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September 01, 1966 - Image 27

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-01

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1966

TILE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGENTMr..

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAflW ~TThTU

r 6i l G it l i l C.
r w n.

Fraternity Preparations for Fall Rush
Involve Picnics, Slides, Open Houses

By LAURENCE MEDOW
As the Interfraternity Council
begins its fall operations, empha-
sis is on preparation for formal
rush which begins Sept. 18. The
effort to persuade men to rush and
pledge fraternities has been oc-
cupying IFC all summer in rush
picnics, orientation slide programs
andopen houses.
The picnic project, begun last
year on an experimental basis, was
expanded this year to include
eight picnics in Michigan and one

in the Chicago area.'
were organizeds along
"strengthening the
orientation program
men," according to
Van House, '67E, IFC

The picnics
the lines of
University's
for fresh-
Richard E.
president.

peated this summer with a few
minor revisions.I
IFC also added an open house
program to which each freshman
was invited for the second night
of his three-day stay. Van House
said he felt the open houses were
very successful, noting that ap-i
proximately 60 per cent of thei
freshmen who came for orienta-
tion attended the open houses.-
Rush registration during orien-
tation, however, was discontinued
after its first employment last
year. Van House said summer
sign-up did not indicate a strong
interest in rushing and wasi
therefore dropped.
Prospective rushees had theirc
first opportunity to register forc
rush at Activities Day yesterday.
Van House predicted that about
500 men would sign up at that
time.
A Expanding System
A major concern of IFC is to
provide ancexpanding fraternity
system to accommodate the grow-
ing University enrollment. Follow-
ing these plans is IFC's announce-
ment that Pi Kappa Alpha will be
colonizing here this fall.
Though there is speculation that
Pi Kappa Alpha will participate in
formal rush, it will probably be
established with a program sim-
ilar to that used in the coloniza-
tion of Sigma Pi last winter.
The program, which would be-
gin shortly after formal rush ends,

would involve soliciting recom-
mendations from fraternities and
sororities and following these up
with interviews and rush parties.
Van House predicted the in-
creased grade-point average re-
quirements for pledging 'and in-
itiation would have little effect on
the size of this fall's rush. A by-
law revision passed last semester
changes the average required from
2.00 to 2.20.
Van House said that the change
may have the effect of scaring
away rushees and keeping some
men out of the fraternity system
in the future but added that it
opens the door wider for the aca-
demic-minded student as well as
closing it a little for those whose

potential for contributing to a
fraternity is lower. It will also in-
crease a concern with academics,
Van House said.
Speaker Program
Along the lines of increasing
academic-mindedness in the fra-
ternity system, IFC plans to spon-
sor an all campus speaker pro-
gram, inviting a prominent indi-
vidual in a given field to speak
each month.
A faculty speaker program aim-
ed at the five geographical dis-
tricts within the fraternity sys-
tem is also planned. As well as
hopefully increasing the size of
the audience for faculty speakers,
the program is also intended to
improve inter-house relations.

INTERNATIONAL PRESENTATIONS, 1966-1967
Choral Union Series
(in Hitt Auditorium)
CH ICAGOSYMPHONY ORCHESTRA .-............ . ...... Saturday, October 8
JEAN MARTINON, Conductor
GUIOMAR NOVAES, Pianist ... . .......... ..........Wednesday, October 12 /f
TORONTO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ..................... Thursday, November 3
SEIJI OZAWA, Conductor
AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE ... . .....................Thursday, November 17 r
THE CONSUL" (Menotti)
New York City Opera Company .......... (8:00) Sunday, November 20 '
DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA . .. . . ... . .. . .... (2:50) Sunday, January 8 4
SIXTEN EHRLING, Conductors;
ROYAL ITNTTDPEG RALET v'-i' d-..,J Fbr 4aA

I

A speaker appeared at each pic-'
nic to present the only formal part
of the program. Fraternity men
were then available to answer any
questions on all aspects of student
life for freshmen and their
parents.
The three picnics held in De-
troit and the one in Chicago were
more successful than the other
four held in smaller towns. Each
drew about 150 freshmen, Van
House said.
Orientation Program
In Ann Arbor, the slide program,
which was initiated as a part of
orientation last year to better
acquaint freshmen with the Greek
community on campus, was re-

City Leaders Review
Key Summer Issues

By NEAL BRUSS
Police-community relations, city
planning, and conservation were
Ann Arbor's most important issues
during the summer, according to
three city officials.
Mayor Wendell Hulcher, Repub-
lican Councilman.Richard Balz-
hiser, and Democratic Council-
man Robert Weeks all said that
the city had avoided a major ra-
cial outbreak because of inten-
sive communication between pub-
lic and official groups and in-
dividual efforts at maintaining or-
der.
Because of complaints about,
oversized police response to sev-
eral incidents, an evaluation of
police procedure was begun in Au-
gust, they said.
In response to a criticism of al-
leged discrimination in Ann Arbor,
thecity's:CivilRights Commission
' began a study of race relations
and job opportunities in the city.
Balzhiser said that police and
service administrators are recon-
sidering hiring and testing proced-
ures.
Housing Projects
Developers of a proposed sec-
o ond low-income housing project
were given a zoning permit Mon-
day after a summer of controver-
sy. The 400 units would be built
for persons with incomes between
$4000 and $9000, according to
Weeks. The site is on the city's
northeast side, close to North
Campus.
Hulcher praised an August meet-

ing of the Regents and the City
Council, which was devoted to dis-
cussing the site of the Residential
College and conservation of the
Huron River Valley.
Hulcher said that although no
action was taken by the two,
groups, the meeting openedcom-
munications and gave both sides
understanding of the wishes of
each other.
Hulcher hailed the rebuilding of
the Fuller Street Bridge to North
Campus as an important step in
the construction of the city's park-
way system. He said the bridge
will be open to traffic early in the
fall semester.
Sign Control
During the summer, Council
gave first reading approval to a
sign control ordinance. The pro-
posed legislation would prohibit
massive billboards and overhang-
ing signs in the city and provide
setback standards for roadside dis-
plays.
The city failed to write sign leg-
islation into the zoning code it
passed six years ago. Balzhiser said
that the proposed legislation would
be enforced by the police system.
Several parking structures were
planned by the city. During the
summer, the Forest-South Univer-
sity structure was completed and
two downtown structures were de-
signed.
Hulcher said the proposad May-
nard-East Liberty rooftop struc-
ture is still being designed.

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$2.25-$1.50 (Counter sale begins September 12)

ADDED OPERA PERFORMANCE
"LA TRAVIATA" (Verdi) ...... New York City Opera Company
(8:00 p.m.) Saturday, November 19 Counter Sale Sept. 12

j L V l -" J JZ . . . . . . . . . .
SHIRLEY VERRETT, Mezzo-soprano .. .
STOCKHOLM UNIVERSITY CHORUS ...
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA.....
ERICH L EINSDORF, Conductor
SINGLE CONCERTS:

Extra Series
(in HIll Auditorium)
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA .................. (2:50) Sunday, October
JEAN MARTINON, Conductor
EMIL GILELS, Pianist ............................. Tuesday, November

9
8
20

$5.00.$4.50-$4.00-$3.50-

. . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . a urady, e rury -t
...................Monday, March 13
...................Thursday, April 6
....................Saturday, April 8

"TosCA" (Puccini)
New York City

... . . . . ................ (2:30) Sunday, November'
Opera Company

MINNEAPOLIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ........... (2:50) Sunday, February 26
STANISLAW SKROWACZEWSKI, Conductor

JOSE GRECO AND SPANISH DANCE COMPANY...............Wednesday, March

8

SINGLE CONCERTS:

$5.00-$4.50-$4.00-$3.50-$2.50.$1 .50

(Counter sale begins September 12)
Chamber Arts Series
(in Rackham Auditorium)
CHAMBER SYMPHONY OF PHILADELPHIA ............ . Saturday, September 24
ANSHEL BRUSILOW, Conductor
*MOSCOW CHAMBER ORCHESTRA . ...................*Saturday, October 22
RUDOLF BARSHAI, Conductor
CHRISTIAN FERRAS, Violinist ..... ................Monday, November 14
MUSIC FROMMARLBORO .... .........................Monday, January 30
*ANDRES SEGOVIA, Guitarist .. ............ . ........*Tuesday, February 28
JACQUELINE DU PRE, Cellist, and .:... .... .......Monday, March 20
STEPHEN BISHOP, Pianist

iiJheVan

6t§iren

NO 2-2914

8 Nickels Arcde

_..__.
1 I

STUDENTS.-.. FACULTY
WELCOME 1A
to
Ann Arbor
We at Huron Valley National Bank wish to welcome you back to
Ann Arbor and to extend a warm invitation to those coming to
Ann Arbor for the first time to stop at our offices and get
acquainted. Our people will take a personal interest in all of your
financial needs and problems and are here to offer help and
counsel.
Our hours were set to make it easier for you to accomplish your
banking. If you cannot get in to do your banking during daytime
hours of 9:00 to 3:30, you will find us open until 8:00 on Friday
nights and from 9:00 until 12:00 noon on Saturdays.
Our Thrifty Checking Accounts were made to order for students.
You'll like the low cost and convenience. For just $2.50, you
receive 25 checks imprinted with your name. No maintenance
charge. No minimum balance required. Statements every two
months. Stop in and see us. We will be pleased to meet you, and
do what we can to make your U. of M. years as happy as possible.
HURON VALLY

BOSTON SYMPHONY CHAMBER PLAYERS........ . ......(2:30) Sunday, April
*Second performance scheduled on following evening: Moscow Chamber Orchestra, Oct. 23;
Segovia, Mar. 1 (Sold Out)
TICKETS: Telephone or write before ordering for any concert in Chamber Arts Series.
Fifth Annual Dance Festival
(in HilL Auditorium)

9

i

CK

IIOSHO NOH TROUPE, from Tokyo ................M.Nonday,
ROBERT JOFFREY BALLET ................... .....:..Wednesday,+
FIESTA EXICANA .............. . .... . . . ................Saturday,
SERIES TICKETS: $8.00-$6.00-$5.00
SINGLE PERFORMANCES: $4.0-$3.00-$2.00
Christmas Music

October
October
October

24
26
29

"MESSIAH" (Handel)-Three Performances ...........Friday, December
(Hill Auditorium) Saturday, December
(2:50) Sunday, December
TICKETS: $2.50--$2.00-$1.50-$1.00 (Counter sale begins October 3).
"PLAY OF DANIEL"-Three performances . .. ... .Thursday, December
(First Methodist Church Sanctuary) Friday, December
12th Century Musical Drama by Saturday, Decemberl
New York Pro Musica,
TICKETS: $5.00-$4.00-$3.00 (counter sale begins October 3).
Chamber Music Festival
(in Rackham Auditorium)

2
3
4

8
9
10

BORODIN QUARTET (from Moscow).. ................ Friday,
STOCKHOLM KYNDEL STRING QUARTET ................ . Saturday,
with PER-OLOF JOHNSON, Guitarist

February 17
February 18

TRIO ITALIANO D'ARCHI.. . .. . ............ . ..... .. (2:50) Sunday, February 19

I

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