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April 09, 1967 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-04-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, APRIL 9 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

YfxrAlr granIMIM

SUNDAY, APRIL 9, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

9

Plan
As R

Trucking
retaliation

Lockouts

IN THE NEWS THIS WEEK:
Romney Vietnam Policy Gets
Rave Review From Johrnson

for

Strikes

WASHINGTON OP) - Trucking
industry negotiators announced
yesterday a nationwide shutdown
of 1500 major firms would begin
at midnight last night in retalia-
tion for continuing wildcat Team-
sters strikes.
M. M. Gordon, president of
Trucking Employers, Inc., an-
nounced the lockout action that

would affect some 250,000 of the
450,000 Teamsters Union members
involved in national contract ne-
gotiations with the industry.
Tiucking Employers scheduled
a news conference for 2 p.m. yes-
terday, the same time the federal
mediators hoped to get national
contract negotiations back on the
road and announced the lockout

Would Hat Bombing
For Vietnam Truce'
WASHINGTON (A-The United nam in obvious exploitation of the

then.
The scheduled shutdown would
affect the nation's biggest firms
that carry about 65 per cent of all
truck freight, and trigger the worst
trucking shutdown in the nation's
history.
Such a shutdown would also
have a severe effect on the opera-
tions of thousands of smaller com-
panies that operate as feeder lines
between the big firms.
The decision by Trucking Em-
ployers, Inc. was made while a
dozen -or, more small Teamsters
strikes continued in cities around
the country, and industry sources
said there were threats of hun-
dreds more similar walkouts.
But even as the threat of what
could develop into the nation's
worst transportation tie-up hung
over the bargaining table, federal
mediators resumed national con-
tract talks with representatives of
both sides in the dispute.
There was no immediate sign
that the government plans an 80-
day Taft - Hartley injunction
against the threatened shutdown.

Presumably officials were awaiting
an actual shutdown before decid-
ing what steps to take.
"The shutdown is to commence
at 12 midnight," said Gordon.
"Certainly we would call it off"
if all strikes end and the Team-
stcrs Union promises to stop all
future walkouts, he replied to a
question at a news conference.
The Teamsters Union issued a
statement deploring the truckers'
shutdown announcement, but said
"our negotiators are still ready to
negotiate around. the clock in an
effort to reach an agreement. We
reiterate our long-standing pledge
that we will not engage in a na-
tional trucking strike."
The statement, issued by Team-
sters general vice-president, Frank
E. Fitzsimmons, said "negotiators
for the nation's trucking compan-
ies-by calling a general lockout-
have broker. faith with Teamsters
negotiators, with the general pub-
lic, and with their obligations un-
der the Interstate Commerce Act
to serve the general public."

Fitzsimmons's statement said
the scattered walkouts are in sup-
port of legal demands for an 11-
cent, cost-of-living pay hike al-
ready due under the old contract
and that the Teamsters national
bargaining committee "has not
called a strike."
Union and industry negotiators,
resuming talks with chief federal
mediator William E. Simkin, still
were far apart on contract issues.
Trucking Employers, Inc. said
it had offered a total package of
wages, fringe benefits, and cost-
of-living pay hikes of 62 cents over
a three-year contract, compared
with Teamsters demands of more
than 90 cents an hour.
The trucking crisis overshadow-
ed for the moment a similar ma-
jor shutdown threatening most of
the nation's major railroads next
week. Six shop-craft unions call-
ed a strike for 6 a.m. Wednesday
but postponed it until 12:01 a.m.
Thursday duf to a legal technical-
ity on the date they were free to
strike.

By MICHAEL HEFFER
Daily News Anialysis
Michigan's Gov. George Romney
unveiled his Vietnam stand this
week-to rave reviews by Presi-'
dent Johnson. Romney's policy
position on Vietnam appeared to
be almost exactly the same as the
President's - he warned against
"massive military escalation" but
insisted "our military effort must
succeed."
The White House was so appre-
ciative of Romney's stand that it
was able to shrug off parts critical
of the administration by saying,

"Obviously, Gov. Romney had to
throw in a few partisan morsels,"
Romney had held back from
stating a position earlier because
he said he wanted to take a "fresh
look" at the war. His statements
on Vietnam came shortly after
those by Republican Sen. Edward
Brooke of Massachusetts, which
were also warmly received by the
President.
Romney has apparently taken
the advice of Sen. Clifford Case
(R-N.J.) who urged that possible
presidential candidates not make
Vietnam an issue.
Another major U.S. figure, Mar-

NEA Charges Detroit Has
UnarEducational System

States would halt the bombing of
North Vietnam if a cease-fire pro-
posed by South Vietnam goes into
effect, a State Department spokes-
man said yesterday.
At the same time, the Defense
Department made it clear that
U.S. air and naval forces will be
turned loose to strike swiftly if
the Communists should try to use
a truce period to flood arms and
supplies to their forces in South
Vietnam.
mThe State Department spokes-
man said lie knew of no Hanoi
response so far to Saigon's pro-
posal for a 24-hour Vietnam truce
on Buddha's birthday, May 23.
U.S. Consulted
He confirmed that the Saigon
regime had consulted with the
United States and its other allies
before, putting forward the latest
truce offer.
"The United States concurred
in the cease-fire proposal as did
the other allies," he said. "This
is an important Buddhist holiday,
and we agree that there should be
a cease-fire for its observance as
there was in the, case of Christ-
mas, New Year's and Tet.
"The cease-fire would include a
halt in the bombing of the North,"
he said.
Ground Rules
A ThePentagon said therground
rules for the proposed truce of-
fered by South Vietnam will be
the same as those which applied
in the four-day cease-fire during
Tet-the lunar new year 'period
last February.
However, the Defense Depart-
ment stressed, the South Vietna-
mese nd the United States "re-
serve the right to take appropriate
military action against substantial
re-supply activity in North Viet-

truce.'
What this means is that the
United States would lose no time
in sending Air Force and Navy
jets into Vietnam to attack truck
convoys, bridges and roads and to
hit at shipping moving from the.
North toward the South, loaded
with supplies and equipment.

Chemical-Biological WarfareDeveloped

(Continued from Page 1)
fections to researchers. And work-
ers must take four ,hot showers
daily with strong germicidal soap.
Despite precautions, there have
been E6 known cases of illness at
Detrick since 1960 due to accident-
al exposure to chemical or biolo-
gical materials. At least four re-
searchers died, two of them from
anthrax.
At Pine Bluff, Ark., the Penta-
gon keeps a highly skilled staff
:n standby basis in an elaborate
biological laboratory to begin pro-
ducing germ war agents in case
of emergency.
"You can't stockpile bacterio-
logical agents," said one expert.
"They're like vaccines-they have
a short shelf life and go out of.
date."
The Pine Bluff facility also
serves as a warehouse for the more
easily stored chemical warfare
agents, such as the riot control
gases that have been widely used
in Vietnam.
Most of the military's research
on gas and chemical weapons is
conducted at Edgewood Arsenal,
Md., where toxic materials are
tested on mice, animals and, even-
tually, human volunteers.

The Defense Department also
maintains plants for the produc-
tion and storage or nerve gases at
the Rocky Mountains Arsenal near
Denver and at Newport, Ind. The
main testing center for CBW is
the Desert Test Center near Dug-
way, Utah, a Joint Chiefs of Staff
facility the size of Rhode Island
that employs about 1,300 persons,
Virtually all work done there is
top-secret.
Chemical munitions are now
part of the Army's standard wea-
ponry and have been distributed
to active units around the world.
These include the M91 rocket
launcher, which can fire a rapid
salvo of 45 chemical rockets to tar-
gets 12,000 yards away, and the
Sergeant missile, which is capable
of delivering chemical or biologi-
cal warheads to a target 100 miles
away.
Colleges Involved
To further develop CBW skills,
the Defense Department has called
on the nation's colleges and uni-
versities. The Army now holds
contracts with 52 academic insti-
tutions for CBW research valued
at $6 millon. In addition, the Air
Force and Navy each has many
CBW research contracts with col-
leges and' universities.

The extent of CBW research on
the college campus is not fully
known, although officials list Ohio
State University, Johns Hopkins
University and the University of
Pennsylvania as the biggest con-
tractors.
Such campus research has been
criticized by the nation's scientific
community and sparked campus
protests, most notably at the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania where
human volunteers were used in one
series of experiments. Last month
university officials ended the bit-
ter dispute by announcing they
will not renew $845,000 worth of
CBW contracts.
The Penftagon; asked about such
objections, told the Associated
Press: "Research is necessary to
assure the security of our country
againt surprise attack or to mini-
mize surprise. In that regard,
every citizen has an obligation to
contribute."
But many top officials, asked
the same question in interviews,
took a different tack. One official
argued that "there have been
very few classified university con-
tracts. Almost all university work
done is unclassified."
The current national policy of
the United States regarding ac-

tual combat use of CBW is not
clear, although an Army field
manual points out that the nation
"is not a party to any treaty, now
in force, that prohibits or restricts
the use in warfare of toxic or non-
t ,xic gases, or smoke or incendiary
materials or of bacteriological war-
fare."
Roosevelt Policy
Officials have recently indicated
that the nation still adheres to
the policy laid down by President
Franklin D. Roosevelt; in 1943:
"I state categorically that we
shall under no circumstances re-
sort to the use of such weapons
unless they are first used by our
enemies."
The Johnson administration re-
peatedly has said it does not con-
sider the use of incapacitating
gases and anticrop chemicals in
Vietnam as "chemical and biologi-
cal warfare."
After revealing in March 1965
that what they called nauseating
tear gas is being used in Vietnam,
U.S. officials answered the result-
ing worldwide criticism by point-
ing out that the United States
traditionally has taken a stand
against inhumane gases which
were "outlawed by the general
opinion of civilized mankind."

WASHINGTON (R)-The Na-
tional Education Association said
in a report yesterday that econ-
omic and racial segregation are
the underlying causes of acute and
chronic ills in the Detroit public
schools system.
"Economic and racial segra-
;ation have been basic strands in+
an unfortunate web (f circum-
stances that has enmeshed De-
troit's public schools," said, the
report by the NEA Commission on
Professional Rights and Responsi-
bilities, headed by Cornelius Gis-
riel.,
It said Detroit's school situation
includes overcrowded classrooms,
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
PUNTA DEL ESTE, Uruguay --3
Ecuador, one of South America's
less-developed nations, threatened
yesterday to boycott the hemis-
pherp summit conference this week
unless President Johnson agrees.
to discuss turning the Alliance
for Progress into a virtual Marsh-
all Plan, the gigantic postwar U.S.!
program that helped restore Eu-
rope.
SAI xON-Menacing Communist
operations in the northern prov-
inces have led to arrangements
for the removal of all American
civilians from Hue and Quang Tri
if it is considered necessary, U.S.
spokesmen disclosed yesterday.

split sessions in many high schools,
high rates of student dropout and!
truancy in depressed areas, exten-
sive use of emergency substitute
teachers and excessive teacher
turnover.
Major blame for the situation
was placed by the investigative
committee on officials of the De-
troit public schools.
Credibility Gap
The, school administration, the
report said "appears to suffer from
a credibility gap between its prom-I
ises and the progress it has made
toward equalization of educational
opportunities between the ap-
parent interest it has evinced in
consulting groups on education
issues and the disinclination it has
shown to implement their recom-
mendations."
The investigation was made by
the NEA commission at the request
of the Detroit Education Associa-
tion. Schoolteachers, principals,
superintendents and university
staff members from six states were
included on the investigative com-
mittee.'

tin Luther King. Jr., also made a
policy statement on Vietnam this
week. He blasted U.S. involvement
in Vietnam and urged an admis-
sion "that we have been wrong
from the beginning of our ad-
venture in Vietnam."
Meanwhile, the cost and ferocity
of the fighting in Vietnam mount-
ed once again, while U Thant said
that peace prospects are "as dis-
tant today as they were a year
ago."
As the United States lost its
500th plane in the war, a Penta-
gon official estimated that the
cost of the air offensive was run-
ning at the rate of $2,000 a min-
ute, around the clock, in muni-
tions alone. -
The Saigon government made
some news of its own last week,
one day threatening to invade the
North, then later proposing a 24-
hour truce on the Buddha's birth-
day next month.
In the U.S., the labor scene re-
mained turbulent, with the truck-
ers joining the American Federa-
tion of Television, Radio Artists
and the National Farmers Organi-
zation on strike. While city work-
ers in Philadelphia took an un-
scheduled vacation during a dis-
pute over pensions, their counter-
parts in New York City reached
an agreement.
Some of the casualties of last
week were:
-Johnny Carson, who resigned
from his Tonight show because
reruns were played during the
AFTRA strike;
-Adam Clayton Powell, who
was told by a federal judge that
the courts may not interfere with
the denial of his House seat.
Powell will appeal;
-Hubert Humphrey, who con-
tinued his tour of European capi-
tals - amid anti-U.S. demonstra-
tions, such as the burning of the
U.S. flag ip Paris.

Ir

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