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April 08, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-04-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

!C A"TTTW" A'V lk'PVTr :4 i t dft*#

THE ICHI~A~ ATT

15A 'W'TnTVA 17AVIMI : 2, 196,LIL 1zzjQ L7

MUSIC
Sigma Phi Rides 'Roaring 20's' to Victory
Before Exuberant Audience at IFC Sing

2=======
_A YOFCI'L-ULEIN

By BETSY COHN
Mothers, girlfriends, students
and non-students were out of or-
der last evening as the winners of
Interfraternity Council sing were
announced at the Greek Theatre
er Hill Auditorium. Sigma Phi,
the roaring first place fraternity

manship parody, and praise to
fraternitymen. Their second year
as victors, the crew parodied three
sea chanties, as well as the upper-
classmen at the University. The
routine also included mopping the
stage with one of their more flop-
py and agile "Drunken Sailor-
ettes," to the harmonic rendition

victory
theme
Days
otherg
Flut
Red, V
Chi O
medley
chuga

winners, nad just sung a medley of of a song of the same name. steam
"20's Tunes" tied together by a The exuberant recipient of this to Cal
four-part harmony arrangement first place trophy, jaunted fes- . . .
of Rhapsody in Blue, The Roaring tively across the stage to receive stayed
Twenties, 5'2", etc., arranged by her trophy as well as John Man- second
Pat McCaffrey. ning, emcee-both of whom she nounc
The female victors, Alpha Xi gleefully spun around the stage. The
Delta, were choreographed into After "A Walk on the Wild a "ha
"The American Sea," a militant, Side," the gentlemen of Delta Up- of Mu
yet graceful arrangement of Sea- silon returned with a second place Alpha

y. The medley included
s from "Peter Gunn," "The
of Wine and Roses," and
gentle but "wild" selections.
tering across the stage in
White and Blue, the Alpha
mega travel bureau sang a
y of the U.S.A. "Chuga-
chugachug," the g r o u p
ed their way from Broadway
ifornia and to New Orleans
got stuck down south and
* there for a while until their
place victory was an-
ed.
Sammies (Mr. Manning has
,ng up," says "moo" instead
, so prefers to call Sigma
Mu Fraternity-Sammies),

Songwriter Mark Spoelstra
Catates Cante rbury Crowd

By MERYL SACKS
Mark Spoelstra, songwriter and
protest singer, is at Canterbury
House this weekend. Most striking
about Spoelstra, on stage and off,
is :his gentle manner and positive
attitude. He is a sensitive person,
and 'this trait is exhibited in the
songs he sings.
He began the evening with an
instrumental he wrote for his 12-
string guitar. The song, he said,
has no name; it has a very free
form expressing his feelings on
life, death, and happiness. The
.piece was an excellent one to be-
gin with, for it immediately ex-
hibited his outstanding talent on
12-string guitar and established
a strong rapport with the aud-
ienee. Spoelstra's sensitivity and
insight into human problems were

shown in the next few songs he
sang.
As a conscientious objector to
the draft, he spent two years
working in California in a child
development center, and while he
was there he wrote songs about
the lives of the people he was
working with. These are the songs
he sang, infusing each of them
with the emotion he must have
felt when he wrote them. One of
the songs, "Just A Hand to Hold,"
is about a. little boy killed in a hit
and run accident. Spoelstra says,
"Makes no difference where he's
from or where he's bound, makes
no difference if he's lost or found,
for he's dead and gone. . . . There
is a voice that speaks for black
and tan, the voice is for all of
man."

This is one of Spoelstra's older
songs. T o d a y his style has
changed; he is not writing the
same type of songs he used 'to
write. He says that he only likes
to sing his old songs when he can
sing his new ones "back to back"
with them.
He is in the process of forming
a band, which is a continuation
of his style change. Groups such
as the Mamas and the Papas, the
Jefferson A ir p1a n e, and the
Beatles have influenced Spoelstra.
In the band, he plans to improve
upon the sound of these groups,
and strive for a higher level of
musicianship. There is more com-
munication between a greater
number of people possible in a
band, Spoelstra says.
The band will not be any spe-
cific type of group, such as folk-
rock or blues. This openness in
style is an illustration of Spoel-
stra's comment that he does not
consider himself to be a folk-
singer."He is primarily a writer;
the music is secondary to the
lyrics, and only when there are
no words does he "freak out" on
the music. "Music is there to have
intercourse with the lyrics," he
says. In Spoelstra's songs, the.
music and the words are beauti-
fully integrated. He keeps the
guitar at a low enough level so
one can hear what he is singing,
but when he stops singing he is
free to exhibit his talent on his
instrument. He is widely acclaim-
ed to be the best living 12-string
guitar player.

brought forth kittens, roses and
all kinds of tender touches in
their medley of "My Favorite
Things." Composition and orig-
inal arrangements were done by,
Howard White and Allen Lichter.
An addition to their list of Au-
tumn Leaves," smiles, and other
favorite delights, the Sammies now
have a third place IFC trophy to
add to their collection.
Flappers, raccoon coats and oth-,
er ornaments of the "twenties"
accompanied the girls of Pi Beta
Phi in their very lively and imag-
inative reproduction of soft shoes
'Tip Toeing Through the Tulips"
and other aging memories. In part,
their presentation was like the
jerky, syncopated movements of,
the silent screen stars; humor-'
ous, light and well coordinated;
they received third place.
Six other fraternal (and soror-
al) organizations also sang; and
IFC conducted a full score at their
28th annual sing. Aside from the
aforementioned, the gr o u p s
brought with them guitars, ban-Y
jos, pianos, cap guns, spirit, crea-;
tivity and interesting musical coi-,
positions.
Birth control~
'Counsellor
Arraigned
(Continued from Page.1)
or dangerously naive about birth I
control measures."
"Right now I am in debt for'
$50,000," Baird said. "I believe in<
running a free clinic in order toz
distribute free birth control de-
vices to the poor and to college
students both 'married and un-
married."
Faces Prison Term
Baird also faces a long prison
term. "I face 13 years in prisonY
merely for talking about birtht
control. How dare anyone deny me
the right to talk about it." I
"We print pictures of ment
slaughtered on battle fields. This
is grotesque to me. But my show-
ing films of a birth control pill
can mean a prison term."
Baird does not believe that the
state has the right to direct any-
one about private morals. "These
laws date back a hundred years
from the time when women were
chattel. They are still chained by
the same archaic laws."

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Micnigan for which The
Michigan Siaily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Satirday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
intornation cal 764-9270.
SATURDAY, APRIL 8
Day Calendar
Michigan Structural Conference-Reg-
istration, Rackham Bldg., 8 a.m.
Phi Sigma Iota Convention-Michl-
gan Union, 9 a.m.
Cinema Guild-Clarence Brown's "In-
truder in the Dust": Architect'ire Aud.,
7 and 9:05 p.m.
Dept. of Speech University Players
Performance-Arthur Miller's "The Cru-
cible": Trueblood Aud., 8 p.m.
University Musical Society Choral Un-
ion Series Concert-Boston Symphony
Orchestra: Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital-Rose-
mary Russell, soprano: Recital Hall,
School of Music, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
TV Center Programs: On Sun., April
9, the following programs produced by
the TV Center will have their initial
telecast on Detroit stations:
8:30 a.m., WXYz-TV, Channel 7 -
"Understanding "Our World. India's
Traditional Theatre." Folk theatre of
India, with Prof. O. L. Chavarria-
Aguilar and Indian playwright, Balwant
Gargi.
12 Noon, WWJ-TV, Channel4-U-M:
150. "Michigan Today." Dr. Harlan
Hatcher and Dr. Wilbur K. Pierpont
bring the history of the U-M to the
present day, concluding this sesqui-,
centennial series.
Alpha Phi Sorority: Open for the
Spring Term, May 1 to June 23. Appli-
cations now being taken. Call the di-
rector: 662-7716.
Summary of Action Taken by Student
Government Council at Its Meeting
April 6, 1967
Approved: That SGC appoint the fol-
lowing delegates and alternates to the
1967 National Student Congress: Dele-
gates-Bruce Kahn, Ruth Baumann,
Leslie Mahler, Marty Lieberman. Al-
ternates-Sam Sherman, Sue Redfern,
Cheryl Schwartz.
Appointed: Bruce Kahn, Ruth Bau-
mann, Sam Sherman and Mike Davis
to serve on a joint SGC-GSC commit-
DIAL 5-6290

tee to work on a new plan of student
government during the summer.
Approved: Proposal A of the Consti-
tutional Amendment, Bylaw XII-Ma-
jor Issues Referenda-United States Na-.
tional Students Association.
Approved: That SGC appropriate the
sum of $50 to be turned over to Guild
House in order to help finance the
publication of their booklet "student
and University Decision-Making."
Appointed: Janice Sorkin and Mike
Koeneke to the Student Traffic Ad-
visory Board.
Approved: l The "Bases for Recogni-
tion" of Student Organizations enum-
erated in the "University Regulations
Concerning Student Organizations" are
hereby amended a) by deletion of sec-
tion (2) of the bases, and (b) by in-
serting in the place of that section
the following:
2. More than half of the total mem-
bership of any group eligible for the
rights and obligationis of a student or-
ganization as specified in these reg-
ulations must be students currently
enrolled, or else students who were
enrolled the immediately preceding se-
mster and are eligible to enroll the
immediatly subsquent on; AND at
least two-thirds the total membership
of any such organization must be stu-
dents, as defined above, or alumni of
the University, or people who while not
currently enrolled have either been en-
rolled at th University within one
calendar year previous to the start of
the current semester, or have paplied
for and not been denied admission to
the University for a term commencing
within one calendar year of the start
of the current semester; AND, every
such organization must have two stu-
dent officers entitled to attend every
meeting of the organization or any
part thereof, including all meetings
and caucuses restricted to officers or
any other sub-group of the total
membership. These two officers shall
be those whose signatures must be
submitted to SGC under the Proced-
ures for Recognition and Registration
of these regulations.
Groups having only students as vot-
ing members and officers shall be rec-
ognized as "student organizations." All
other groups meeting the requirements
of these bases shall be recognized as
"student - community organizations"
subject to all the rights and obliga-
tions of student organizations under
these regulations.
Nothing in this regulation shall be
construed as preventing any student
organization from including in its con-
stitution, bylaws, or stading rules, a
clause prohibiting non-students from
membership, franchise, or, holding of-
fice, in that organization.
Approved: That the amendment per-
mitting non-student participation in

student-community organizations will
be submitted to the student body in
the form of a referendum in the No-
vember, 1967 election.
Accepter: The bylaws of Inter-House+
Assembly.
Approved: That SGC form a special
committee which, in conjunction with
the Literary College Steering Commit-
tee, will elaborate the proposal and
submit it to the foundations in the
fall. This committee will consist of
members of the faculty and students
already involved in the project, in addi-
tion to any new, interested students.
That in the event that the com-
mittee has to call in education spe-
cialists to help design the courses,
etc., SGC allocate $300 to it upon the
written request of the committee chair-
man with the permission of the treas-
urer of SGC.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
INTERVIEW, THURS., APRIL 13-
United Airlines-Interviewing sopho-
mores primarily, jrs. considered, for
campus representative stewardess. You
fly with United this summer and re-
turn to campus as spokesman for the
airlines and its stewardess programs.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Mt. Carmel Mercy Hospital, Detroit,
Mich.-Two positions for person with
some college, but primarily interested
in working in professional medical en-
vironment, will bet rained on-the-job,
should have some aptitude for math.
EEG Technician, wave brain. Inhala-
tion Therapist, anesthesia.
Management Consultants, Through-
out U.S.-Food industry openings in
processing and marketing. Purchasingf,
packaging, ME, sales, mktg., oper..
mgmt.. Q.C., engrs., IE, Econ, and many
others.
- North American Philips Co., Inc., Nor-
elco, N.Y.C.-Mgr., Electronic Data Proc-
essing, EDP presently using 14010 con-
verting to 360-30. 3-5 yrs. with IBM 1401
or 360. Technical Writer, digital data
processing peripheral equip. product
literature, some EE educ., min. 2 yrs.
exper. writing binary logic literature.
A Michigan Area Progress Committee
-Director, administer program result-
ing in organization, dev. & implemen-
tation of econ. dev. and planning pro-
gram. Masters, gen. ed., community
organ., econ., poll. sei., or related field.
Strict bkgd. in behavioral sci. desirable,
35 yrs. old, 5 yrs, exper. in admin. ca-
pacity, knowl. surveying in res. meth-
ods, communication skills, ability to
provide consultation and guidance to
community organ. and gov. bodies.
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of

Appointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER P'LACEMENT SERVICE:
w12 SAi3-
TUES., APRI11. 1-
Camp Optimist, Grand Rapids, Mich.
--Day camp. Overnight, counselors, men
only, counselors.
THURS., APRIL 13-
United Airlines--Fly as stewardess all
summer and represent United back on
campus the following year. Prefer to
interview sophomores, will see jrs. Con-
tact Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB,
764-7460, for appointments.
* * *
Details ande pplications at Summer
Placement Service, 212 SAB, Lower Lev-
el.
Pa r-Time
Employment
Waitresses-For April 18, 22, 27, 28
& 29. Experience helpful but not nec-
essary. Possibilty of summer employ-
ment. Pay rate--$1.64 per hour. In-
terested applicants please contact:
Part-Time Employment Office, 2200
SAB. Phone: 764-7283.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognised and registered student or-
.ganizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAD.
* * *
Canterbury House, Poetry reading,
April 10, 8 p.m., 330 Maynard. Richard
Grossinger.
* * *
Folk Dance Club .(WAA), Folk dance,
Mon., April 10, 8:30-10:30 p.m., Women's
Athletic Bldg.
Across
Cmpus
SATURDAY, APRIL 8
7:00 and 9:05 p.m.--Cinema
Guild will p r e s e n t Clarence
Brown's "Intruder in the Dust"
in the Architecture Aud.

City Council Votes to Defer
Confidential Memo Debate

w

(Continued from Page 1)
fying themselves and giving rea-
sons why the information should
be released.
MCouncilmen James C. Riecker
and Paul Johnson, Republicans
from the Second and Third Wards,
respectively, disagreed with Weeks'
decision to release the informa-
tion. Riecker said that divulging
something marked confidential vi-
'olates a trust and destroys a means
of council-administration commu-
nieation.*
Charging that release of such
memios "violates moral ethics,"
Johnson said,. "I - feel we should
have some legislative censure, be-
cause we found the fink who turn-
ed it (the memo) over to The
Daily." He also called "question-
able," releasing the memo to one
paper "that has never been noted
for fair treatment of the council."
Hulcher likewise questioned Weeks'
release to one source and com-
mented that "The Daily is noted
for sensationalism."
Councilman Richard Balzhiser,
Republican from the Fifth Ward,
noted "factual errors," "infer-
ences and innuendos" in the
Daily article. He said that he
strongly objected to Daily Editor
Roger Rapoport. Balzhiser com-
mented- that he though Rapoport
Phone 434-0130
46N4an"O'LCARPENTER ROAD
FIRST OPEN 6:30 P.M. FIRST
RUN HELD OVER. RUN
THE MOST SHOCKING FILM
OF OUR GENERATION
S[[...
front AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL
Shown at 7:15-10:40 N
Shown at,9 P.M.MOnly
NoeFONDavuorioO8 SSMON
ilnieIRORDIL RobertB URN

"owes an apology to the Repub-
lican party" saying that "it would
seem wise to check the facts with
members of the other party to
make sure they are correct."
City Attorney Jacob F. Fahrner
said that the matter of giving the
authorization in the first place
was perfectly legal. He also said
that despite the council's author-
ization of the construction, Lar-
com was able to obtain further
concessions for the city.
Regarding future use of confi-
dential memos Fahr er stated he
would be "very careful" in what
he writes to council noting that
many of the memos deal with
pending motions.
TONIGHT
and TOMORROW
INTRUDER
IN THE DUST
Dir. Clarence Brown,
1949. Powerful tale
from Faulkner's
novel. Bigotry and
mob violence in
deep South. Shot in
Oxford, Miss.
SPECIAL FEATURE!
TUESDAY
American Film Maker
ROBERT BREER
Discussion & Films
7:00 & 9:05 P.M.
ARCHITECTURE AUD.
-STILL ONLY 50c

V

r
-,

ci"'E
TUESDAY, APRIL 1
THE FILMS OF R(
with Mr. Breeri
THE SEVENTI
"FOUND
by George N
with Pat Olesko, Nick B
Leslie Coutant as Teeni
The Incredible Fog Mac
Gerard Malango as Barc
Von Richthofen, April 2
Henry Chapier as his Ob
Proceeds contribL
Artistic Program ofI
Center of Ani

I
Al
i
e
:h
or
'1
be

7:00 & 9:05
)BERT BREER
r person &
H SEAL in
FILM"
anupel li
rtoni &
Chiffon &
line &
n Manferd
, 1918.
erKommandar
ted to the
)ramatic Arts
Arbor

SPECIAL SCHEDULE
SUNDAY MATINEES!
No admission after show
starts. House will be cleared
after each show!
FLINT
STRIKES
AGAIN !
In the
Virgin Islands 4iR
where the
bad guys ;Z
are gIrls!
20th CENTURY-FOX PRESENTSyr
The new,.., Flint adventure...
FaLINT
A SAUL DAVID PRODUCTION
"JAMES COBURN
Cinemascope Color by Deluxe

I

Starts Friday
CLAUDE LELOUCH
Director of
"TO BE A CROOK"
Has been nominated for
an Oscar, as
"BEST DIRECTOR"
and, his
"A Man and a Woman"
as "Best Foreign Film."
Judith Crist of the
World Journal Tribune
says: Claude Lelouch's
"TO BE A CROOK"
"EXCEEDS IN
CONTENT AND
CONCEPT 'A MAN
AND A WOMAN'!
is a diverting
caper and the
kidnapping is a
COMIC
MASTERPIECE!
BEST BET!"
Wande Hale of the
Daily News applauds
"TO BE A CROOK"
"1 OF 6 BEST"

I

11

I

I

-u
D
in

I

p.

ARCHITECTURE AUD.

STILL ONLY 50c

Sat. Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9:05 P.M.

Air

I PI 111111
framt! t
Hat-."K

' 49he 'ulitzer
cMuslcal Comedy
1:00-3:00-5:00
sts !7:05-9:15

One of only five films
recommended by
TIME Magazine

PW & fp~bi id
;a?: .

2ND DA
WEEK! 86416
"A superb, gripping film .
tells a strong suspense story!
-INGENUE Magazine
"VIVID AND
IMAGINATIVE... HIGHLY
r)/"'1K1A 1 Akin"

and
"NOT TO BE MISSED!"
-Cue Magazine
SHOW TIMES:
Fri., 7, 9, 11
Sat., 5, 7 9,1
Sun., 5, 7, 9
M-T h., 5, 7,

a

i
'< l '
1 ; ll't:
, t-l
n .,1 :::
' ;Jn I
"
L~
1.

:;~' .' i ; Wit"

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