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September 10, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-10

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1966

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10. 1966

I

Canterbury House Opens Second Season
With Guitarist and Singer Michael Cooney

Enthusiasm Sparks
Porch Player Drama

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By ANN L. MARCHIO
For some people Canterbury
House is a place to buy coffee and
find excellent entertainment. And
it is, partly.
Last night the coffee house went
into its second 'year, and students
had to be turned away because of
the limited capacity. But the new
year will see some changes in
operation. Now the coffee house is
open all three nights of the week-
end. It will also keep the same
coffee and donut hours during the
week from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. A
series of noon movies will also be
provided; and one weekend will be
filled with three nights of double

features, all starring' Humphrey talk about Michael Cooney. One under the heading 'coffee house.'
Bogart. listens to him. He's indescribably We intend to have a much wider
Canterbury House is not only delicious, range than that. With the addi-
on the move, it has moved to Would you believe Michael has tion of a seminarian for an intern
Maynard Street across from the seen 47 states, sang at umpteen year and the help of students who
Arcade. The new room is beauti- coffee houses, and has an antique are interested and willing, we will
fully painted in an intimate black bakery truck with "I Love You" be able to stay open much of the
and white and even has an au- written on top? time. For another, we expect to
thentic alley entrance. The light- And he likes people so much be avaliable for counseling - the
ing is out of sight and in techni- that they can't help responding. ese an manage with profes-
color ! And Canterbury House likes o -h

This weekend, Michael Cooney
sauntered in from his last blow-
out in Cambridge. Wearing a
genuine smile and a comfortable
outfit, he proceeded to amaze the
audience with his versatility, vir-
tuosity, personality, and original-
ity. In other words, one doesn't

ple so much that they can't help
responding. And this is where the
coffee house stops being just a
coffee house and takes on the
aura of a warm home.
Rev. Daniel Burke, Chaplain
says, "It is unfortunate, really,
to conclude what we are doing

Russian Leaders Scrutinize
Soviet Educational System

"And we plan to gather all of
this up in worship which, because
of our circumstances, will have
the accent on instructive experi-
mentation."
Regarding the experimention,
the Canterbury House hopes to
provide some interesting masses
later on in the year, including a
possible jazz, folk and rock 'n'
roll mass. The liturgy will remain
the same.
Also planned for this year is a
"Come All Ye," where students
may read their poetry, sing or
whatever. This will also serve as
an audition.

An unusual production took
place last night in the Arena
Theatre. The drama was not the
central point of attention, how-
ever. It was the idea behind the
production, an idea that found
its incipiency between two stu-
dents of the theatre who shared
a beautiful passage. And the love
for the passage grew into a love
for the play in its entirety. The
enthusiasm spiraled as others be-
came interested. Together they
forged their way into production.
First of all, they called them-
selves the Porch Players, stem-
ming from location of their first
few meetings. From this volunteer
spirit emerged a bond of talent
and friendship and love for the
theatre.
The seed of their creativity jus-
tified the whole effort. Their
cause, "The Cave Dwellers" by
William Saroyan, is an artful play
without being absurd. Saroyan
makes several strong points, strong
but not harsh. This is the beauty
of the play. Despite the crude
dwelling of the displaced humans

and a bear, and despite their
anxiety at being "nothing involv-
ed in nothing," they remain sensi-
tive people, living in the midst of
fear and hate. Each has sought
the shelter of the stage to buffer
himself against the retaliation that
"if I've lost my art, what good is
my shoe." But they do realize it,
and in the end they accept it.'
Yet it is the actors and not the
act that must receive the applause.
The duke was a champ. And the
rest of the court deserved royalty.
The play makes its second ap-
pearance this evening at 8 p.m.
Perhaps this time they will have
time for a well-deserved encore.
Phone 482-2056
A 1
INEASTMANCOLOR®,*,
Shown at 7:40-11:45
ALSO ...
Shown at 10:00 OnlyJ
I
METRO IJ~DThE
COLOR9_
PLUS: "They Fly Through the Air"
2 Color cartoons

CINEMA II
presents
A RAISIN
IN THE SUN
Sidney Poitier's finest film!
By far his most dramatic,
versa tile performance.
SATURDAY AND SUNDAY
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL

Sept. 9, 10, 11
7 and 9:15 P.M.

50C
532

Adm iss

SHORT: Jules Feiffer's 'Munro"
(Academy Award, 1961)

i$

I.D. Required

Program Information: 663.5

MOSCOW (P)-The Soviet lead-1
ership expressed concern todayi
about the quality of higher edu-i
cation in this country and ordered
steps to improve it.l
The Soviet press published a re-1
port on decisions enacted by the
ruling Central Committee of the1
Soviet Communist Party and -the
Cabinet, speaking of "serious
shortcomings" in the training of
specialists in science and other
fields at Soviet institutions of;
higher education.
The shortcomings were not1
spelled out. But the importance of
the problems was underscored by
the fact that the leading party
and government organs took steps1
to contend with them.
One'of the key steps. in the view
of diplomatic sources here, was an
order designed to tie university
research more closely to the day-
to-day needs of Soviet industry

by encouraging university officials
to enter into contracts with indus-
try on practical research projects.
The university would be al-
lowed to keep 75 per cent of the
profits from the contract and in-
vest the proceeds in university
programs.
Only sketchy details were given
on the other measures ordered, but
they included these general moves:
-Increased investment in re-
search and other facilities. Each
Soviet government ministry was
authorized to invest the equiva-
lent of $2,775,000 a year in uni-
versity training programs for spe-
cialists in its field-for example
the Ministry of Health for medical
specialists.
-Improved training for teach-
ers and higher requirements for
teaching posts.'
-Increased teaching staff.
-Prizes and other incentives for

outstanding student work.
-Increased control by the Min-
istry of Higher and Specialized
Secondary Education on the quali-
ty of training programs at insti-
tutes.
-More leeway for university
rectors to decide where research
funds should be invested and the
right for some to start university
publishing houses.
The report said "the most im-
portant task" is "to improve the-
quality of the training of special-
ists." At the same time. steps were
taken to improve ideological train-
ing in Marxism-Leninism and to
increase party control over this
field of education.
These two points underlined a
difficult problem for Soviet au-
thorities.
Many of the country's brighter
students are choosing work in
scientific fields where there is less
stress on ideological training and
where they are given more free-
dom to pursue their own interests.
Scientific training is given by
experts whose field of knowledge
extends beyond the scope of party
workers. Authorities have been
unhappy about the lack of ideo-
logical training given scientific
specialists.
Fewer top students are being at-
tracted by work in the social sci-
ences, which stresses ideological
training and prepares students 'for
party and government posts. Fri-
day's report said special institutes
would be set up at four major
Soviet universities to raise quali-
fications of teachers in the social
sciences

' ..___________ ____________'. .. .w . .s

THE BLACKS
Genet's provocative and frightening play . pro-
duced by the Department of Comparative Literature
with an all-Negro cast.
This Thursday-Saturday, Sept. 8, 9, 10
Trueblood Auditorium
8:00 P.M.
Tickets at box office ($1 .50, 1.00, .50)
Open 10-5 and till curtain on performance days

Subscribe'To

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Call11764-0558

I

I

U

Da ily Classified

Are

great

I

Cinema quild een t4

Across Campus

s~tow

..

DIAL 8-6416
Continuous Today from 1 P.M.

rCAMUS THEAT

e rn. i r rv ' .. +.r i

SATURDAY, SEPT.10.
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
presents Tom Courtney and Mi-
chael Redgrave in "The Loneli
ness of the Long Distance Run-
ner," a bitter, biting study of the
physical and emotional confusion
of adolescence, :in the Architec-
ture Aud.
7 and 9:15 p m.-Cinema II pre-
sents Sidney Poitier in " A Rai-
sin in the Sun" in Aud. A, Angell
Hall..
8 p.m.=The University Player's
is sponsoring the Porch Players
in William Saroyan's "The Cave
Dwellers" in the Arena Theater
on the first floor of the Frieze
Bldg.
8 p.m. - The Department of
Comparative Literature presents
"The Blacks," Genet's provocative
and frightening play, in the True
blood Aud. in the Frieze Bldg.
8 p.m.-Detroit Tang Soo Do
Association and U-M and Ann Ar-
bor Tang Soo Do Club present a
free- karate demonstration by 20
men and women in the Ann Arbor
High School gym.
8 p.m.-"The Driving4Wheels,"
blues band, is appearing in concert
at the Ark Coffee House, 1421 Hill
St.

8:30 p.m. -
presents folk
Cooney at 330

Canterbury House
singer Michael
Maynard St.

"Everything about 'A Shop on Main Street' is just right.
What more can be said in praise!!"-Michigan Daily

i
I
-R

SUNDAY, SEPT. 11
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild
presents Tom Courtney and Mi-
chael Redgrave in "The Loneli-
ness of the Long Distance Run-
ner."
7 and 9:15 p.m.-Cinema II pre-
dents Sidney Poitier in "A Rai-
sin in the Sun" in Aud. A, Angell
ball.

ACADEMY
AWARD
WINNER
"BEST FOREIGN
FILM OF THE
YEARIN"
"Masterful! One of the great films
of our time!"-Cue Magazine
"Marvelous to behold! One of the
important films of this year!"
-N.Y. Daily News

11

DIAL
2-6264

I !
i

ENDS TONIGHT

A0a :
AT 1:00-4:30-8:05

11

Iuol ,
AT 3:00-6:25-9:55

9($wor~4 ' I
Z4tV
,a~atE /
yore odlaa

TOMORROW ..
THIS IS THE BIG DRAMA BEHIND
THE BIG DREAM OF HOLLYWOOD'S,
GREAT" GOLD RUSH"!
<.4
THE OSCAR
8ffPHE 8'(D I EI( SMMER " MLLIOtNBERLE ELEANO~RPARKER JOP 01IEN
JIRISIJ HN 'I9N( ENNEU *' and [DIE ADAMS-and ERES RGE I-ASEWSOtL
RUSSELL ROUSE vCLARENCE GREENE.- RICHARD SALE JOSEPH E LEVINE CLARENCE GREENE
in COLOR

Only one picture has been made this year that is
absolutely off its rocker and positively out of its
mind-and we've got the nuts to prove it-

I

-- - -What a way
to lose./
your
m arbles. f -:. ..y

yLy : .. Qr

a

Sean Connery
JoanneWoodward
Jean Seberg
"AJ Fine EMAdne "
A JEROME HELLMAN Produdton

4

L4

Shows at
1, 3, 5,
7 & 4:05 P.M.

DIAL
5-6290

SUBSCRIBE TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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