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October 09, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-09

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PAGE TWO _'

THE MIC IIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1966;

TWO TIlE MtCIItC~AN DAILY SUNDAY. OCTOBER 9. 1968

-MUSIC
Chicago Symphony Performs
Exciting Symphony by Nielsen

Pasolini's Gospel' Done with Finesse

I -~

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe

By RICHARD

Q AYERS

By CLARENCE FANTO most of his major works, a motto
Managing Editor theme of great beauty appears and
Lastnight's concert by the-Chi; reappears in different g u i s e s
sago Symphony Orchestra con- throughout the four interconnect-.
ducted by Jean Martinon at Hill ,ed movements of the symphony.
Aud. featured a stirring perform- Nielsen's genius is centered in
once of what must be one of the the uniqjue originality of his mu-
finest symphonies written in this sic, which has roots in, the late
century, ,the Symphony No. 4 by Romanticism of Wagner and
the Danish composer Carl Nielsen. Brahms yet employs progressive
Nielsen's music had been inex- tonality and unorthodox combi-
plicably neglected outside Scan- nations of instruments and har-
dinavia until several years ago monies. The fourth symphony in
when recordings of several of his particular is characterized by an
symphonies appeared in this coun- extremely vigorous rhythmic base,
try. Leonard Bernstein provided , reinforced by kinetic, frenzied tim-
much of the impetus for the Niel- pani solos and accompaniments.
sen revival ii this country by his. Jean Martinon, the Chicago
performances and recor.dins., with Symphony's conduttor, offered a
the New York Philharmonic of sympathetic and exfremely excit-
the third and fifth symphonies. ing interpretation of the Nielsen
The fourth, subtitled "The 'n- work. He managed to pinpoint the
extinguishable,' has r niained un- i otional heights and, the lyrical
known in this country, but it may passages of the symphony with
well be the composer's finest work., great clarity and, when called for,
It abounds -n1wthe atmospheric frenetic. energy. The orchestra
climaxes and tender lyricism which showed itself to be in top form,
&haracterize Nielsen's works. As in with the brass and percussion
REPLY TO BROWN SPEECH.

section distinguishing themselves
by brilliant virtuosity.
Nielsen's music well deserves
the popularity which the sym-
phonic works of Sibelius attained
in this country 20 years ago. By
some unexplained quirk of the
musical pendulum, Sibelius is be-
ing sadly neglected by most of
the nation's major orchestras, but
the continued exposure of Niel-
sen's magnificent symphonic works
should help serve to restore Sibe-
lius to his rightful place as one
of this century's greatest sym-
phonists. Nielsen as well deserves
to share the spotlight as he is in
many ways an even more profound
composer whose music is likely
to rival Bartok and Stravinsky
in long-run importance.
The second major work on last
night's program was Martinon's
own Symphony No. 4, especially
commissioned for the 75th anni-
versary of the Chicago Symphony
this year.

The Bible has suffered more
misrepresentations on film than
all other books put together,
Hollywood defiling the New Testa-
ment and Italian spectaculars con-
centrating on the Old Testament.
At last, Christians and movie-
goers are able to breathe a sigh of
relief; Palo Pasolini, an Italian,
has made not just a sufficient
Gospel adaptation, but a truly su-
perb one. This is not the Gospel
According to Hollywood, but the
"Gospel According to St. Mat-
thew," rendered with finesse by
Pasolini.
Realistic World
The film presents a strikingly
realistic world of Jesus, but not to
the detriment of the legendary
and mythological beauty of the
Book. The common people of the
villages and Jerusalem are recog-
nizable to the modern man; the
environment of the story must be
thus to the relevant to us. And
Joseph, Mary, and Jesus are not
idealized visually-they are honest
and good but not the demigods
of medieval representation. While
the medieval man could only re-
act to the idealized version of the
story, that becomes remote and ir-
relevant for us. Through Pasolini,
the mystical becomes believable.
Not Professionals
Pasolini's realism is enhanced by
the straight, to the point of being
humble, camera angle. Jesus walks
with men on the earth and objects
to inequities on the earth. The
camera records but does not ob-
struct. Cutting takes the place of
the rhythm of poetry - and the
poetry does not have the dramatic
the
vpCHURCH 'O
and
I PICKET LINES, {
ETC.
hear-

peaks of a Hollywood movie. It is' serve to compliment rather than
a steady, almost cold, narrative dominate the visual creation.
rhythm. Biblical Literature
Pasolini's actors are not profes- This film, inspired by Karl Marx
sionals. They are people he knew and Pope John XXIII, forces the
or met who he asked merely to be non-believer to consider Biblica!
themselves. It is not their job to literature seriously and the be-
represent the characters; they are liever to take a second look. How
merely objects which he manipu- can any of the far from perfect'
lates and interprets. The beauty of states today call themselves Chris-
tian? Jesus revealed the corrup-
the characters is a result of Paso- tionofestshmenthichrstil
lini's work. Enrique Irazoqui, an tion of establishments which still
economics student in a Spanish exist, but in his name. The only
university, plays Jesus; Margherite place for a Christian, says the film,
Caruso, with a face as beautiful thecommonheopoin ail.
as a Byzantine mosaic, plays Mary. _e common people or in jail.
All the characters fit in their parts
because they have the particular Phone 482-2056
features and disposition necessary i
for them. I

t
r
Y

Radio Hanoi Rejects Offer
Of British for Geneva Talk

Monday, Oct. 10

Noon Luncheon 25c

TOKYO (I?)- - North Viet Nam, ful n
continuing to shut its ears to peace Presid
calls; yesterday turned down Bri- A c
-tain's siX-point proposal for peace istPa
in iViet Nan.stP
"Hanoi said the British govern-
xnent "is but a rusty loudspeaker cord,
Which clumsily parrots- the 'peace- new e
Nor
propo
To, DomHnat retay
Thurs
Musi etion,v
HSIC OWdetail
peace
Gener
Electronic sounds, audio-articu- Arthui
l staed-ighting,- and pop pbttles are The
all parntof what's happening this
Monday night at 8:30 p.m.: in the
School.1of Music Recital. Hall. It's
the first in,. a series of fo ur pres-.
entations hy° the comaposition. de ;
partment, where you can try your
mind at something a little out of
f eotdriary i 4ri
The program is more than just
a concert, for it offers the aud
,ence a chance to participate in
experiencing nnew, direcions in
muusic; to forl'ow the composers in-
'oareas of experimentation with
k'oth the conv iions instruments
cf the past, wnd those of the
future.
The works t-rosit of David
F~oley's "Two Ilt6enents for Brass
Quintet," David Robbins' "String
ndri"Notes from the Under-
ground," a c~oyiaton.y Robert
~Morris, using piano, cello, celeste,
percussion and pop bottles, Jeremy
,Lutig's "Music' for, Violin, Cello,
and Percussion," a special per-
formance of Harvey Sollberger's
Grand Quartet for Flutes," Syd-
npey Hodkinson's "'Drawing's No,
',with solo violin played by
:Chuck - Avsharian, and Russell
P'eck's "The Lion's Share," in
w~hich the tape and light material'
evolved from-research on hypnosis'
a~nd primitive. cultures' drum cere.-
: ponies.
CONCERTT0RiT
FEATUFUNG
THE TOKENS

negotiations' hoax of the other step taken by the British
dent Johnson .clique."w 1 government in trailing after the
.,<mentary'i he commun- U.S. aggressors, in shielding and
,rty organ Nhan Dan broad-pleading for them and betraying
y Hanoi radio declared "in a even more seriously the commit-
government'sments and responsibility of a co-
the Braniischairman of the Geneva confer-
mt plan did not bring any n,"Hnisd.
lement." - ence," Hanoi said.
th Viet Nam said the British Referring to Brown's proposal
)sal offered by Foreign Sec-that the United States resume the
____ bombing of North Viet Nam only
See Earlier Story, Page 3 when peace talks fail, the com-
_.._.---mentary said:
George Brown in a speech "This was but a rehash of re-
day "was only a presenta- peated U.S. blackmail and was
with a few minor so-called only aimed at equating those who
s," of the U.S. three-point commit aggression with the victim
program put before the U.N. of aggression."
al Assembly by Ambassador North Viet Nam's conditions for
xr J. Goldberg, last mont"h.. peace include an unconditional
British proposal "marks an- halt to the bombing.
a Don't be confused by
Chaucer-get Cliff's
Notes. In language
that's easy to under-
stand, Cliff's Notes ex-
pert ynexplain and
summarize The Can-
terbury Tales. Cliff's
v . Notes will improve
your understanding-
and your grades. But
3 don't stop with Chau-
cer. There are more
t [a 125 Cliff's Notes
covering all the fre-
quently assigned plays
t and novels. Look for
! them in the bold black
and yellow-striped
1at your bookseller
cu CANTERBURY TALES

One of the most enjoyable
things about. "The Gospel Accord-
ing to St. Matthew" is the choice
of music. It opens with the "Missa
Luba," a Congolese musical ar-
rangement of the Christian mass,
sung by Les Troubadours du Roi
Baudouin. This fantastic piece is
used at various places throughout
the film. At other points, Odetta's
"Sometimes I Feel Like a Mother-
less Child" and music by Bach,
Prokofiev, and Mozart are skill-
fully employed. The music and the
words of Jesus are woven con-
trapuntally; both words and music
Free to
College
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250 to others
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Final Week

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Remarkably uninhibited and specific in its recording of
the way lovers talk and touch andthink!"
-Richard Schnickel, Life Magazine
"A tender and lusty study of love. 'Dear John' is a tour de
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It is a beautiful film,
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