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September 01, 1966 - Image 16

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-01

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MON $ Ix.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 1. 1966

a

PAGK SJ~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 196G

YOUR HEADQUARTERS
FOR U of M MUSIC
UNIVERSITY OF MICHGAN GLEE CLUB:
White Tie and Tails. .. On Tour
Songs of American Universities
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN BAND:
Kick Off, U.S.A... . Touchdown, U.S.A.
Hail Sousa. .. On Tour
P.S. We also have U of M Songbook

'Wedding Band' Selected As New Play Project

For

This Season's

Premiere

at Mendelssohn

"Wedding Band," an originalItion to bring the University pro-
drama by Negro playwright Alice! duction to New York after the

417
E. Liberty

MUSIC SHOP'

Phone
NO 2-0675

Childress, has been selected as the
New Play Project for 1966 by The
University Professional Theatre
Program, Executive Director Rob-
ert C. Schnitzer has announced.
The premiere production will
take place Dec. 7-11 in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre. Eugene V.
Wolsk, producer of "Lion In Win-
ter," and Max Allentuck, Broad-
way manager, have taken an op-

Michigan opening.
"Wedding Band" will be direct-
ed by Marcella Cisney, the PTP's
associate director, who staged the
the successful "An Evening's
Frost" in Ann Arbor and New
York, as the 1965 New Play Proj-
ect. Ed Whittstein, whose de-
signs for "Sgt. Musgrave's Dance"
won this year's Obie Award from
the New York critics, will create

the setting for the new produc-'
tion.
Miss Childress is a member of
the board of the New Drama-
tists Committee, where her new
play was given a reading which
attracted favorable attention. Her
earlier work, "Trouble In Mind,"
was well received in an Off
Broadway run some seasons ago.
She had been awarded a grant
by the University to enable her
to participate in the rehearsals;
and is also the recipient of a cre-
ative writing fellowship from
Radcliffe College. She was a
member of the original cast of
"Anna Lucasta" and the author
of a collection of short pieces en-

titled "Like One of the Family.
"Wedding Band" was chosenl
from over 200 scripts because of
the quality of its writing and its
pertinent and moving theme,",
Schnitzer stated in making the.
announcement. The Professional
Theatre Program annually pro-1
duces a new work for the theatre
as a basic policy. In 1962 it was
Richard Baldridge's "We Com-
rades Three." which will be re-
vised and re-staged in Ann* Arbor
this fall prior to its Lyceum The-
atre engagement. "The Child
Buyer" was the 1963 New Play:
"An Evening's Frost" by Donald
Hall won' the award in 1964 and
"Herkales," by Archibald Mac-

"Leish. was given a World Pre-
miere in 1965 under the Pro-
gram's aegis. "Wedding Band"
will be the fifth new work in live
seasons to be presented by the
University.
If "Wedding Band" proceeds to
Broadway it will also be the elev-
enth production originated tor
the PTP to enrich both the re-
gional and New York theatre
scenes, including "War & Peace,"
"Judith," "Man & Superman" and

"You Can't Take It With You,"
which were created by the Uni-
versity's resident company, The
APA, in Ann Arbor prior to New
York.
Other winners of the New Play
Project, including "An Evening's
Frost," moved to New York after
the Ann Arbor season. The plays
are performed at the Phoenix
Theatre in New York, the winter
home of the University's - APA.
The Phoenix Theatre is also sup-
ported by a subscription fund.

U

BOOKS ar.All SUPPLIES

Increased Integration Still
Inadequate Percentage-wise
ATLANTA, Ga. (/P--A substan- Educators in some states de-
tial increase in school integration scribed the increase in integra-
apparently will occur this fall tion as substantial or dramatic.
in much of the South under
pressure of federal law, courts. "We know that there will be a
guidelines and the threat of dramatic increase over last year,"
funds cutoffs. Schools begin said Dr. Allen Smith, assistant
opening this week. state superintendent of education
The number of Negroes attend- in Georgia. He said mostly rural
ing classes with white pupils will areas, excluding the large cities,
more than double in South Caro- expected to enroll more than 11,-
lina. Dramatic numerical increas- 000 Negro pupils in once-white
es are expected on the basis of schools-compared to a statewide
registration in some other areas. total of about 10,000 last year.
But the Southside percentage With nearly 5,000 of the 1965
of Negro pupils in desegregated figure accounted for by Atlanta
schools evidently remains low. alone, indications are that Geor-
Figures are difficult to obtain in gia's total for this school term
most states prior to the start of might be about double last year's
classes, count.
Tokenism is still the rule, a- Actual data was not available
Negro leader said, adding that in most school systems prior to
more court action will be neces- school opening, however, because
sary to speed up the desegrega- under the widely used freedom-
tion rate. of-choice plans pupils do not give

4

SMEDICINE
SDENTISTRY
0 PUBLIC
HEALTH

Our store is specially
equipped to fill your every
need, and a well informed
staff, including MEDICAL
and DENTAL students
wi lI serve you.

"It appears that this year is
going to be little, if any, better
than the past year in spite of
the efforts of the Federal Office

ALICE CHILDRES'

ROBERT SCHNITZER

TOVERBECK BOOkSTORE
The Medical Bookstore

&-p-~c~ e-~~'~z egrama e a ep ~of Education," said Ruby Hur-'
ley, Southeastern regional direc-
tor, National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People.
"The guidelines are making
little or no difference so far as
} boards of education are con-
coceined," she said. "We are still
COn t Cgoing to have to go back to the
courts."
SMrs. Hurley said she was cer-
tain a courthallengewlle
seblarderer made of Gov. George C. Wal-
on 0 so. urnzVCRstY lace's move to nullify school board
compliance agreements in Alaba-
ma. The governor's action made
f9~Ff Errs the outlook for integration an
uncertain one. Enactment of the
nullification law would leave lo-
!3t . 'tu1<Y43' cal school systems in the appar-
Ag~OR MfCI4A ~ent position of halting integra-
tion or signing new compliance
. pledges.

their race in registering.
To facilitate faculty integra-
tion, some school systems have set
up special programs. "Team
watching" is the plan in 16
schools at Chattanooga, Tenn.,
where integrated groups of teach-
ers will plan and evaluate class
work. In Clayton County, Ga., a
federally financed study will be
aimed at preparing other teach-
ers for integrated classes.
W. Lester Banks, executive sec-
retary of the NAACP in Virginia,
said there would be "a substan-
tial increase, no doubt about it."
But he said the rate of desegre-
gation still was unsatisfactory.
While Alabama's situation was
clouded by the governor's move
to nullify compliance agreements,
the majority of local systems have
moved to increase desegregation.
At Selmadcenter of a 1965 civil
rightss drive, the first eight
grades will desegregate, compared
to four grades last year.

~pF

Phone NO 3-9333

1216 S. University

I,

11

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LATER'

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Ugly is only skin-deep.
It may not be much to look at. But beneath that
humble exterior beats an air-cooled engine. It
won't boil over and ruin your piston rings. It won't
freeze over and ruin your life. It's in the back of
the car for better traction in snow and sand. And
it will give you about 29 miles to a gallon of gas.
After a while you get to like so much about the
VW, you even get to like what it looks like.
You find that there's enough legroom for al-
most anybody's legs. Enough headroom for almost
anybody's head. With a hat on it. Snug-fitting
bucket seats. Doors that close so well you can
hardly close them. (They're so airtight, it's better
to open the window a crack first.)
Those plain, unglamorous wheels are each sus-
pended independently. So when a bump makes
one wheel bounce, the bounce doesn't make the
other wheel bump. It's things like that you pay the
$1585 for, when- you buy a VW. The ugliness
doesn't add a thing to the cost of the car.
That's the beauty of it.

s

336 So.

State

11 'I

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