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October 07, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FR AY.OCTOR- . 7 * Lfuu

PAETOTEMCIGNDIY1RTlV l'nui' o

A MIA"l-ni, vliaVDtiL 1, luou

FILMS
Director Tempers Tradition
In Lean's Expectations'

ICC Lacks A:

By JOHN HALBROOK
You've seen the book, now read
the movie. It is that ultimately;
seeable Dickens and that ultimate-
ly readable David Lean combina-
tion, "Great Expectations." If you
have any, by all means, don't go.
It is not the Dickens of "Oliver
Twist" or the David Lean of
"Bridge on the River Kwai." One
does not witness the magnificent
scenery of "Dr Zhivago" or "Law-
rence of Arabia" but you do see
the genesis of an epic genius.
Besides the fine performances
of the young Pip (Anthony Wa-
ger), the young Estella (Jean
Simmons) and the superb Mr.
Pocket (Alec Guiness younger
than you've ever seen him before),
the film is worth the direction and
photography of David Lean in
three scenes: Pip walking slowly
towards the deserted graveyard
where his parents are buried,
glancing up timidly at the nooses
hanging lifelessly beside the road,
the dramatic young man tearing
off the dead tablecloth to save the
life of the- burning woman, the
mental breakdown of cur hero in
the streets of London with the
white candle lights flickering
across the screen. This is cinema,
this is a director in the making.
We must accept Dickens or per-
haps ignore him to appreciate
this film. It is the- story of Pip,
a young man going through the
motions of growing up in a world,
incredible to us today but all too
believable, in 19th century Eng-
land. A world where death is a
constant and real threat on an in-
dividual level. We see this

throughout the film-the nooses,
the gallows, the death masks and
finally its apotheosis-Miss Haver-
sham, who is life-in-death, the un-
married bride whose life stopped
at twenty of nine when she knew
that her groom would never come
for her.
It is a world, nevertheless, of
strong love, which, Dickens in-
sists, Will save us all in the end.
We see this in the old convict
who remembers one act of kind-
ness and repays it for the rest of
his life. There is Old Joe the
blacksmith, who is always good
and always kind and always a
ready mouth for Dickens' philo:o-
phy of life. Then there is Estella,
the woman of Pip's life, raised to
wreck revenge on all mankind,
If the characters in his life
may be called one-dimensional,
and they certainly may, one can-
not accuse them of being unin-
teresting. One glimpse of the
scar-faced villain or the wealthy
business-busy Mr. Jaggers, and
one is aware that these dark and
sometimes sinister creatures im-
print an image that may never be
forgotten.
"Great Expectations" is not, on
the whole, greatly disappointing.
It is a fine film for 1946 and un-
doubtedly one of the greats in the
literary, paragraph by paragraph,
tradition. But still, it is Dickens
and that means mysterious, adven-
turous plots; dramatic character
clashes and, of course, the senti-
mental "happily ever after" end-
ing. If you are looking for mean-
ing try the talking cow scene;
it must be there somewhere,
musn't it?

An AP News Analysis
SAIGON (1P) - A three-nation
body called the International Con-j
trol Commission was created 10r
years ago to keep the peace in
Viet Nam. All it has been able to
do is to keep a box score of thet
ever-increasing war.
Inspection teams from the com-
mision have been trying for weeks
to visit the northern and southern
halves of the six-mile-wide De-
militarized Zone.
U.S. and Vietnamese war planes
ceased bombing one part of the
zone Sept. 27 so the teams could
move in. North Viet Nam has
steadfastly refused to let the teams
inspect its side of the zone.
Even if the teams do get to in-
spect both sides of the zone, and
even if they find evidence of the
massive Communist troop buildup
that South Viet Nam alleges, there
is little they can do about it ex-
cept file a report.
Violations
A dozen reports in the past con-
firming violations of the Demili-
tarized Zone and other areas by
both North and South Viet Nam
have had no noticeable effect on
slowing the war.
The commission was envisaged
originally as the international po-
lice force for Viet Nam, composed
of representatives from Poland,
India and Canada. Its power hasI
worn away over the years.
North Viet Nam does not per-
mit ICC observers outside the cap-
ital, Hanoi. In South Viet Nam,
teams are located at Gio Linh just
south of the DMZ, and at Qui
Nhen, Nha Trang, Cap St. Jacques
and Saigon.
The commission's role, deter-
mined by the 1954 Geneva agree-
ment on ending the Indochinat
war, was to see that regulations
controlling the importation of
armaments and the stationing of
armed forces in both countries
were observed.
Control and Inspect
To do this, four-man teams
comprising one Indian, one Pole,
one Canadian and an interpreter
were formed. Their, job was to
control, inspect and investigate
activities of both North and South
Viet Nam,
The ICC came up with plenty of
facts but cold war politics soon
interfered in the findings.
Poland abstained from a report
filed by India and Canada in 1962
that North Viet Nam was violat-
ing the Geneva agreement by
sending men and arms into the
South.

r
w
m
t
f
u
t
m
c
a
T
IS

uthority; Keeps Box Score, Not Peace
Canada abstained from a 1965 Team members also visit base 'few trips have been made to the
eport that said the United States installations such as Tan Son east of Route 1 since the bombing
was violating the Geneva agree- Nhut Airport at Saigon to count ceased there, reliable reports say.
ments by bombing North Viet Nam. aircraft taking off and landing. The findings will be forwardedj
Main Problems Both North and South govern- to the co-chairmen of the Geneva
One of the main problems is ments exhibit captured enemy agreements, Britain and the Soviet!
hat the commission is a police equipment for commission mem- Union, for perusal.
orce with no authority to police. bers. The Saigon government often Suggestions that the ICC be
Unlike the peacekeeping forces in presents North Vietnamese pris- beefed up so that more extensive
he Middle East, it can do nothing oners for interrogation doomed to fail. The Genevapagree-
more than issue reports. Gio Linh ments specifically limit the com-
The four-man teams ride in In the Demilitarized Zone area, mission's role.
cars and trucks painted white with the nearest ICC team is based at It would take another confer-
black "ICC" stenciled on them. Gio Linh, five miles from thl ence to expand that role, and the
They have been subject to Viet Ben Hai River bridge which links Communists have given no indica-
Cong sniper fire and mines in the north and south. Teams have tion they wish to return to the
South Viet Nam. been driving to the bridge, and a conference table.

"CHINA-THE BACKGROUND OF
THE 'PROLETARIAN CULTURAL
REVOLUTION'
DR. ALEXANDER ECKSTEIN
Dept. of Economics
at the
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Washtenow Ave.
(Continuing the series on Notion Building in Asia.
Following programs focus on Indonesia and Japan)
EVERYONE WELCOME

SUNDAY, October 9

7:30 P.M.

rI
a*
Il

P r e s e n tis
CARY GRANT LESLIE CARON
TREVOR HOWARD
in
FATHER GOOSE
TECHNICOLOR
(Academy Award-Best Screen Play
of the Year)
Friday and Saturday, Oct. 7 & 8
Aud. A, Angell Hall 50c
7 and 9:15 P.M.
.D. required Program information: 663-5832

'I
1

l

Lead the
Great Men
of the World.
Around the U of M Campus
STUDENT
SESQUICENTENN IAL
ESCORT
SERVICE
Sign up for interviews
9-5 daily -
Oct. 10-l 7
in the Student Offices

Ac Csampus

I

FRIDAY, OCT.7
7 and 9 p.m. -The Cinema
Guild will present Dovzhenko's
"Earth" in the Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The APA Repertory
Theatre Company will present
"Three Mysteries W i t h Two
Clowns" in the Lydia. Mendels-
sohn Theatre..
7 and 9 p.ln.-Cinema II will
Grant in Auditorium A of Angell
"The Decline and Fall of
The Entire World As Seen
Through The Eyes of
COLE PORTER Revisited"
FRIDAY, October 7
8:00 P.M.
Pease Auditorium
Eastern Michigan, University
"A contagiously joyous evening
of theatre .. ." Saturday Review
Tickets: Presafe, McKenny Union,
Eastern Michigan University,
Performance, Pease.

present "Father Goose" with Cary
Hall.
SATURDAY, OCT. 8
7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema
Guild will present David Lean's
"Great Expectations" in the Ar-
chitecture Aud.
8 p.m. -- The APA Repertory
Theatre Company will present
"T h r e e Mysteries with Two
Clowns" in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The University Musi-
cal Society Concert will feature
the Chicago Symphony Orchestra
conducted by Jean Martinon in
Hill Aud.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema II will
present "Father Goose" with Cary
Grant in Auditorium A of Angell
Hall.

it

Read and Use
daily Classifieds

",'

ArK
Coffee House
1421 H ill St.
featuring THE
RHYTHM
and BLUES
BAND;
AFTERMATH
8:30-1,1:30
FRIDAY, OCT. 7
$1.00 cover includes
all you can eat
Phone 482-2056
EtNa~ CARPIKTER RUJW
OPEN 6:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
ORANLEY COMPANY ' rwe
CARY GRANT
SAMANThA EGGAR
JIM HUTTON A
Snown at 7:10-11:00 DN"
ACOLUMBLUYCTURES MRAS(
Shown 9:25
*..* -,a..,
at only
BALLAD1
in COLUMBIA COLO

y

DIAL
8-6416

5

1 4@M@

..- =--

"Altogether it is a stunning picture, a compelling
picture! A frank and uninhibited exposition of the
on-rush of physical desire. One after another scene
expands upon the brash techniques of courtship and
the clamorous fulfillment of desire!"ostjiey cowther, N.Y. Tames
N
Tonight at
7 and 9 p.m.

HELD OVER
3RD WEEK

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f
i
i
I
4
(!
i
E
7
S
S
i

1 1
1 I
r 1
1 I
1 1
1 I
! 1
1 I
OCT. 6, 7
1 I
I 1
EARTH
I (dir. Dovzhenko-19301
Russian, silent. Dvozhenko is considered
one of the giants of Cinematic Art and
"Earth" is his greatest film. A must for
any serious student of the film.
I 1
SHORTS: "A PROPOS DE NICE" (Jean
I Vigo), "BALLET MECHANIQUE" (Le-
aI
U ger), "LE CHIEN ANDALOU" (Bunnel/-
* Dali) I
U I
I U
U 1
I 1.
Thurs. & Fri. 7:00 & 9:00
iI
Ia
I I
1 I
e I
Architecture Aud.
Still Only 50c
mmmmmmmmm m~ mmmm m~in~~ mm1

I

V.

-I

(Delayed by Holdover)
"MORGAN"
(But Still Coming)

_-
;

h .

2-6264
DIAL
ENDS TONIGHT
James Garner-Jean Simmons

TOMORROW!

14

"A crescendo of
excitement and
involvement!
I recommend it!"
-Crowther, N.Y. Times
"Direct, provocative
and eloquent,
noble and touching...
the film is as violent
as history itself l" 4 DA
.-Time Magazine -

Also .

"LEAPING DANDIGS"
IN COLOR

Aicr-.
I * ' y .Y% ;I %S - 'A

YS ONLY

p

I

I

M? A I PrY-n nn w MT! CorCDi 110A } WO-IMEMbib.- MOW -A

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