
The committee has begun an
examination of pre-classification
procedures to determine where the
University bureaucracy is least ef-
ficient and how the pre-registra-
tion system could be improved to
benefit the students.
More Than a Weak Voice
"We are aiming," said Litven,
"to be something more than a
weak voice. Students have nb right
to even ask for a voice unless they

are doing something active and ef-
fective."
The steering committee is now
launching student academic advi-
sory committees at the department
level as well Bob Golden, '67, past
chairman of the steering commit-
tee said that three such under-
graduate' student groups are cur-
rently being set up in the psychol-
ogy, sociology, and anthropology
departments.
"These," he said, "are mere be-
ginnings and are just getting off
the ground. We don't intend to
stop, however, at the experimental
stage in three departments .
there's much more to come."
DIAL 5-6290
Ending Tonight

working inside the play to give it
a much needed wit to counterbal-
ance the weight of its message.
John Haber, as Tony, a young
would-be actor, is given a char-
acter whose only virtue is sincer-
ity. Haber contributes greatly to
the play by portraying Tony as
sincere and self-questioning with-
out a degeneration into total sac-
charinity.
Martha Fleischer does a com-
petent job in portraying Lora, an
ingenue, as an ingenue. Limited
by a one-dimensional part, she
nonetheless manages to fill that~
dimension completely and inter-
estingly. Ernest, "a debonair, but
aging leading man," is an ex-
tremely affected character; John
Slade unfortunately weakens any
impact which the character might
possess with an affected perform-
ance; he contributes to the au-
thor's trend towards caricaturiza-
tion rather than characterization,
and thus points up the belabor-
ings of Mosel, while depriving the
playwright's views of human value.
Slade cannot be faulted too severe-
ly, however, for he, as are the oth-
ers, is given an extremely limit-
ed character to portray.
Thus, "Impromptu," under the
direction of Barbara Bailey, suc-
ceeds, not despite the play, but
rather because those participating
in it have been able to bring out
its virtues and minimize its de-
fects.
CINEMIA
presents
Saturday Night
and
Sunday Morning
Starring ALBERT FINNEY
FRIDAY & SAT.
7 &'9 P.M.
Aud. A, A.H.
50c
LD. Required
Short: The Moon Bird
(Academy Award 1959)

the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.-
8 p.m.-William W. Cook Lec-
ture Series Lecture on American
Institutions will present Prof. Gil-
bert F. White of the University of
Chicago speaking on "Strategies
of American Water Management-
Resolving Ambiguity - What the
Public Wants in Water Quality",
in the Rackham Amphitheatre.
FRIDAY, OCT. 21
4:15 p.m.-Prof. Carl Schweit-
zer of the political science de-
partment at the Free University
of Berlin will speak on "Germany-
De Gaulle-Europe" in the third
floor music room in the -Union.
8:30 p.m. - The U of M Jazz
Band, conducted by Bruce Fisher,
will perform in Hill Aud.

of having completed an advanced
state in graduate study";
0 The degree should have a
new title which will with time take
on an appropriate status. "With
more than three hundred master's
degree titles currently being used,
it hardly seems plausible to expect
the world of higher education-
and much less the general public-
to attach prestige to yet another.
However modified, it will still be
a master's degree.";
Candidate in Philosophy
" "The best name for this de-
gree is Candidate in Philosophy."
Spurr gives two reasons for this:
the degree relates to candidacy for
the doctorate and it names a well-
accepted European degree. In the

I

Join the "EAT-IN"

Soviet Union, the degree of Candi-E
date of Sciences is normally
awarded to the graduate student,
at the completion of his formalc
studies, while the degree of Doctor%
of Sciences is awarded in recog-i
nition of scholarly achievementc
usually many years later. Finland,I
Norway, Sweden and Denmark allt
offer the Candidate degree-either
in philosophy, science, or a desig-
nated field of specialization.-
* There is no conflict betweeni
an intermediate philosophical de-P
gree and a terminal specialized or!
professional degree. Spurr pointed
out, for example, that there would X
be no conflict between a terminalt
specialized degree for college3
teachers at the intermediate level,

SNEAK PREVIEW
Tonight at 8:15
First Showing of MORGAN-Tonight only at 6:50
Preview at 8:15-then MORGAN will be repeated
"HIGH LOW COMEDY. It is a strange and effecting film that
should not be passed by."-PAUL SAWYER, Michigan Daily

at the Hillel DELI HOUSE.

I

Concept Not New
In his paper, Spurr points out
that the concept of an advanced
intermediate degree between. the
Masters and Ph.D. is not a new
one.
Programs similar to the pro-
posed candidate's degree have
been considered at two other ma-
jor universities. Last May Yale
University announced the estab-E

I

I

they shall have completed all re-
quirments for the Ph.D. but thA
dissertation.
The University of California at
Berkeley is also considering the
establishment of a degree of Doc-
tor of Arts, requiring preparation
equivalent to that normally re-
quired for advancement to candi-
dacy for the Ph.D., but without
requiring a dissertation.

and the proposed candidate's de- lishment of a Master of Philos-
gree. "While it may be assumed ophy degree to replace the tradi-
that many holders of this latter tional Master of Arts and Master
degree will be qualified for and of Science degrees. Spurr indicated
will accept teaching positions -in that this degree is closely com-
junior colleges and four-year lib- parable to the concept of the Can-
eral arts colleges, so also may didate's degree, and is to be avail-
holders of any specialized degree able to students beginning grad-
that may evolve in coming years." uate work in the fall of 1968 when

"BRILLIANT"
-Brendon (il.rheXew 'Trk'er
MORGAN!

M

I

I

I TODAY! I

rAA7;M -

- Program
Information
NO 2-6264

i

CARVING A LEGEND OF GREATNESS...
from the Blue Ridge to the Rio Grande I

Due to our overflow crowds, reservations are essential!

Phone 482-2056
Enw n e0* PENTER ROD
OPEN 5 :30' P.M.
NOW SHOWING
-FREE HEATERS--

2 KOSHER
CORN BEEF SANDWICHES
or PASTRAMI

$1.25 non-members
$1.00 members

i

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atmosphere, music, flowers, poetry-plus pickles and soda

SUNDAYS
at 5:30 P.M.

RESERVATIONS
663-4129

Mon.-Thurs.
9-12 A.M.
1-5 P.M.
7-10 P.M.

Shown at 9:30 Only
B UAR-LO' SIJi\I N I N lyl) NA I JI F URYHW
srAN LES E RNE WRRSIVNS 8W
REANORMPRI(ER Reborah' NR MCtER
TUng Curtis
Natalie Wood
Henrg Fonda
Lauren Bacall
Mel Ferrer
Shown at 7:00 Only
LESLIE PARRISH and EDWARD EVERETT HORTON
YECHNICOLOR® From WARNER BROS.
PLUS-
"WHEN FISH FIGHT"
2 COLOR CARTOONS

ST ,ArRIh '
Stephen Boyd. Raque l Welch, Edmond
O'Brien, Donald PleasencmArthur 0'Conel

TONITE THRU SUNDAY!

I

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Ur

GUILD HOUSE-802 Monroe
FRIDAY-October 21
Noon Luncheon . . . 25c
concluding series
"The Role of the Military in U.S."
-an appraisal

LLVIIIEZ KELLY
CO-STARRING
WRTTEN BY MUSIC BY PRODUCED BY DIRECTED BY
[RN~lt1N -JUgPRIR Jc - [DAP1J DMRYK-'PANO M[r1JMOIAGWR
MHEA.TIa OTHERS FOUR SING "ALVAREZ KELLY"N COLUMBIA RECOS
Today at 0 1:00-3:00-5:10-7:20-9:30

Friday evening at Guild
SING-IN
Bring your songs and guitars
Come any time after 8 P.M.
(Italian Dinner at 6 P.M.)

I

ri o i

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I

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U

,: Y
DON JUAN IN HELL
presented by the
METROPOLITAN DRAMA QUARTET
what the critics say:
"I recommend it."-D. Juan
T he Canterbury House is going to hell."-H. Bogart
"There is no hel."-Rev. D. Burke
"Hell?"-H. Hatcher
Chirp."-Charles
The audience is invited to remain for
coffee and discussion with the players
In order to establish the proper atmosphere the
heat will be turned up to maximum capacity a

4 Shows Daily at 1:00-3:35-6:15-9:00-Regular Prices
"Devil-may-care dogfights in the skies...
devil-may-care love affairs on the ground."
-N.Y. TIMES

"'The Blue Max' is visually magnificent."
-NEWSWEEK

4
'4

I~ ~~~~H IEE* - ' r.I

Gu jv. ju"" m

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