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April 09, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-04-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

PAGE TWO

TIDE MICHIGAN OAII.v

SUNDAY, APRIL 9,' 1967

PAGE TWO TUE MICIIIGIN DAILY SUNDAY. APRIL 9.1967

a . ar s +. . aE. .. wv .111A V #kl+ V A.

MUSIC
Boston Symphony Sparkles
In Matchless Performance

First Lelouch Movie Marked
By Sloppy Editing, Structure

1. Ft

By CLARENCE FANTO
It is always a welcome event
when the Boston Symphony Or-
chestra comes to town.
Last night at Hill Auditorium
was no exception as the BSO
blazed its way through two stand-
ard works and a brief new com-
position.
The Boston, among the na-
tion's top three or four orches-
tras, is a superbly fashioned in-,
strument to sonic virtuosity. Care-
fully nurtured by the late Serge
Koussevitsky, Charles Munch and
now Eric Leinsdorf, the orches-
tra's pure string tone is matched
only by the triumphant sonority
of its brass section and its clear-
as-a-reed wind section.
These various components of the
great orchestra were demonstrated
to their best advantage in Beet-
hoven's .Seventh Symphony and
Stravinsky's Firebird Suite.
The Beethoven performance was
a model of carefully controlled,
disciplined energy, with every or-
chestral detail shining forth with
complete clarity.
Some conductors (notably Tos-
canini) have favored interpreta
tions which pull out all the stops
and allow the music to spring
forth unhampered. But Leinsdorf
chose a more deliberate approach,.
seeking to combine well-controlled
intensity with a concern for phras-
ing, detail and melody.,
The result was a memorable
performance, characterized by vir-
tuosity at every turn. Doriot An-
thony-Dwyer's .superb flute solos
throughout the work, and espe-
cially in the first movement, de-
serve special mention. The rhyth-

mic propulsion of the fourth move-s
ment's coda was given added bril-
liance by the sure-footed work
of the brass and tympani.
An unusual aspect of the per-
formance was Leinsdorf's decision
to observe all the repeats. The
exposition of the first and last
movements and the third- move-
merit trio are rarely repeated, but
the practice is one which should
be more widespread. The sym-
phony took on new characteristics
with the adherence to Beethoven's
original score.
The brief, modern work on the
program, Gunther Schuller's Dy-
ptch for Brass Quintet and Or-
chestral is an intriguing work, but

not much more. It was well-per-
formed, but the brief composition
lacks depth, being merely a well-
constructed orchestral showpiece.
Schuller, a leading composer who
has successfully combined the or-
chestra made with jazz idioms (in
a far more sophisticated fashion
than Gershwin), has created far
more enduring works.
Stravinsky's Firebird Suite was
given an incandescent perform-
ance. The work could almost have
been written with the Boston
Symphony in mind, since the or-
chestra's overall coloring and the
strength of its brass and percus-
sion sections lent new brilliance
to the familiar score.

By ANDREW LUGG
With his second film, "A Man
And A Woman," Claude Lelouch
gained a considerable amount of
popularity hereabouts.
"To Be a Crook," Lelouch's first
film, has been released, presum-
ably, to ride the coat-tails of the
success of "A Man and A Woman."
And it probably will.
Notwithstanding this, however,
"Crook" presents little more than
good viewing for would-be film-
makers so that they might know
"what you cannot do."
"Crook" is a pastiche of ideas
and techniques of the New Wave
French directors and in particular
of Jean LucGodard. Lelouch starts
with the idea of "freewheeling
youth." Jacques, Amidou, Jean-
Pierre and Pierrot decide to break
out of their humdrum routine at
the Simca factory and become
crooks. "The four chose crime as
others chose religion" quips the
narrator.
After taking a beautiful deaf-
mute, Janine, in tow, the boys set
up a gangster school. Gradually,
through a careful study of the
movies, John Wayne, Steve Mc-
Queen, Sammy Davis, Jr. and
Gary Cooper, and of the relevant

literature, the boys progress from
gum stealing to kidnapping.
Whereupon the whole adventure
backfires to prove, necessarily,
that the real world will always
take its toll in the end.
This becomes clear when the
film is compared with Godard's
"Bande a part," from which
"Crook" is definitely derived. Both
films use a narrator, but whereas
Godard's narrator has something
to say, Lelouch's just mouths
pleasantries, with great pretention,
like, "this is not a movie, there is
no happy ending."
In other ways, too, Lelouch's
references to the cinema are ex-
tremely heavy-handed. The meet-
ing of the gang with William's
gang a la "Revenge of the' Co-
manches" is simply another op-
portunity for Lelouch's indulgent
camera to wander over marauding
bodies. It is as if Lelouch just real-
ized that the zoom lens exists. All
through the film zooming and
contrived camera angles are used
with as much thought as the
home-movie maker gives to his
"beach scene."
Lelouch, like Godard, would
probably maintain that such a
story-line is only a vehicle for an

investigation of cinema, its genres
and forms. It is here that Lelouch
really fails.
The slovenliness with which this
film was edited must also be ex-
posed. For example at the end,
when tragedy has taken over from
adventure, when Pierrot looses his
"cool" and starts to shoot at the
other members of the gang, 'a
lightin engineer saunters into the
background, thus completely ruin-
ing the tension of the scene. Add
to this excruciatingly bad lighting
of the film (many of the scenes
are carelessly overexposed) and
you will have a reasonable idea of
the film's shoddy structure.
In conclusion "Crook" illustrates
the difference between being in-
fluenced by other directors and
plagiarism., Being in vogue does
not exempt anyone from the de-
mands of good film-making:
thoughtful editing and controlled
shooting.

B'NAI B'RITH
HILLEL FOUNDATION
ATTN: PASSOVER MEALS
Lunch and Dinner will be available
during the entire Passover week if
you make reservations with the
Hillel secretary immediatelyat
63-4129. The prices will be
LUNCHES $1.85
DINNER $2.25
Reservations must be made Wednesday,.
April 12, and checks received by
Friday, April 14

4
4

_______________________ '

2ND
WEEK!

c

DIAL
8-6416

Tutorial Players Act
In Updated 'Birdie'

"A superb, gripping film
tells a strong suspense story!"
-INGENUE Magazine
"VIVID AND
IMAGINATIVE.. HIGHLY
ORIGINAL AND
THOUGHT-PROVOKING!'"
--Saturday Review

By LISSAMATROSS
It's a good thing the Ypsilanti
Greek Theatre left town when it
did.
Euripides simply wouldn't stand
up in competition with the 'Ann
Arbor Tutorial Project Players'
production of "Bye Bye Birdie,"
presented yesterday in the First
Baptist Church of Ypsilanti.
"Birdie" is at least as topical as
"Macbird"-Conrad, rock-and-roll
singer a la Presley, has been draft-
ed and comes to Sweet Apple,
Ohio, to bestow "one last kiss" on
a lucky teenage fan. Sort of like
Cassius Clay bestowing one last

W arhol's Drugtime Phase
Brings ExplodingInevitable

By ANDREW LUGG
Parker Tyler, in this month's
Evergreen, talks of the two stages
of Warhol-dragtime and drug-
time. Cinema Guild's attempt to
present dragtime (Blow Job), ear-
lier this year was thwarted. How-
ever drugtime will have its outing
tonight at Hill Auditorium.
To explain: dragtime occurs
during those extended encounters
with personalities and things of
which Warhol was too fond just
a few years ago. "Empire" and
"Sleep" are good examples of this
filmic counterpart of Burrough's
"long, hard look at the meat at
the end of the fork."
Warhol, who now considers
these films simply as exercises,
has developed the form of these
early epics in two ways.
Firstly, in terms of the flat
'U'ecelves
Ford Grant
(Continued from Page 1)
One such change would be the
creation of a Candidate in Phil-
osophy degree, which students
would get after the completion of
their doctoral course work but be-
fore completion of their doctoral
thesis.
Spurr said that both the Can-
didate in Philosophy proposal and
the Ford Foundation $41.5 million
grant work toward the same ends.{
The most significant of those
ends, according to Spurr, is enabl-
ing students to complete their pro-
grams in four years. Currently
students prolong their studies to
take non-academic work in order
to finance their education.
Schools receiving aid have gen-
erally the top 10 American gradu-
ate schools. The University's grad-
uate school ranks about fifth on a
scale based on the quality of doc-
toral programs in the humanities
and social sciences, according to a
study released last year by the
American Council of Education.

screen, he has made "Chelsea
Girls," a film of "lovers, dope
addicts, pretenders, homosexuals,
lesbians and heterosexuals . .
social games, drug games and sex
games;" a film which Richard
Goldstein of W.J.T. considers
strong enough to "take the starch
out of your collar." This is drug-
time.
On the other hand there is the
expanded cinema with the Velvet
Underground, Nico, Gerard and
the superstars-performances with
light, music, sound, dancing and
movement as well as films.
Over a year ago, Warhol and
part of The Velvet performed at
;the Film Festival. It is hard to
say that the piece has become
more "polished" with its long run
at The Dom and its more recent
outlet at The Gymnasium, both in
New York City. The piece has cer-
tainly changed, being now much
more dynamic and "offhanded"-
offhanded in a manner which
seems reserved for Warhol alone.
"Audiences" at Hill tonight will
see the last vestiges of dragtime
have been dispelled and that the
"Plastic Exploding Inevitable" is
set squarely in drugtime.
The usual imperatives - blow
your mind, strip the peel-are de-
cidedly in order.

hook on Floyd Patterson before
he, too, goes to boot camp.
Conrad, played by Willow Run
seventh - grader, Keith Johnson,
has been up-dated-the original
big-production number, "Honestly
Sincere," was replaced with the
Four Tops' "Can't Help Myself."
Motown was always better than
Broadway, anyhow.
Johnson, who says he goes to
all the Motown Reviews, lists "The
Temptations," "Supremes," and
Smokey Robinson and "The Mir-
acles" as his favorites. Maybe
Motown chief Barry Gordy should
start looking for his talent in the
Willow Run public schools. As
project director Dick Sleet said,
"Conrad, man, was out of sight."
The p r o j e c t production of
"Birdie" was the idea of Univer-
sity student Jim Dinerstein. The
Willow Run students practiced
under the direction of Judy Lea-
vitt for two months in the First
Baptist Church in Ann Arbor be-
fore moving to Ypsilanti for yes-
terday's presentation.
Tutors, tutees and parents filled
the church auditorium. There was
wild applause when the girls'
chorus, led by Pat Woods, did a
vigorous "bugaloo" across the
stage. When the "one last kiss"
finally came, it tore the audience
apart. "He kissed her!" cried one
little girl.
The lucky receipient of the kiss
was Sweet Apple sweetheart Kim
McAffee, played by Sherry Boyd.
Miss Boyd has a lovely soprano
voice and did a fine job of "How
Lovely To Be a Woman" and "One
Dennis Smith who doubled as
Ed Sullivan and Kim's hometown
boyfriend, Hugo, was very good,
especially when he punched out
Conrad. Cheryl Johnson was an
excellent Mrs. Jones (the mayor's
wife) and was particularly effec-
tive in screaming and fainting.
The final production number,
the Four Tops' "What Becomes of
the Broken Hearted," ought to
make even the University Players
jealous.
Something To Swap?
Try Daily Classifieds

The
It. A
WEDNESDAY,,
8:00 p.m.-The C
sian and East Euri
will present a sen
Leonard Schapiro,
political science at
School of Economics
Science, on the subj
A Political Assessme
Years" at Aud. A in
8:00 p.m. - Rot
dean of the School
Drama at Yale willc
wood Lecture entit
Actions, Modern Ey
ham Lecture Hall.
THURSDAY,
2:10 p.m.-The CE
sian and East Eur
will present a sen
Leonard Schapiro,
political science at
School of Economics
Science on "Chan
Party and Governm
Fall of Khrushchev
Phone 434-
OPEN 6:30
NOW SHOw

Week To Comne:
am us Calendar
APRIL 12 Conference Room of the Rackham
Bldg.
enter for Rus- 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.-The Cinema
opean Studies Guild will present Herbert Biber-
ninar led by man's "Salt of the Earth" at the
professor of Architecture Aud.
the London FRIDAY, APRIL 14
s and Political 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.-The Cinema
ect of "Lenin: Guild will present Herbert Biber-
nt After Fifty man's "Salt of the Earth" at thej
Angell Hall. Architecture Aud.
bert Brustein, SATURDAY, APRIL 15
of Music and 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.-The Cinema
deliver a Hop- Guild will present Laslo Benedek's
led "Classical "The Wild One" at the Architec-
yes" at Rack- ture Aud.
SUNDAY, APRIL 16
APRIL 13 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.-The Cinema
enter for Rus- Guild will present Laslo Benedek's
opean Studies "The Wild One" at the Architec-
ninar led by ture Aud.
professor of
the London
s and Political
ges in Soviet
cent Since the
" at the East
01 30
TONIGHT
RPENTER MAl
P M .
KING DE
N THE DUST
Dir. Clarence Brown,
1949. Powerful tale
from Faulkner's
novel. Bigotry and
mob violence in
deep South. Shot in
Oxford, Miss.
at 7:20 & 10:40
SPECIAL FEATURE!
TUESDAY
American Film Maker
ROBERT BREER
Discussion & Films
SEE...
THE107STORY:OO& 9:05 P.M.
LEAP FOR ARCHITECTURE AUD.
LOVE I
{I STILL ONLY 50c

THE THEATRICAL EVENT
OF THE SEASON!
S. LUROK mEN
oRIT TOL
vie
of England
Director: VAL MAY
MASONIC AUDITORIUM
May 3, 4-8:20 P.M.
"HAMLET," Wed., May 3
"ROMEO & JULIET," Thurs., May 4"
$5.50-4.50-3.50-2.50
at Masonic Temple Box Office
J. L. Hudson's & Grinnell's
SPECIAL STUDENT GROUP RATES
Mail Orders to Masonic Temple
500 Temple, Detroit, Mich. 48201
Encl. stamped, self-addressed envel.
DIAL 5-6290

f

-U

I

Julie
Christie
her first role since
her Academy Award
for-'Darling"

N ~

ANJ M IN -FkM PRcO TON "-A UNIVERSALRELEASE
April 13th: "A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS"

Eta
i
I
i

NOW!
LIMITED
4GAGEMENT
SPana2

Feature Times:
1:00-2:50-5:00
T A I7:05-9:15
fioness GINA&u abrigida
raDisO t (
Bvsoflan MMOCIOR .X:

pr, I

451"
TECHNICOLOR

Oskar
Werner
wvinner of the
New York Critics'
Best Actor Award

...)

SPECIAL SCHEDULE
SUNDAY MATINEES!
No admission after show
starts. House will be cleared
after each show!

THURS.

ATTENTION:
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
KAPPA ALPHA THETA
DELTA UPSILON
Cordially invite yov toa Tea,

p Feature Fi
v OB OFP
ShowEamn

f
i

FLINT
STRIKES
AGAIN!
In the
Virgin Islands.
where the
bad guys
are girls! '

20th CENTURYFOX PRESENTS
The new... Flint adventure...
FLNT
A SAUL DAVIDJ PRODUCTION~.
"JAMES COBURN
Cinemascope Color by DeLuxe
Sot. Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9:05 P.M.

71
INCLU DING'
I 3ey{:4iE-
I

"WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?"
NOM"INATiONS
" BEST PICTURE OF TO!E YEAR"!}
Best Actress
Best Actor
Best Supporting Actress
Best Supporting Actor
Best Director
Best Screenplay
Best Cinematography
Best Film Editing
Best Costume Design
Best Art Direction
Best Music Score
Best Sound Direction
IN ERNEST LEHMAN'S PRODUCTION OF
EDWARD ALBEE'S
IFEU
muPuEumI

'I

I

I

i i

1I

t .r . mo

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