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September 04, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-04

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PAGE TO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

9UN DAY. SEPTE ER 4. 1986

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY gIINDAY. SF rF1wuFn~& 1 aas

UL i- -- - ,Y.-170

rv

I

Republicans To Use High Interest Rates as Major

plopp"

pwpqr-qmw. I

Campaign Issue; Democrats To Rely on

Prosperity

mwcrn w
er ect~c2, "t moderrn tooling"
DIAL 5-6290
2nd Hit Week
Shows at 1:00-3:40-6:10-8 45

WASHINGTON (P) - Republi-
cans have zeroed in on high in-
terest rates as a top campaign
issue this fall but whether tight
money can be turned into GOP
votes still is an open question.
Democrats plan to rely on the
prosperity theme struck by Presi-
dent Johnson in recent speeches to
combat criticism of high interest
rates but some party members
think the GOP has latched onto a
good talking point.
"If we lose 50 or 60 House seats
in November," one disgruntled
Across
Campus
SUNDAY
6 p.m.-Young Friends (Quak-
ers), first meeting/supper, Friends
Center, 1420 Hill, no reservation
necessary.
8 p.m., The award-winning "Da-
vid and Lisa" will be shown at
the Newman Center, 331 Thomp-
son St. Admission is 50 cents.

Democrat said, "you can blame
the economic situation."
No Problem
Other Democrats see no particu-
lar problem, however, at least on
the surface.
"The real trouble would come,"
one said, "if we lost some of the
prosperity and still had high in-
terest rates and other high costs."
Another put it more bluntly:
"Who in hell knows what John Q.
Public is going to do on election
day?"
The GOP, however, already has
embarked on its program by send-
ing all Republican candidates for
the House and Senate a tipsheet
on interest rates, complete with
instructions from House Republi-
can Leader Gerald R. Ford of
Michigan on how to use the mate-
rial.
High Interest.
The Democratic party already is
widely split over what to do about
high interest, even to. the extent
of a verbal confrontation last week
between the party's present and
past leaders.
When former President Harry
S. Truman said these rates could
lead the country into a depres-

sion, President Johnson replied he
is concerned but disagrees with
Truman's conclusion.
Pressure for some move by the
administration seemed to build to
a peak last week and one top gov-
ernment source said there is a
reasonably good possibility that
the administration will recom-
mend suspension of the 7 per cent
investment tax credit to help re-
duce inflationary pressures.
Business Expansion
Chairman Russell B. Long (D-
La) of the Senate Finance Com-
mittee, introduced such a meas-
ure on Tuesday, contending busi-
ness expansion is a culprit in rais-
ing interest rates.
The White House remained si-
lent and Long concedes his bill
has scant chance unless Johnson
endorses it.
Mortgage Money
Togetherness is also lacking be-
tween administration officials and
Chairman Wright Patman (D-
Tex) of the House Banking Com-
mittee, who are backing different
bills designed to dampen the hot
interest rate war for savings be-
tween commercial banks and sav-

ings and loan associations which money and is losing confidence in
has dried up much of the nation's the economy, said Ullman, a mem-
mortgage money. ber of the tax-writing House Ways
The House is scheduled to vote and Means Committee.
on the question Wednesday and Tougher Policy
has then ntinn of suhstitufina the

IlAb W1 lt gJ*, U U l CahU * VtV..S1 h USi1
administration's plan for Pat-
man,'s the Federal Reserve Board
to act at its discretion. Patman
sees this as no answer at all.
In anticipation of the vote, the
AFL-CIO yesterday made public
a letter it'sent to all House mem-
bers urging approval of Patman's
bill which would roll back interest
rates on commercial banks' time
deposits of $100,000 and less to
4.5 per cent.
Labor, however, urged extension
of the ceiling to all time deposits.
Economic Instability
Rep. Al Ullman (D-Ore) sees
high interest and economic insta-
bility as a grave danger to the
Democrats this year. "Dissatisfac-
tion in the country is basically
economic," he said.
"Americans don't like the Viet
Nam war but they don't see any
reasonable alternative."
The consumer is feeling the
pinch of both inflation and tight

He said the administration
should adoptha tougher policy,
recommend and fight for an in-
crease in corporate taxes and sus-
pension of the investment credit.
Rep. Hale Boggs (D-La), House
Democratic whip, said, however,
that the effect of high interest in
the election is uncertain.
"There is concern over infla-
tion," he said, "but there's also
concern over the stock market
and deflation. I'm not so sure we
won't have some deflation before
now and November."
Small Investor
A retiring Democratic House
member said high interest is a
two-way street. It costs more to
borrow, he noted, but the small
investor is getting more for his
money, too.
In its tipsheet, the committee
says Johnson's "Great Society"
has created two different interest
rates-one for the poor and one
for the rich-with the rich man
getting the better deal.
Phone 2-6264

,A

PRUL JULIE
DEEEDIREE
"ALFRED
HITCHCCK'S
'TURD !
TECNniCOLOR
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE
Next
"A FINE MADNESS"

.4

I)AILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN '4
....:... ...........M1...... .".. VS. "" ." Y :"r: .....................r.{. r.:i{:.V.. .. '
........ ............. " . r4..r.Y 11 ..":
{. . :"": : .1: .1 . .1. .l- : . n... P} ... .........L................ }.... ...... ...... . . . . .}....*.....*..~....*. . . .

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPiLW IIiTTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; clay
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4
,.Gneral Notices
Homecoming Mass Meeting: Tues.,
Sept. 6, 7:30 p.m., Union Ballroom.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS CLOUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Organizaations who
are planning to be active for the Fall
Term must be registered in the Office
of Student Organizations by Fri., Sept.
16. Forms are available in Room 1011
SAB.
U. of M. Amateur Radio Club will'
hold its first meeting of the fall term
on Wed., Sept. 7 at 7 p.m. in Room
4511 East Engineering. Everyone inter-
ested is invited to come.
Lutheran Student Chapel, Worship
services at 9:30 & 11 a.m Sept. 4.
6 p.m., supper followed bw program at
7. "Your Church on the Campus"
Pastor Yoder and the vestry, Hill St.
at Forest Ave.
Nwman Center, Picnic to Portage
Lake, Sept. 5, 9 a.m., Newman Center,
331 Thompson. Bring cars.
University Faculty and Staff Meeting:

President Hatcher will give his an-
nual address to the faculty and staff
on Monday evening, Sept.. 12, !at 8
p.m., in the Rackham Lecture Hall.
All staff members and their wives are
invited. The five Distinguished Faculty
Achievement Awards and the six Dis-
tinguished Service Awards for Instruc-
tors, Assistant Professors, and Junior
Associate Professors will be presented
at this meeting. A reception will be
held in the Michigan League Ballroom
immediately after- the conclusion of
the meeting.
The Michigan Memorial-Phoenix Proj-
ect invites requests for faculty research
grants to support research within the
scope of the term "peaceful uses of
nuclear= energy." The Project is par-
ticularly interested in studies concerned
with : Biological Effects of Radiation,
Radiation Dosimetry, New Uses of Iso-
topes, New Tracer Techniques, Direct
Conversion of Nuclear Energy to Elec-
trical Energy, The Fusion Process, Plas-
mas as Related to Controlled Fusion,
Radiation Chemistry, Nuclear Weapons
Proliferation and Disarmament, Psy-
chological Attitudes Toward Nuclear
Energy Hazards, Evaluation of Hazards
to Urban Populations from Nuclear
Activities, and Economic Studies of
Nuclear Activities Including Power Pro-
ductior. The Project will not support
work whose only relation to nuclear
energy is a routine use of isotope
tracer techniques.
Requests for grants of $3000 or less
are most appropriate. Grants may cov-
er equipment, supplies, research assist-
ance, and field trips. Applications for
these grants should be returned to
the Phoenix Project by Fri., Sept. 30,
1966. Grants will be made, by Dec. 1,
1966.
Application blanks may be obtained
from the office of the Phoenix Proj-
ect at the Phoenix Memorial Labora-
tory on the North Campus or by call-
ing 764-6213.
Students: Those who withdraw dur-
ing the third through sixth week of
classes (Sept. 19 through Oct. 14, 1966)
shall pay a disenroliment fee of $30
or shall forfeit 50 per cent of the
assessed fee, whichever is larger. With-
drawal Form No. 615, obtainable at

i

school offices, must be dated not later
than Oct. 14, 1966 to allow you to qual-
ify fol' the refund.
If you wish to drop all courses and
do not elect others, you are considered
as being in a withdrawal status. Ask
for withdrawal form at your school
office; the Change of Elections Permit
is not required.
Doctoral Examination for Courtney
Johnson, Jr., English Language and
Literature; thesis: "The Problem of Sex
in tpe Writings of Henry James," Tues.,
Sept. 6,. Room 6 Angell Hall, at 9:30
a.m. Chairman, L. H. Powers.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Invitation to All December Grads and
Seniors: Any student with a minimum
of 12 semester hours at the University
may register at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments for services in teacher place-
ment or general placement, including
business, government, industry, and
overseas. You are welcome to browse
through listings of current openings,
employers in all areas of the U.S.,
schools, government, and industry.
Hours: 8:30-12:00 and 1:30-4:30 Monday
through Friday.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Eastern Airlines, Detroit, Mich. - 2
openings in sales/marketing areas. Re-
cent grads with any degree major.
Sales promotion activities and public
relations work.
Standard Register Co., Southfield,
Mich.-Sales Representative for busi-
ness forms. Traveling in local territory.
BA, married man at least 25 who has
fulfilled military obligations.
Department of Health, Welfare and
Education, Audit Agency, Lansing, Mich.

'

-At least 24 hrs. of acctg. courses and
some experience. Some overnight travel.
North Electric Co., Galion, Ohio -
BS electronic engineer or associate de-
grees in Electronics field. Stressing
communication and circuits work.
Sta-Rite Industries, Inc., Delavan,
Wis.-Marketing research analyst. Grad
major in econ. or social sci. One or
two yrs. exper. helpful.
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.

II

611111 BUiLD
ONE EYED JACKS
(dir. Marlon Brando-1961). American. Starring Marion Brando,
Karl Malden, Katy Jurado. The most famous of the psychological or
method westerns. Brando at his best!
Saturday and Sunday at 7 and 9:15 P.M.

I

TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following schools need teachers
for Sept., 1966:
Orchard Lake, Mich., West Bloomfield
Hills Schools-Type A, Elem.; Commer-
cial.
Portland, Mich.-Boys PE.
Roseville, Mich.-Speech Correction;
Train. Ment. Retarded; Visiting Teach-
ers.
Saginaw, Mich.-Retailing; Biology or
any Science; Math; English.
Saginaw, Mich., Saginaw Township
Schools-Band.
St. Clair Shores, Lake Shore High
School-Ind. Arts; J.H. Drafting; Voc.
Elect.
St. Clair Shores, So. Lake Schools-
Boys PE.
Trenton, Mich.-Bus. Educ.
Walled Lake, iMch.-J.H. Vocal.
Whitmore Lake, Mich.-Elem.; J.H.
Math, Library.
Ypsilanti, Mich., Lincoln Cons. School
-H.S. Math; J.H. Math/Science; Elem.
Forest Lawn, Ill.-Chem./Physics/Biol.
ogy; Vocal Music.
Fayette, Obio-Instr./Vocal Music.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, Education
Division, 3200 SAB, 764-7462.

ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM

STILL ONLY 50c

I



HOMECOMING '66
MASS
E NTERTAINMENT
THRILLS
INVOLVEMENT,
NOVELTY,
G Ross
Tuesday, Sept. 6th . .. 7:30 P.M.
Union Ballroom

0
dRAMRi

Continuous Today
From 1 O'clock

"DEVASTATING! BRILLIANT! STUNNING!"
(Crowther, N.Y. Times)
"MASTERFUL! ONE OF THE GREAT
FILMS OF OUR TIME!"-Cue Magazine
"MARVELOUS TO BEHOLD! ONE OF THE
IMPORTANT FILMS OF THIS YEAR!"
-N.Y. Daily News

ROBlUERT I~
REDFORD
CHARLES BRONSON
KATE RID., MARY BDNAM
JOmimI m " gIMMI II'GK TECHNICOLOW
at 1:30-5:30-9:40
PLUS

F
4
V
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P

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To readers and admirers of "The
Fountainhead,' "Atlas Shrugged"
and "For the New Intellectual"
Enrollment is now open for the
NATHANIEL BRANDEN
lectures on basic principles of
OBJECTIVISM
the ph ilospohy of
AYN
RAND
and its application to psychology
For a descriptive brochure please
write or phone the local business
representative of NATHANIEL
BRANDEN INSTITUTE
Irving J. Ralph-2635
W. Delhi Rd.
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48103
NO 3-3205

Phone 482-2056
OEN 0RPENTER RD
OPEN 7:00
NOW SHOWING

TECHNICOLORO Shown of 7:30,
ALSO- 12:30
IMF, Mase

ACADEMY
AWARD
WINNER
"BEST FOREIGN
FILM OFTHE
YEAR!"
"Everything about 'A Shop on Main
Street' is just right. What more can
be said in praise!'"
-Michigan Daily
ANNOUNCING

I

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QI011
NEW
KIND OF LOVE
TECHNICOLOR 3:25-7:30
* NEXT
"THE LAST OF THE
SECRET AGENTS"
Plus "DONOVAN'S REEF"

I

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TAo dnp4 01 e4taw'ah C
WELCOMES ALL STUDENTS
We have doubled our crew to give you
the fastest delivery service.
Call 761-0001
GIANT
12-INCH 14-INCH 16-INCH

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..,.

Shown at 9:25 UNIWWW
PLUS: "UNFAMILIAR SPORTS"
2 COLOR CARTOONS
FIREWORKS SUNDAY
N ITE

'I

I

the second annual opening
of

/I

.F
*

e o.en 0con
LUNCHES DINNERS4
also
The Golden Hour-Plus Two
Cocktails 4:00 P.M. to 7:00 P.M.
A Dancing '9:30 to 1: 50

I

I

with
MICHAEL COONEY
folk-singer & hobbit impervious-
brandishing 12-string & 6-string guitar,
kazoo, 6-string & 5-string banjo, autoharp,
micro phone, guitar strap, and track

PLAIN CHEESE PIZZA ............... $1.25
ONE ITEM PIZZA...................1.35
TWO ITEM PIZZA ........ ..... . 1.65
THREE ITEM PIZZA ...... ....... . 1.90
SHRIMP PIZZA ................. . . 1.50
SUPER PIZZA .............. 2.25
ADDITIONAL ITEMS...................30
DINNERS FOR DELIVERY:

$1.75
1.90
2.40
2.75
1.95
3.00
.40

$2.00
2.35
2.75
3.25
2.40
3.57
.45

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.

CHICKEN IN THE BASKET-One-half Fried Chicken . ....
JUMBO SHRIMP-Cocktail Sauce, Cole Slow ..............
FRIED BONELESS PERCH with Tartar Sauce .... ........
FISH AND CHIPS, Tartar Sauce.....................
FRIED DEEP SEA SCALLOPS with Tartar Sauce ............
ITALIAN SPAGHETTI with Meat Sauce (no potatoes.......
ITALIAN RAVIOLI with Meat Sauce (no potatoes).......
BREADED VEAL CUTLET with Chicken Gravy ........... .
GRILLED BABY BEEF LIVER with Bacon or Onions,..........
ROAST VERMONT TURKEY with Cranberry Sauce.. . ... .
ROAST PORK with Dressing .................. .......
ROAST SIRLOIN of BEEF with Pan Gravy...............
GRILLED CHOICE PORK CHOPS with Applesauce ..........
SPECIAL STRIP STEAK with Onion Rinag................ .

$1.50
1.75
1.40
1.40
1.75
1.35
1.50
1.75
1.50
1.90
1.85
1.90
1.90
2.00

friday, saturday, AND sunday

8:30 p.m.

1.27 (no tax) per person III

!1

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