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October 12, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-12

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PAGE TWO-

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1966

PAGE TWO THE MIChIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1966

FILMS-
'Fantastic Voyage' Inside Body
Is New Science Fiction Idea

California's White Backlash
Threatens Brown's Election

By ROBERT KLIVANS
Over the summer, in one of
thoserdeep moments of medita-
tion, I came to the conclusion that
Science Fiction Movies had run
out of ideas. We had been to the
moon and the center of the earth
with Jules Verne, back in time and
to Mars with H. G. Wells, and to
the other side of those impassable
cliffs with King Kong.
And then along comes the Fan-
tastic Voyage, about the most
novel idea out of Hollywood since
Steamboat Willie ushered in car-
toons and the most expensive
science fiction film ever. This time
the gimmick is a journey through
the human body with a submarine
and crew minituarized to the size
of a microbe.
The plot is predictable, as usual,
and the dialogue often is a bit
melodramatic (though what would

you say while speeding through a
lymph node?)
Even the acting is mediocre,
though Raquel Welch's appearance:
(poured voluptiously into a skin
diving suit) in the bloodstream
probably made the red corpuscles
happier than any time since their
vaccination.
Yet the movie will be remem-
bered-and mainly because of the
fascinating special effects, or, if
one may use the term inside the
body, the scenery.
From the moment they are jet-
tisoned through the tip of the
hypodermic needle, till 60 minutes
later when they emerge-sans sub
--from the tear duct of the eye,
the viewer is barraged by pano-
ramas inside the arteries, heart,
lungs, and brain.
Even if the red corpuscles look
like ballons in Macy's Thanksgiv-
ing Day Parade, and the white

corpuscles resemble overflowing
cotton candy, nonetheless, some-
one should be given credit for
thinking up and designing the
whole thing.
So what if the brain looks like
a spider-webbed cave on the
Fourth of July?
So what if ferocious antibodies
attack Miss Welch? (After all,
they have good taste.)
It's all in the spirit of a movie
that is exciting and implausibly
captivating, a movie that is ap-
preciated by swallowing the whole
thing and letting your imagination
run free. Three cheers to the team
of screenwriters and producers
who gave science fiction cinema a
shot in the arm-or inside the arm
-just when it is needed.
And surely there will be a small
band of followers awaiting the
sequel-with a Fantastic Voyage
somewhere else.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. VP) -
Racial strife and voter hostility to
open housing laws have raised
fears among California Democrats
that a white backlash will hurt
Gov. Edmund G. Brown's chances
for reelection.
Both Brown and his Republican
opponent, Ronald Reagan, have
said they'll try to avoid playing
politics with last week's rioting in
San Francisco Negro districts.
A Brown aide said the governor's
action in calling out the National
Guard "came off so well there
doesn't seem to be any backlash."
But he echoed private fears in
the Brown camp when he said,
"You always figure you're an auto-
matic loser when you have trouble.
You're the manager of the team
and you take the losses."
The violence, just six weeks be-
fore the election, renewed talk of
the racial issue-a major one in
1964 when Californians, by a more
than 2-1 vote, adopted a constitu-
tional amendment that nullified

the state law requiring open hous-
ing.
This year, the California Su-
preme C o u r t overturned the
amendment. That sparked a cam-
paign by one group to defeat the
justices who voted against the
amendment.
Brown blamed a white backlash:
for helping Mayor Samuel W
Yorty of Los Angeles make a
strong, but losing, showing against
him in the June primary for the
Democratic nomination.
Despite their "no politics" state-
ments, Brown and Reagan criti-
cized each other during and after
the San Francisco riots.
Reagan said, "The governor
hasn't the courage to stand up to
the so-called leaders who apologize
for or excuse taking to the streets
and bloodshed."
Brown said, "I think it would be
highly dangerous to have any mo-
tion picture actor who never play-
ed governor handling a situation
like this."
There is a issue over what both
candidates call extremism. Rea-
gan criticized Brown for accept-
ing the support of the California
Democratic Council, a volunteer
group which opposes President
Johnson's Viet Nam policy. Brown
demanded Reagan denounce the
John Birch Society.
They also disagree over what
to do about student conduct at the
University of California at Berke-
ley.
Reagan has continually criti-
cized what he calls a small ele-
ment of student demonstrators.
Once he advocated a legislative
investigation, but later said "I
made a wrong proposal" and call-
ed on John McCone, former direc-
tor of the Central Intelligence
Agency, to appoint an investigat-
ing commission.
"We don't need a CIA man to
come in here to investigate,' re-
plied Brown.
He said the university edminis-
tration has solved the problems
that touched off rowdy student
demonstrations.

CINEIMA
II
Presents
PETER SELLERS
GEORGE C. SCOTT
R.R
SIRANGiELOVE
THURSDAY
FRIDAY &
SATURDAY
7 & 9:15 P.m.
Aud. A, Angell Hall
l.D. required 50c

Men
5Cc

The BLUE WINDOW

MIXER

UPittl
UPSTAIRS

Friday

0 Dining rooms 1 & 3

0 Friday

*

II

SOUTH QUAD
University Players presen t
William Shakespeare' s
COlRIOLAI.N US'
Toni ght Through Saturday

Girls
50c

C AM RANH BAY PROJECT:
Viet Port Improved for Military Use

By PETER ARNETT
CAM RANH BAY, South Viet-
nam (MP-From a sandy wasteland
for mosquitoes and lizards just 18
months ago, this isolated peninsula
has become as congested as mod-
ern suburbia. It even has a traffic
problem.
War that destroys also builds,
and nowhere in embattled Viet-
nam is this more true than at Cam
Ranh Bay, once the lonelinest bit
of territory along the coast.
UT.. Army engineers and civilian
constructors have torn down the
sand dunes, filled in the valleys,
floated .pontoon wharves across
the oceans of the world, fought
shortages and bitter rivalries, and
conquered a petulant nature that
floods Cam Ranh peninsula half
the year and roasts it the rest.
The Cam Ranh waterfront,
handling nearly 200,000 tons of
cargo a month, now rivals Saigon.
The supply depot will be the big
gest military installation of its
kind in the world.
Rows of tanks for petroleum,
oil and lubricants are marching
across the dunes. They will even-
tually hold 50 million gallons. Con-
crete ammunition pads cluster the
South China Sea coast, each one
surrounded to that the explosion
of one won't explode the others.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS-is available to officially
recognized and registered student or
ganizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
Southern Asia Club, Friday bag lunch
on Oct. 14 at 12 noon in Lane Hall.
Slide lecture on Laos.
Alpha Phi Omega, Meeting, Oct. 12,
7 p.m., Room 3-A, Michigan Union.
Crop and Saddle Coed Riding Club,
Riding and tryouts for drill team,
Oct. 13 and 20, 6:30 p.m, meet at
Women's Athletic Bldg.
** *
Newman Student Association, Inter-
faith parley, Oct. 12, 8 p.m., Newman
Center, 331 Thompson.
Newman Student Association, New-
man Wyrd meeting, Oct. 12, 9 p.m.,
Newman Center, 331 Thompson. Any-
one Interested in joining the theatri-
cal group is welcome.
Christian Science Organization, Tes-
timony meeting, Thurs., Oct. 13, 7:30-
8:30 p.m., Room 3545 SAB.
Le Cerde Francais, Le Baratin-en-
joy, a French atmosphere, Thurs., Oct.
13, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
e* r
Young Americans for Freedom, An
invitation for all anti-war groups to
hear and debate Duane Thorn, author
of "A Ride to Panmunjon" and num-
erous articles on psychological war-
fare, on U.S. policy in Viet Nam. No
admission charge, Wed., Oct. 12, 4
p.m., Room 3-A, Michigan Union.
Phone 482-2056
EaaaaAPE NERR Itu
FREE HEATERS-OPEN 6:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
IT TEARS YOU APART WITH SUSPENSE!
PAUL JULIE
REUIIIAN RARDREUIS
RARED
HITCCDCK'S,
Only CURTAIR'
AUNIERSAL PICTURE TECHNICOLORA~
ALSO,.
The Story of a
Wild One!
Tiav.n

There will be more than 100,000
tons of varied ammunitions stored
in these pads, everything from
rifle bullets to the sophisticated
CBU cluster bombs used by the
Air Force.
A modern port is being built to
unload the 20 to 30 ships that
congest Cam Ranh at a time. In
addition to the old concrete pier
built initially by the 'French for
the Foreign Legion, there are three
new piers. These have been floated
to Vietnam, one all the way from
Charleston, S.C., by way of the
Suez Canal and the Indian Ocean,
a distance of 12,000 miles.
Cam Ranh port now has facil-
ities for handling 12 ocean going
cargo ships at a time. The berths
always are full.
"Cam Ranh is no longer a
dream, but a reality," says Maj.
Gen. Charles W. Eifler, command-
er of the U.S. Army's 1st Logistics
Command. '
Eifler recalled how in January
this year, with the shifting sands
miring vehicles and projects bog-
ging down for the want of mate-
rials, there was real doubt about
the wisdom in choosing Cam
Ranh for a major base installa-
tion.
"People began to wonder if it
was a good idea," Eifler said.
"There is no doubt of that today."
Eifler took over the Logistics
Command in.January and brought
in a new Cam Ranh Bay construc-

tion commander, Brig. Gen. Arthur
L. Friedman, from Warrensburg,
Mo. He convinced the Air Force
that work on the new Cam Ranh
jet airstrip had to be delayed so
civilian contractors could help in
the port and warehouse installa-
tions, and broke through the dead-
lock.
Only half the "hardstands"
needed to keep outside supplies off
the sand will be completed by the
time the monsoon comes in No-
vember. And warehousing space is
not being erected as fast as some
hoped.
The 35th Engineer Group is
handling the Army installation
construction, assisted by the
RMK-BRJ construction consor-
tium that has contracts worth
$110 million in Cam Ranh. These
contracts include erection of a
deep water pier for ammunition
unloading, a causeway more than
half a mile long, 36 Army ware-
houses, and a new 10,000-foot con-
crete jet runway that should be
ready for use in October. Four
U.S. Air Force F4C Phantom jet
squadrons are based at Cam
Ranh, using a temporary alumi-
num airstrip built by RMK-BRJ.
The Cam Ranh peninsula is 15
miles long, an area of about 100
square miles. The U.S. Navy has
the southern -tip, the Army the
central part, then comes .the air-
base, and at the northern end an
Army replacement center and a

convalescent hospital. Space is
now limited.
A Korean marine battalion pro-
vides security. But Cam Ranh is
probably the quietest place in
Vietnam. Not a shot has been fired
in anger this year. The Viet Cong
haven't bothered to hit Cam Ranh,
probably deterred by the difficul-
ties in getting in close.
Traffic has become so dense on
the new highways lacing through
the peninsula that there is talk of
building a cloverleaf off the am-
munition pier to prevent further
congestion.
The supply depot already stocks
200,000 different items out of the
complete Army listings of 580,000
separate items.

Read and
Use Daily
Classified

October 12-15

Trueblood Auditorium
Box office opens 12:30 p.m. daily

. . * 8 P.M.

i

TONITE THRU SUNDAY!

.-I&
IR

I/i//el

GENERAL MEMBERSHIP
MEETING'
SUNDAY, October 16 at 4:00
REFRESHMENTS

1429 Hill Street

All Are Welcome

DIAL
8-6416

1 ,

ENDS
TON IGHT

PETITIONING for the
Board of
will he held on Oct. 19
from 7:30-11:30
Sign up now for interview
at 2538 SAB

"A truly adult love story!
It is a beautiful film,
finely made !" N
-Judith Crist. M. Y. Herald Tribune
21 A Sgma ll Release
Starts Thursday: "MORGAN": Howlingly Funny!

11

I

11

DIAL
5-6290

Shows at1,
3, 5, 7, 9 P M.

Beyond H. G. Wells and Jules
Verne-an adventure totally

T _ .. __._ _..

new and totally

unexpected !

'1

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SOUTH QUADRANGLE
Friday, October 14
(Where the Action Is)
ALL-CAMPUS
DANCE
MUSIC BY

'I

of gallant love and truly desperate adventure
SUSANWAHI Y©RK
- 'c
r4L
NOW!

4'

DUANE THORIN,
specialist in political warfare,
formerly of the United States Navy,
takes on local talent in a
Debate onVetNam

"a

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