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April 14, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-04-14

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIIJAX. APRIL 14. 1967

PAGI~ TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

"RIDaYat. APR..." AZ, AEV

FILMS
Oscar Winner Lacks
Subtlety, Sub stance

ART,

'U' Buses Spark Controversy

Detroit Exhibit: Showpiece of New Forms CfromPI
h ae d versity
" purchased.

By PAUL SAWYER1
"A Man for All Seasons" has
landed in town, complete with a
flourish of bugles, six shining Os-
cars, and a line to greet it that
stretched around to the gas sta-
tion on the corner. Obviously, with
financial prospects so shaky, the
Campus Theater was° obliged to
take austere economy measures:
tickets up to $1.75 and no free
passes for reviewers.
But then "A Man for All Sea-
sons" is good in all the things you
usually get when ticket prices are
high: costumes, scenery, pagean-
try, color, acting, and even com-
petent (but that's all) direction.
It only has one conspicious failing,
which is the script. Robert Bolt's
play is an empty, pompous rehash
of the death-rather-than-dishonor
theme, most recently seen in Ann
Arbor when several audiences last
week were forced to watch the
hero of "The Crucible" choose life,
then death, then life, etc., etc.,
etc., for about an hour, until he
died. They all do."
This film is based on Sir Tho-
mas More's refusal to endorse
Henry VIII's marriage to Anne
Boleyn and to recognize him as
the head of the Church in Eng-
land, "You should consider the
facts and not be swayed by all
this morality," says the unscrupu-
lous Cardinal Wolsey. "With a
little common sense, you would
make a good politician." The King
demands Sir Thomas's support; he
keeps silence.
They threaten him and imprison
him; he keeps silence. They cut
off his head.- And that's it, for
two hours and six Oscars. I'm not
against Honor per se, I guess, but
it seems that by now we can ex-
pect a subtler and more complex
discussion of moral situations in
literature and 'the film than this

simplistic kind of presentation.
The screenplay has the addi-
tional problem that the charac-
ters each have a very predictable,
very stereotyped mode of behavior.
There are the vicious Cromwell,
the treacherous lackey, the faith-
ful wife, and the foolish son-in-
law. The saving grace is the dia-
log, a great deal of which con-
sists of very clever repartee be-
tween Sir Thomas, himself a law-
yer, and his various persecutors.
Sir Thomas himself is exquisitely
acted by Paul Scofield, who takes
this potentially stiff and static role
and turns More into a wise, gentle,
stern, kindly old man, peculiarly
detached from his surroundings,
and strangely sad, like our image
of the lawyer Abraham Lincoln.
But Scofield is unable to create
much dramatic interest out of
this role. Sir Thomas, by his very
excess of wisdom and benevolence,
remains as predictable in his be-
havior as all the rest.
Weak Characterization
Part of the woodenness which
pervades this film stems from the
weak characterization; but ar-
other cause is the excessive talk-
iness of the script. Finally, Fred
Zinnemann's direction, though I
have called it competent, is clearly
modelled after an Olivier filmed
version of Shakespeare, but with-
out Olivier's dash and exuberance.
The characters move as if in a
pageant; the cook falls weeping
on cue as soon as Sir Thomas says
he must, release his servants; and
Vanessa Redgrave as Anne Boleyn
giggles stupidly as King Henry
sings to her. King Henry himself
is the stereotype of a lusty brawler,
in other words, a steal from Peter
O'Toole's Henry II in "Becket."
Well, as I said, there is lots of
color and there is Paul Scofield.
The Oscars could have done worse.
They have many times.

By ANDREW LUGG
The new exhibition at the D
troit Institute of Art, "Col
Image and Forum" completelyr
futes all those critics and case
viewers who maintain that mo
en American painting can bee
plained using such slogans
"minimal art" or "systematic a
or that the occasional article1
Lawrence Alloway is the last w
on the subject.
It is true that the artists restri
themselves to minimally structu
ing the painting space and th
most of them have banished t
sensuous from their work, but t
does not mean that they have li
ited their vision, or rather sta
ment. Quite the opposite, th
artists have, by controlling th
painting habits, liberated the
selves to investigating form
problems and a whole host
"propositions" that are usuallyr
served for philosophy or literatu
The artists represented in t
exhibition seem to be embarrass
by the "indulgence" of the a
stract expressionists. Paintingf
the sake of painting has beens
perceded by an aesthetic wh
denies the importance of thea
tual physical process, that sexu
activity which used to be cal
"being within the painting," a
extols the existence of the pain
ing (artifact) itself. The "psych
ogy" of the artist is irrelevant.1
attempts systematically to rem
himself from the expression
his own "struggle" with the pai
Thus, he uses acrylics instead
oils to give a smooth finish toY
work; and to banish from t
painting all the textures (perso
ality) that are part and parcel
oil painting. Some painters ha
gone further so that their wo
becomes "untouched by hum
hand."
In the end, this sort of Art
interested in intellectual proc
and not physical process. Itd
rives ideas thought out in advan
of the moment of commitment

De-
or,
re-
ual
od-
ex-
as
rt"
by
ord
'ict
ur- I
hat
the
his

during the painting process,
The Detroit exhibition shows
that this mode of painting can
produce works that incorporate a
large range of techniques and that
come from many different "points
of view."
A list of the artists exhibited-

canvas and are not thought out purpose. "Horse" by Anthony Caro,

which consists of bolted girders
and slabs of steel with all its
rough "earthiness" has a gentle
subtlety which sets Caro up, al-
most as being an electic. It is this
balancing between the massive
and the elegant that makes Caro
so important and his unerring

choice of "right" scale that sets
him apart from his imitators.
In this review I've hardly touch-
ed on the goodies that can be
seen now in Detroit. This exhibi-
tion is the most complete and var-
ied "show-piece" of modern art
that we have been privileged to
see hereabouts for a long time.

The DSR's action was report-
edly prompted by a rash of trans-
mission failures. Some difficulties
with brakes had been experienced
earlier, including one rear-end col-
lision.
According to V. E. Hardesty, re-
gional sales manager of Flxible,
the DSR's problem was prompted
by installation of an experimental
brake valve as original equipment
at DSR request.
Hardesy indicated that Flxible
agreed to DSR's request to take
back the coaches to avoid further
controversy.
Flxible says it is paying close

attention to its buses here.
'Whenever we hear of the tin-
iest thing wrong with any of our
brakes we send out our mechanics
to do a cmplete overhaul. We
can't afford the kind of publicity
we got in Detroit," adds Hardesty.
Koester says that when he heard
of the DSR trouble he talked to
"the superintendent of mainten-
ance at DSR in Detroit. He told
me the buses were fine and to go
ahead and buy them."
Some drivers are reluctant to
talk about the Flxible buses. They
indicate they fear University re-
prisal. "The school might stick
us with all the night and weekend
bus runs it we talked," explains
one quiet bus driver.

t

Frankenthaler,

Noland, Olitski,

Ellsworth Kelly, Stella, Wessel-
mann and some twenty others-is M O1scoS ow H g lihs
both impressive and a fairly com-
plete representation of these 1 y
"points of view." (That Rauchen-
berg and Larry Rivers have not R eopening
been included in the show - they

e
--

m
te
es
ei
m
na
of
re-
re
hi
se
ab-
fo
ich
ac-
ua]
le
nd
nt
01
H
Ove
o
nt
o
hi
the
n
of
av
ork
an
i
es
de-
uce
to
r

SALVATION!
That's right, brothers and sisters-you can save your
soul (and ease the wearying woe of finals) by taking
an evening off to gather with Sky and Nathan and
Harry the Horse and all the others in Ann Arbor
Civic Theatre's production of
GUYS and DOLLS
Next week in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre:
Wednesday through Saturday, 8:00 P.M.
Sunday, 7:00 P.M.

- both develop their ideas during
construction-establishes the lim-
e its of the exhibition).
r Tom Wesselmann is represented
.. by one of his Great American
l nudes, this one number 85, two
f seascapes and a study for a sea-
- scape. All of these, except Sea-
e scape No. 17, are in painted
s moulded plexiglass, which gives
d the paintings a bold impertinence
- which is in tune with the wry bu-
r mor of the subjects. Seascape No.
.. 17, is acrylic on canvas and shows
h two large breasts, beautifully at-
- tached to a suntanned body
l against blue. This raucous com-
d ment is highlighted by a sky blue
d line dividing the breasts from the
- sea which is so gentle that it al-
- most destroys the form. Almost.
e Helen Frankenthaler indicates
e how this form of painting can be
f used subjectively. Her Interiior
t. Landscape in subdued browns and
f greens presents a quiet invitation
s to "introspection" which is not
e normally associated with such
- monumental canvases.
f Ellsworth Kelly's huge canvases'
e oil painted, but flat, simple, un-
k adorned shapes, blocks of color,
n tightly controlled by the picture
space; austere statements; paint-
s ings, quite simply, that demand an
s existence for themselves - make
- even Gene Davis' glaring vertical
e stripes look thin, self-conscious.
And so on: we have Kenneth
Noland's diamonds, Jules Olitski's
gentle "hazes", Frank Stella's
shaped canvases and (of course)
Warhol. These paintings, simple,
there in all their monumentality,
have a presence to be reckoned
with-the content, colors, form a
definite, at times even offensive,
assault on our intellect and on
our senses.
The sculpture serves a similar
TONIGHT
SALT OF THE
EARTH
directed by Herbert
Biberman, 1953.
American. First time
in Ann Arbor-
revolutionary worker's
film for which the
writer, producer and
director were blacklisted.
SHORT:
"PAKH ITABAUET"
-Bolshoi Troupe
Saturday-Sunday
THE
WILD ONE
with Marlon Brando,
Lee Marvin. The
celebrated motorcycle
morality play.
SHORTS:
3 Mgoo cartoons
7:00 & 9:05
Architecture Aud.
STILL ONLY 50c
DIAL 5-6290

After months of shrouded sec- Expressionism. Grigaut explains
recy, the University Museum of Magnasco's development in the
Art will reopen on April 22, with exhibit booklet:
a featured exhibition of the worksb
of the eighteenth century Italian "First come episodes from the
painter, Alessandro Magnasco New Testament, followed by the
(1667-1749). religious scenes with monks,
The exhibition, which is a joint nuns and hermits, which are
effort of the University Museum perhaps the most characteristic
and the J. B. Speed Museum of part of Magnasco's oeuvre. Then
Louisville, will be the first retro- come a group of genre scenes,
gf Ma c which express unwittingly the
work ever presented in the United angoisse sous le masque so oft-
States. Prof. Paul Grigaut of the en found in Settecento Italy. A
history of art department, asso- series of landscapes, In which
ciate director of the museum, Magnasco shows himself to be
terms Magnasco "the most person- . . . un realiste du fantastique,
al artist of eighteenth century brings the exhibition to a close."
Italy." The remodeled museum will pro-
"Magnasco's technique," says vide Magnasco with a splendid set-
Grigaut, "is extraordinary. His ting. The main hall on the first
spontaneous fa presto style lead floor will now house contemporary
many to see him as the founder art; the hall was used formerly
of Impressionism." for portraits of past present Uni-
Conversely, Magnasco's sombre, versity presidents. Two side rooms,
tragic coloring make him a fore- former offices, are now the Parker
runner of the darkest aspects of Galleries of Oriental Art.

Nights & Sun.
$1.75

Today at
41i7:00 & 9:15

I I

wi

CAMP OUT AT
DURING
OFFICIAL HUMPHI
MONDAY, April 17:
ALL TIME BOG
HIGH
TUESDAY, April 18:
WORLD WAR I I
SAH
WEDNESDAY, April 1C
EARLY BOGART E:
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GRETA GARBO-T
NINOI
SATURDAY, SUNDAY,
The Rollicking MA
DUCK
7:00 & 9:05

CINEMA GUILD
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REY BOGART DAYS!
ART FAVORITE
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ON THE DESERT

CINEMA II
presents
RICHARID, LESTER'S
THE KNACK
.and how to get it!
Starring RITA TUSH INGHAM
Cinema I1 salutes Fritz Lyon and
"THE APPLE JOKE"
FRIDAY and Showings at
7,9, and 10:30 PA
SATURDAY 50C
Auditorium A, Angell Hall

WINNER
BEST

OF 6ACADEMY AWARDS INCLUDING
PICTURE OF THE YEAR!

COLUMBIA PICTUE FRED ZINNMANN'S mE,
presenTs
From the play by ROBERT1 BOLT ' 1U}W1

ARA

A.

XX(POSE OF HOODED
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LEGION
April 20, 21:
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The box office will open Monday at 10:00 and
remain open all week. Why not call t' 'ere (668-6300)
and see what you can get for a buck seventy-five!

I

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RX BROTHERS in:
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European Concerts-University of Michigan Men's Glee Club-Summer, 1967
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
MEN'S GLEE CLUB
cordially invites students and staff of the University
who are traveling abroad this summer
to any of its European concerts.
Performances in Europe include:
Helsinki, Finland-Tuesday, June 20-8:00 P.M.
Student Theatre, Ylioppilasteatteri, Seurascaari
Stockholm, Sweden-Thursday, June 22-8:00 P.M.
Skansen Island Theatre
Oslo, Norway-Sunday, June 25-
Folkemuseum-1:00 P.M.
Opening Ceremony (University of Oslo)-7:15 P.M.
Copenhagen,,Denmark-Monday, June 26-8:00 P.M.
Tivoli Amusement Pork
Amsterdam, Netherlands-Thursday, June 29
-8:00 P.M.
Bachzaal at Conservatory of Music

STILL ONLY 50c .r .

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jr ELIZABETH TAYLOR
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Feature Times
1:30 4:00

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IN ERNEST LEHMAN'S PRODUCTION OF
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The new... Flint adventure...
m T -Ah MT Vi

SHOW TIMES:
FRIDAY-7 & 9:30 P.M
SATURDAY-5, 7:30, 10 P.M.
SUNDAY-6, 8:30 P.M.

A

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