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September 09, 1966 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1966

PAGE EIGHT THE MICNIbAN EIlEEN FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9,1966

ATTENTION
STUDENTS
All changes of address or telephone
numbers (this includes numbers
not recorded on registration forms)
must be reported at 2226 Student
Activities Bldg. by September 13,
if it is to appear in the
'66-67 STUDENT DIRECTORY.

Bruhn Due for SecondNightmare THE JUNIOR CIRCUIT
By JOEL BLOCK Fritz; but only Fritz has nailed a little color blind and tossed one H S., Neenah, Wis to a staff (e-
down a starting job. out of ten passes into the eager pleted by promotions and the
Jankowski led the almost non- hands of a defensive back. It death of 'assistant Clark Van Gal- . .
C/ lt T17! --- -- ,..L---. A1_det fassatCakVnG l i*j

SC U G jaexistent Badger rushing attack
THE BIG TEN last year with 271 net yards from
scrimmage. (Michigan's Ward had
more than twice as much.) With
If you were a Wisconsin football such unimpressive statistics it's
football coach and had your best no wonder that Head Coach Milt

seems
please
now h

coach Bruhn wasnt too
d with this performance and der.
e has junior John Boya.iian

tontcti-ing Interests

Somebody's Hoping

runner, passer, and scorer of 1965
returning to play this fall you'd
feel confident and content and
all those good things Big Ten
coaches rarely feel, RIGHT?
WRONG! Because your best run-
ner, passer, and scorer are rem-
nants of the worst Wisconsin team
of the decade.
The Triumphant Trio is com-

Biuhn has switched to 6-2, 227-
pound sophomore Wayne Todd in
the fall scrimmages.
Aerial Exchange
If you talk to Burt, he'll tell
you that he had the tenth best
passing percentage in the nation
last year. Very impressive. And so
was the number of aerials the
other guys caught.

trying his luck with the first Then there's that catastrophic"rm eLrs ue r UI ingf e
string backfield. schedule Wisconsin has to furrow
The only really solid player of through this year. First there's By GRAYLE HOWLETT
this returning threesome is tight the Iowa State Cyclones with top
end Fritz His scoring total of 24 Big Eight quarterback Tim Van Pete Rozelle, wearing the perennial smile that makes even Hubert
points was tops for Wisconsin Galder and nine other offensive Humphrey jealous, looked conspicuous without a ten-gallon hat as he
scorers last year and is the most starters returning to improve their huddled between Tex Schramm, general manager of the NFL Dallas
number of points ever scored by 5-4-1 record of last year. Then Cowboys, and Lamar Hunt, money man behind the AFL Kansas City
a Wisconsin sophomore. they face John McKay's Trojans Chiefs.
Star-Searching of Sotuhern California who should
be formidable opposition even The pro football orator of never a discouraging word was about
It doesn't seem like Bruhn is
going to find any hope in his seven though All-American Mike Gar- to annouce that he would be the Commissioner of the newly merged
returning linemen of last year's ret is gone. To climax their non- AFL-NFL, a match which only could have been made in heaven
trampled squad. As early as the conference gaunhtlet. Bruhn's boys (Texas, to be sure).
spring drills Milt switched Tony will host the Nebraska Cornhusk- The "ooh" and "ah" story of the summer was greeted with the
Loukas, who played center every e onal championship by Alabama general recation that 'the NFL and AFL feud is dead, long live the
game last year, to right tackle to he Oramnge By ANFL-AFL." Now both leagues could concentrate on the finer points
shore up one of the bulging holes mn OrangeB l.of the game such as passing, blocking, and tackling and do away
... t~n ?nrln~e.+li 117e1 , 14-;i.ti ..ryouve got- a^ f_-

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DON'T
CRAM!!

prised of senior fullback Tom Five out of every ten times he
Jankowski, junior quarterback threw the ball, Chuck hit a red
Chuck Burt, and senior end Bill and white jersey; but when he got
Start the Year
Out Right!!

in the Badger ine.
Have enough problems yet,
Coach? How about four rookie
coaches to guide the rookies on
the field? Bruhn has added coach-
es Mike McGee (Duke), Roger
French (Memphis State), Les
Ritcherson (Moore H.S., Waco,
Texas), and Harland Carl (Neenah

problems to cope with. But there
are a few people in Madison who
are optimistic. They just built a
new upper deck into Camp Ran-
dall Stadium. providing seats for
1,310 more enthusiastic fans. Or

1.310
coaches.

more Sunday morning

STEAK AND SHAKE
1313 South University
CHAR-BROILED SIRLOIN STEAK
Potato Salad, Bread & Butter ...........$1.50
SPAGHETTI & MEAT SAUCE
Salad, Bread & Butter.............$1.30

s

TI

OPEN: Mon., Wed. and Thurs., 4 P.M. to 2 A.M.
OPEN: Fri., Sat., Sun., Noon to 3 A.M. (Closed Tuesday)
DeLONG'S PIT BARBECUE.
314 DETROIT ST., ANN ARBOR, MICH.
CARRY.OUT ORDERS ONLY-PHONE 665-2266
FREE DELIVERY
BARBECUE CHICKEN AND RIBS
FRIED CHICKEN SHRIMP AND FISH

DINE OUT
STUDENTS
WELCOME BACK!!
Now's your chance to get the
THE "GREATEST PIZZA"
at South U. Restaurant
For your convenience-open 24 hours daily
. Carry-out All Week . 662-4170
Breakfasts-Lunches-Dinners
WELCOME!
TO
FIRESIDE LOUNGE

77HONDA

Chinese and American Restaurant'

I

DOWNTOWN HONDA
310 E. Washington
Returning Students Note!
WE MOVED IN MAY

I

3140 Packard

NO 8-7488

311 South Main

662-4240

OPEN DAILY-]II A.M. to 1:30 A.M.
OPEN SUNDAY-11 A.M. to 10 P.M.
Closed Mondays,
get the BEST food in town
" PEA PODS . HONG SHU
" CHINESE BEAN CAKES 0 CURRY POWDER
Order for banquets, parties or any other combinations

Sour
CusovtI &sEigne& oaod o'i u
Oi%.groupsof 20 to 22 0
19REE ALL CRPTEDA ND
UO.UTIFWLLt DE(OROTEV 00q$.,*

Friday Nite Seafood Smorgasbord
FOOD and LIQUOR SERVED
OPEN 0 Mon.-Thurs.-1 1 :30-8 P.M.
s Fri. & Sat.-1 1 :30-9 P.M.
0 Closed Sunday

I

with the current practice of rookies wearing their money belts as
hip pads.
But the war is far from over, only the battleground has
shifted.
Enter baseball (Yes, Commissioner Eckert, there is a sport
called baseball), and professional football has a non-conference
opponent.
j Up to now, professional football and major league baseball have
enjoyed a relatively harmonious relationship save for a few malcon-
tents who insist that one of the two has to be the "national past-
time." Those rallying behind "Win one for the Gipper" point out the
upsurge in attendance, the fact that every kid is playing football,
and that the annual title game draws a television audience second,
only to the national conventions. While the drum-beaters shout "Slide,
Kelley, slide," reverting to the irrevocable facts of increased attend-
ance, that more kids than ever are swinging bats, and that the World
Series draws a television audience second only to the national con-
ventions.
The argument is merely academic, and both sides are actually
right. It used to be that at the first bee sting of spring everyone
naturally thought of peanuts and popcorn,_and Sandy Koufax's
hummer. And when you switched from sipping lemonade to apple
cider, "rah, rahs" immediately filled the air along with Frank Gif-
ford's description of a flag cut.
But in this day and age when "the approach of the football
season" is a misnomer because it never really ends (the Pro
Bowl, the Coaches All-American game, the All-Star game, et al),
the average fan is being asked more and more to make a choice
and it is primarily for this reason that baseball and football are
negotiating on a collision course.
The NFL and AFL by the year 1970 will have expanded to 28
teams and will play an interlocking schedule. Obviously the present
schedule of 14 games will have to be lengthened and the preliminary
indication is a 16-game slate, conceivably more. Also consider that
with the merger of the two leagues, certain rivalries will be intensi-
fied.
The past mythical game between the New York Jets and the
New York Giants is now a reality. Those staticticians who argued
in the past that the Oakland Raiders were better than their cohorts
across the Bay, the San Francisco 49'ers, can now point to the score.
To schedule all these rivalries would over strain the before mentioned
16-game season, so look for more exhibition games instead of the
proposed cut.
The question now becomes when can all these games be
fitted into an already tight season. The answer is simple: they
can't. Still this poses no problem because the football leagues can
plan on opening camp a few weeks earlier, say in the middle of
June as opposed to the usual mid-July target date.
If you still don't smell the fire, let me point out that in Cleve-
land there is an old adage probably uttered by Bill Veeck himself,
that, "if the Indians are not a pennant contender by the time the
Browns open camp, you can forget your million attendance." In
Baltimore it's a lot easier: "You can forget your attendance as soon
as Johnny Unitas uncorks his first spiral."
If that's not a clear enough trail, consider that the start of the
pro football season will have to be moved up to the beginning of
September when the baseball season still has a good month to run.
Add it all together and you have competition where you didn't have
it before-off the field. Both sports will be fighting for newspaper
space, television coverage, and the fan's buck.
Still, you're probably saying that somehow some important
ingredient is missing that would make a football-baseball war
complete. You're right: it's money, that stuff which the AFL in-
vented and produced in large quantities But money's there when
you consider that most of the stadiums where the pro football
teams play are also the baseball parks and baseball gets priority.
There isthe proverbial powder keg.
It used to be that the pro football leagues would schedule them-
selves around the baseball schedule partly out of fear of competition
but mainly because the parks were unavailable. Two years ago Art
Modell, the owner of the Browns, wanted to hold his annual scrim-
mage in the vast caverns of Cleveland Municipal Stadium instead
of the more modest and confining Hiram College field, where the
Browns train. Gabe Paul, president and general manager of the
Indians, quickly put a halt to Modell's plans and that was that.
Score one for baseball.
But when you consider that an expanded schedule plus a 28-
team league will mean more games seeking a place to play, then pro
football might try to live without baseball instead of with it.
With these two heavyweight opponents ready to go and a
guaranteed record gate assured, you have a fight that no promoter
would turn down. Unfortunately, only the fan loses.
ALL CAMPUS BOWLING LEAGUE
Forming Now
OPENINGS for Individuals and Teams

3

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I

iV
L .,

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BAR-open 'til 2 nightly

I

Our Most Popular
British Import

. _-___ ,

.4

*VELCOME TO
Delicatessen Restaurant
Between University Hospital and
St. Joseph Hospital-I 030 E. Ann
Breakfast-Lunch-Dinner

WEDD6, DINNE.RS, METrN&S . .
five us a call..

tmeki

'il'.
,_

For a Change Try Our
* HOT PASTRAMI on ONION ROLL
9 HOT CORN BEEF on ONION ROLL
* 3 Decker Pastrami, Corn Beef,
Swiss Cheese, Turkey, Lettuce &
Hours: Daily 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. C
Closed Mondays T
* TRAY SERVICE for Parties6

Tomato
ALL FOR
AKE-OUT
662-6422

.3250 WA$gTf1Aw 66- -' 5f

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(I%

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SEE GEORGE-
Michigan Union Bowling Lanes
7 p.m.-Midnight

ti r Nothing pleases us more than the way
our customers snap up every new ship-
ment of these golf jackets. It just goes to
prove that nothing excels Baracuta in design and
authentic British tailoring. It has the original button-
up adjustable knit-lined collar, an action-free, venti-
lated yoke back, trim zip front and knitted cuffs and
waistband. Water-repellent, combed cotton poplin
lined with red rayon plaid. For the links, the campus,
casual and snorts wear. Baracuta has no peer. Sizes

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Detroit Tang Soo Do Association, U-M
and Ann Arbor Tang Soo Do Club

present
FREE

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v A n A TV nrAIAMCITD A TIAM

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