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January 14, 1967 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-01-14

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 1967

PAGE TWO THE MICHiGAN DAILY SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 1967

Ninth Creative Arts Festival
Brings Mancini, Rathbone

Sources Indicate Vietnamese Statesmen
May Change Views Toward Peace Talks

Ir

.... .

9'

By ANN L. MARCH10
The Ninth Annual Creative Arts
Festival ' will begin its two-week
celebration today. Featured in the
first concert will be Henry Man-
cini, one of the most popular con-
temporary composers. Winner of
both Oscar and Academy awards,
Mancini will probably include the
theme from the "Pink Panther,"
"Moon River," and "Charade."
Other musical events will in-
clude a jazz concert and jazz sym-
posium as well as the Andrew Hill
Juartet in concert. Jack Broken-
shaw, who will be featured in the
jazz concert-symposium, is an ex-
cellent percussionist, and has
opened 'his own nightclub in De-
troit.
"New Jazz"
Hill's music is different and
typical of the "new jazz" move-
ment. He tries to bring to the
listener the emotional and intel-
lectual content, the meaning of
the musicians themselves as men
and as artists. He has put out
many albums which illustrate this
"new jazz."
Basil Rathbone, one of the fore-
most interpreters of Shakespeare,
has been called the best equipped
actor on the English stage. He will
present a dramatic reading in the
festival. There will also. be a dra-
matic presentation by the PAP,
the same group of students and
faculty members that presented
the .controversial "Ubu Cornuta-
tus" of last year.
"Out of Our Minds," written by
two university students, Carolyn
Delevitt and Charles Troy, will be
Musket's contribution to the dra-
ORGAN I ZATI ON
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognied and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance,
Jan. 16, 83O-10:30 p.m., Women's Ath-'
letic Bldg.
a* *
University Lutheran Chapel. 1511
Washtenaw, Jan. 15, 9:45 and 11:15 a.m.
services conducted by the Rev. A.
Scheips. Holy Communion will be of-
fered. Bible class, 11:15 a.m.
Gamma Delta, Jan. 15, supper at 6
p.m. followed by ,7 program; Dr. Van
Wylen, dean of the Engineering School,
speaking on: "Christian Perspectives in
the University Setting," 1511 Washte-
naw, University Lutheran Chapel.
Young Friends, Jan. 15 supper at 6
p.m. followed by reading and acting
from "Winnie the Pooh"; Jan, 22, 6
p.m. dinner followed by discussion of
Erich Fromm's "The Art of Loving"
(read beforehand), Friends Center.
Graduate Outing Club, .Hiking and
C.U. party afterwards, Sun., Jan. 15, 2
p.m., Rackhain Bldg., Huron St. en-
trance.

matic element. Bruce Fisher com-
posed the score, while Jack Rouse,
director of last years "West Side
Story" will direct.
Poetry
Poetry will not be neglected.
There will be readings by Donald
Hall, Robert Bly and Michael
Hamburger. Hall is the univer-
sity's active and popular poet-in-
residence. Both he and Bly, a
leading midwestern poet, belong to
the American Writers Against the
Viet Nam War. Together with
Leslie Fiedler, writer-in-residence,
they will also present a sympo-
sum on literature. Michael Ham-
burger is not only a poet in his
own right but is a popular British
critic and German translator.
Director-in-residence David Mc-
Kendall will present two of his
latest flms. He has been instru-
mental in beginning cinema pro-
grams and filmmaking units at
several universities. Between the
two showings he will answer ques-
tions about his profession.
Lecture and Symposium
In addition there wil be two
previously unannounced events.
The first is a lectureon architec-
ture by the Parisian architect,
Yona Friedman. The second will
be an Inter-Arts Symposium in
which four members of the faculty
will discuss, "What Art Form Best
Reflects Today's Society?" Parti-
cipating will be Prof. of English,
Marvin Felheim, Assoc. Prof. of
Music, Edward Chudacoff, Prof.
of Art and chairman of the dept.,
Robert Iglehart and dance in-
structor Mrs. Gertrude Kuraft.
Mrs. Kuraft is an expert in ethno-
musicology.
Phone 482-2056
EnteetxnsnCARPENTER R0A0
NOW SHOWING OPEN 6:30 P.M.
-FREE HEATERS--

By KENNETH L. WHITING
SAIGON (')--Public and private
statements in the past week indi-
cate Vietnamese officials may be
changing their views toward talk-
ing peace with North Vietnam.
Top officials in the Saigon mil-
itary regime once regarded talk

of negotiations with suspicion and
distrust. Some equated negotia-
tions with sellout.
Now they appear willing to think
about what was unthinkable a few
months ago. The change is vague
and hard to define.

Conflist of Interest Appears
Not. To Disqualify Board

(Continued from page 1) 4
Board Member Marilyn Jean;
Kelly said that before the election
of the board two years ago, the
attorney general issued an opinion
that there is not a substantial con-
flict of interest with teachers at
public institutions but she added
that whether Augenstein can be
included in that decision depends
on how his role as department
head is defined. Miss Kelly teach-
es at Eastern Michigan University.,
Edwin Novak, Flint optometrist
serving on the board, said that if
a man is selected to fill a post
he is qualified to vote on the is-
sues.
Augenstein and James O'Neil,

both Republicans, won the two
open seats on the previously all-
Democrat board in the election
last November. O'Neil said last
night that he did not wish to
comment on Augenstein's alleged
conflict of interest but that he
favors making a formal board
policy statement on conflict of
interest.
Augestein, unavailable for com-
ment, has previously said that al-
though he had orignally decided
to disqualify himself he would
"have to consider that decision"
in light of the board's action Dec.
21. At that time the board voted
not to approvve the MSU pro-
posal and asked for a presentation
on the osteopathic college pro-
posal as soon as possible.

olr MICHIGAN

South Vietnamese leaders had
for many months summarily dis-
missed the possibility of negotiat-
ing with Hanoi. They held that
first the northern invasion of
South Vietnam must be crushed.
Only then would negotiations be
considered.
North Vietnam is hurting, but
in the opinion of analysists here,
far from defeated. Hanoi's strong,
well-equipped army is mostly in-
tact.
Premier Nguyen Cao Ky told
newsmen last Friday that "we are
getting closer to negotiations every
day."
TooExpensive
He said the Communists "are
suffering and we are stronger
than ever. They are finding the
war too expensive both in money
and men."
Some quarters were startled by
the premier's comment that "ne-
gotiations mean victory for us. It
means we have kept freedom in-
tact. It means they recognize they
cannot win."
Last Saturday, Ky said he was
willing to meet President Ho Chi
Jean-Luc
Godard
FestivaI
tonight
tomorrow
PART
(BAND OF
OUTS I DERS)
Comedy in the
tradition of
American
grade-B thriller.
French, subtitles.
7:00 & 9:05
ARCHITECTURE AUD.
STILL ONLY 50c=M

Minh of North Vietnam in a neu-
tral third country for peace talks.
He said he was "ready to go any-
where, anytime for talks."
Ky declined to say when he
thinks peace negotiations might
start or whether feelers have been
received from Hanoi.
Mistrust
"I never trust the Communists,
so I will wait until they present
something concrete," said the
premier.
There is no indication that
South Vietnam would like to end
the war just for the sake of ending
it, especially now with American
units doing most of the fighting.
South Vietnam's leaders are not
prepared to rush to a bargaining
table, but they show signs of ac-
cepting what may be inevitable.
Some agree the National Libera-
tion Front-Viet Cong-must be
included in any peace conference,
though they still say the front
should be part of the North Viet-
namese delegation and not have
an independent voice, as the Com-
munists demand.

Charade
TECHN ICOLOR
Music by Henry Mancini
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
Auditorium A 7 and 9:15 P.M.

An gell Hall

50c

STUDENT OR FACULTY I.D REQUIRED

presents

t

CINEMA II
presents
Grant and Audrey Hepburn
in

Cary

p

Boulding - Fiedler .,D iscussio0n
"THE ROLE OF THE AMERICAN WOMAN: IDLE IDOL?"
ELISE BOULDING, consultant to the international executive
of the Woman's International League For Peace and Freedom,

4

will have a discussion with LESLIE

FIEDLER, our Writer-in-

Residence.

Shown
at
7:15
12:00
ALSO-

MULTIPURPOSE ROOM-UGLI
J 7:30 P.M.
CONTEMPORARY DISCUSSION COMMITTEE

1

Shown at 8:40 Only
NAASETH"
OUR " PANISIlON
PLUS-THIRD BIG FEATURE
"MORO WITCH DOCTOR"
Shown at 10:50 Only

I

"A BEAUTIFUL FILM"-The New Yorker
GRAND PRIZE WINNER'
. - 1966 CANNES FILM
FESTIVAL
cIAUtDEGSOU
/PRESENTS
-A 'MAN
:.af*.AANd A WOOMAN

E5RIEERER5SKSW.
co-starring
CAMILLA SPARV- JAMES GREGORY-BEVERLY ADAMS
introducing DINO, DESI and BILLY - Featuring the "Slaygirls - Screenplay by HERBERT BAKER
Based on the novel by DONALD HAMILTON- Music by Lalo Schifrin
Produced by IRVING ALLEN - Directed by HENRY LEVIN -A Meadway-Claude Picture
TECHNICOLOR'
Next: "THE ENDLESS SUMMER"

1I

DIAL
8-6416

l w

NOW
Next:
"10:30 P.M. Summer"

Program Information } NO 2-6224
TODAY! TATE
THE LIQUIDATOR GOES FROM
ONE HOT-BED OF INTRIGUE
TO ANOTHER! 'e

4,

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A

UAC MUSKET '67
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Our

the new musical

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