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October 07, 1966 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-07

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PAGE SEX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1966

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7.1966

Experts Speculate on Soviet Reciprocation
To Cut in Allied Troops in West Germany

Charge U.S. Defoliated
Viet Demilitarized Zone

WASHINGTON OP) -The ex-
perts are uncertain of possible
S o v i e t reciprocation if the
"searching reappraisal" of West-
ern needs for European defense
results, as expected, in a cut in
Anglo-American troops in Ger-
many.

But the officials seem to agreer
on one point: Even if the Soviet,
Union does not reciprocate, the
forces will be reduced if the forth-
coming tripartite review shows
that a credible deterrent can bea
maintained with fewer forces;
without encouraging Soviet probes,

Army Faced with Decisions;
Reserve Backdog Growing

, WASHINGTON (P)-The army
is facing some critical decisions
in the next few weeks, officials
said yesterday because of a grow-
ing backlog of untrained Nation-
al Guardsmen and Reserves.
At the present level of enlist-
ments and training of these Re-
serves and National Guardsmen-
restricted by the active Army
needs for Viet Nam and elsewhere
-the backlog is expected to swell
to more than 150,000 by June.
Top-level Defense Department
officials have long been known to
be considering a cutback in enlist-
ments or a boost in training in an
effort to reduce the growing num-
ber of untrained personnel in the
reserve enlistment program.
Haven From Draft
At the end of fiscal year 1966,
June 30, a total of 133,100 in the
program were still untrained. This
has brought persistently sharp
criticism from Congress that the
program is a haven from the draft
while other men are being drafted
for Viet, Nam.
But thus far no steps to cut off
enlistments or boost training have
been taken and the reserve units
are continuing to add new men as
vacancies occur.
Training programs have cut
down the backlog to an estimated
121,000 as of last month, but
sources said this was due to a
loosening of regular Army train-
ing schedules this spring that en-
abled a few more thousand re-
serves to get training.
No Plans
A National Guard source said
more than 10,000 enlistees were
inducted in July and August of
this fiscal year and "there are no
plans to cut back."
A source also said that more
than 16,000 guardsmen had signed
up In fiscal year 1966 for training
this year. These men were not
included in the backlog total as
of June 30.
Another National Guard offi-
cer estimated that about 5,000
openings show up every month
and he described that rate as "a
pretty good indication of the at-
trition." At that level, the Na-
tional Guard will induct about
60,000 men by the end of the year,
some 30,000 less than in 1966.
McNamara Estimate
Army Reserve induction figures
were not available, but Secretary
of Defense Robert S. McNamara
and others have estimated the at-
trition of those units at about
two per cent monthly-meaning
about 60,000 men would be needed
to keep the 250,000-man Reserve
force at its authorized strength
during this fiscal year.
Officials said in interviews that
the Army plans to train about 85,-
000 Reserve enlistees by next June
-a rate of roughly 7,000 per
month, but still about 3,000 less
than the total number of men now
being inducted monthly into Re-
serve and National Guard units.
Thus, as matters stand now,
Army planners can foresee an in-
crease of about 36,000 "reps"-
as they are called-by next June
to the already burdensome back-
logs.
The recent increases will be ad-
justed, officers said, by smaller
rep training allotments in the
coming months as the Army train-
ing bases strain to meet the heavy

Viet Nam manpower and rotation
needs.
The over-all rate of rep train-
ing is not expected to exceed the
7,000-a-month rate, officials said,
barring a top-level decision.
"These decisions are being made
right now," one high source said,
adding that the Army must meas-
ure the need for increased rep
training against the reduction in
over-all combat readiness that
such increased training would in-
evitably bring.
Combat Divisions
To boost the training of re-
serves, it was explained, active
combat divisions in the United
States must increase their share
of the training load. Some train-
ing is now done in the 1st and 2nd
Armored divisions in Texas and
the 5th Mechanized Infantry Di-
vision in Colorado.
Reserve officials emphasized that
despite all the problems, the 150,-
000-man Selected Reserve force-
the high priority units of the Re-
serves-has no trouble getting its
rep enlistments trained.

of Western determination to de-
dend itself.
The question of what the Soviet
reaction will be has been raised
frequently since President John-
son and West German Chancellor
Ludwig Erhard agreed last month
to have a reappraisal and the Brit-
ish government consented to parti-
cipate.
Soviet Moves
According to one school of
thought no Soviet move should be
expected because Moscow would
be in an awkward position if it
cut its forces in view of Red Chi-
nese accusations that Russia is
"colluding" with the United Sta-
tes against Asian communism.
Other experts are not so sure.
Moscow, they speculate, must have
recognized by now that whatever
it does, it cannot change Peking's
hostility so it might as well con-
tinue cooperation with the United
States to ease tensions, at least in
Europe. There are small signs, in-
cluding the recently announced
resumption of U.S.-Soviet air route
talks, which seem to justify this
view.
If Moscow decides to recipro-
cate in kind, there is a lot that
couldbe done.Soviet forces out-
side the U.S.S.R. border are for-
midable, and the Communist na-
tions of Eastern Europe also main-
tain strong national armies.
Communist Strength
Though it is not a Communist
custom to discuss publicly the
strength of their forces, there are
aparently no secrets in this area,
and Anglo-American military ex-

perts claim to know the number
of troops on the other side of the
Iron Curtain.
Out of the 140 Soviet divisions,
totaling two million men, 26 are
outside the Soviet Union's western
borders. In addition, 75 divisions
are in European U.S.S.R. relatively
close to the western Soviet border.
All 26 divisions in East Ger-
many, Hungary and Poland are
"combat ready," and so is the
majority of the 75 divisions in the
European U.S.S.R., the experts
say.
Should the West cut troops in
Germany, it can be assumed that
there will be a growing pressure
on Moscow to withdraw at least
partly from Poland and Hungary,
some experts believe.

TOKYO (P-North Viet Nam
charged yesterday that the United
States sprayed tons of toxic chem-
icals on the western sector of the
Demilitarized Zone on Sept. 29
for the second time within 10 days.
In a message sent to the Inter-
national Control Commission, the
Communists said a number of ci-
vilians in three villages in the
northern part of the zone were af-
fected and the vegetation and
crops in the area destroyed.
The U.S. Command in Saigon
has acknowledged limited defolia-
tion of areas south of the DemI~i-
tarized Zone in efforts to deprive
North Vietnamese infiltrators of
natural cover.
The message said that the Unit-
ed States has been continuously
conducting air and ground opera-

tions in the 45-mile-!ong, six-
mile-wide strip set up oy th 1954
Geneva agreements as a military-
free buffer zone between North
and South Viet Nam.
During the period of Oct. 2-5,
the Communists charged, U.S. B52
bombers "bombed in many waves,
the Demilitarized Zone and the
neighboring areas which belong to
Vinh Linh region and to the west-
ern part of the Gio Linh distiict,
Quang Tri Province."
Could you tell me, please:
what are Floggs?"
"Assuredly Floggs are like led-
erhosen only with legs and not
suspenders. They're bermudas
except for being leather. Floggs
act like regular pants only.
umm . .. they have two zippers
In front and a . . . uh ... knife
pocket. Yes, and they have
comfort, with being unique and
others too numerous to men-
tion. Yes."
A public service intimation
from
foggs
by J/P
KEN DRESNER provides
further answers.
P-23 Lawyer's Club

Subscribe To
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

No supperclub this Sunday, October 9
But service resumes Sunday, October 16, 5:30 P.M.
KOSHER CORNED BEEF
1429 Hill

14

DOWNTOWN HONDA

rI

.

" .
ty

Big or Small
We Have Them All

-.

f State St.
Division St.

FIA

Academic Affairs Committee
Presents
LAW SCHOOL DISCUSSION
Learn about the University
of Michigan Law School
from an admissions officer
of the school.
Monday, Oct. 10-4:15 P.M.
UGLI Multipurpose Room

= Stii Ave.
3: 4t6 Am.
ti Main st.
WENK Sales & Service, Inc.
310 East Washington 665-8637 Sales, Service, Parts Accessories
Service entrance on 5th Ave.

University of Michigan Bands
Presents
The Third Annual
BAND-O=RAMA
Featuring the Symphony,
Concert, Marching, and Jazz Bands
Friday, October 14-8:30 P.M.
AT HILL AUDITORIUM
TICKETS ON SALE NOW AT THE
HILL AUDITIRIUM BOX OFFICE
Prices :-$1 .00 and $1.50
All seats reserved

ill

----

Please

don't

Zlupf sprite.
It makes
plenty of noise
all by it'self.
Sprite, you recall, is
the soft drink that's
so tart and tingling,
we Just couldn't keep
it quiet.
Flip its lid and it
really flips.
Bubbling, fizzing,
gurgling, hissing and
carrying on all over
the place.
An almost exces-
sively lively drink.
Hence, to zlupf is

4

(I

F

{

RECEIVING A DEGREE?
IN DECEMBER? IN MAY?

IN AUGUST?

4

Your Picture Belongs in Your Yearbook

R 11

N

BUT IT WILL GETTHERE ONLY IF YOU
MAKE A SITTING APPOJNTMENT NOW!
Your picture must be taken by our photographers
to appear in the MICHIGANENSIAN.
' Our photographers will take pictures only
through this week.
Make Your Appointment NOW at the
MICHIGANENSIAN Sales Booth on the Diag
$2.00 Sitting Fee Payable
As You Make Your Appointment.

3
A

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