100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 07, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-04-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE nTICHIGAI'1T DAILY

FRIDAY. APRTT7,19617

PAOE TWO THE MICHIGAN IJAILY

a awc.:VAai Lia .."Ju 4, 1 7V a
rn

Stockholm Chorus:
Excellent Ensemble

DRAMATIC VERSATILITY:
Oakland U Repertory Group Prospers
Under Acclaimed Producer J. Fernald

_i

Come to

.. 4R

COLLEGE LIFE

By H. F. KEUPER;
Last night the Stockholm Uni-t
versity Chorus, under the directionv
of Eskil Hemberg, performed fort
a Hill Auditorium audience ofs
about 2200 persons. Those souls
who remained faithful to the per-.
formers to the end of the concert
were ."amply, if not richly, re-
warded.
This writer has .witnessed manys
nor.e outstanding performances
bliy touring and resident collegiate,
aggregations; but seldom has heX
witnessed a demonstration ofX
such. undivided attention on the1
, part of the Stockholm chorus.
There is never a question as toe
Mr. Hemberg's authority. His 381
women and 24 men await his every
gesture and respond 'with some of
the most precise attacks and
sharp. releases ever to grace the;
walls .of Hill. Many of the church
and university choir members ini
the 'audience, it is hoped, learnedt
a great deal from the visitors. c
Their technical precision not-I
withstanding, the Stockholm per-
formers had a tendency to produce
remarkably similar sounds forr
each of the numbers in succession£
on the program. There were times
when the pitch in 'general, and
that of one section in particular,
wavered and then fell. On the4
whole, however, such errors were
subtle and might be attributed to
the weather and the general state
of exhaustion which every tour-
ing chorus member feels after a
while.
Mr. Hemberg's program opened
with Morley's."Fire! Fire!" which
gave the chorus the necessary on-
stage warm-up. By the time-that
they reached "Quarid mon mar"
by Orlando di Lasso, two numbers
later, the writer was searching the
chorus for those, 'four distinct
22 Coneerts
Planned For
Next Season
';The University Musical Society
has - announced a schedule of
twenty-two concerts for the 1967-
68 season.
The Choral Union and Extra
Series in Hill Auditorium and the
Chamber Arts Series in Rackham
Lecture Hall have been scheduled
as follows:
Choral, Union Series: Chicago
,Symphony. Orchestra,, Jean Mar-
tinon, conductor, 2:30 p.m. Sun-
day, Oct. 1; French National Or-
chestra, with pianist Eugene Isto-
min, Monday, Oct. 9; Vienna Sym-
phony, Thursday, Oct. 19; Christa
Ludwig, mezzo-soprano, Tuesday,
Oct. 31; "Carmina Burana," opera
by Carl Orff, Expo 67 production,
with Les Ballets Canadiens, Sun-
day, Nov. 19; Royal Philharmonic
Orchestra of London, Wednesday,
Jan. 17;' Nathan Milstein, violinist,
Monday, Jan; 29; Helsinki Phil.
harmoni'c Orchestra, Saturday,
Feb. 24; Van Cliburn, pianist, Fri-
day, Mar. 15; Toronto Symphony
Orchestra, Seiji Ozawa, conductor,
Thursday, Mar. 28.
Extra Series: "Land of Smiles,"
operetta by Franz Lehar, the ori-
ginal Viennese production starring
Guiseppe di Stefano, - Monday,
Sept. 25; Chicago Symphony Or-
chestra, Jean Martinon, conduc-
tor, Saturday, Sept. 30; Yomiur
Japanese Orchestra, Arthur Fied-
ler, conductor, Friday, Nov. 10;
National Ballet of Washington,
D.C., Wednesday, Jan. 24; Stock-
holm Philharmonic Orchestra, An-
tal Dorati -conductor, Friday,
Mar 8.
Chamber Arts Series: Chamber
Symphony of Philadelphia, Anshel
1rusilow, ' conductor, Saturday,

Oct..21; Berlin Philharmonic Oc-
tet Sunday, Nov. 5; Berliner Cam-
erata Musicale, Monday, Nov. 13;
Chicago Little Symphony, Thor
Johnson, conductor, Saturday,
Jan. 20; Music from Marlboro,
2:30 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 4; Munich'
Chamber Orchestra, Thursday,
Feb. 29; San Pietro Orchestra of
Naples, Friday, March 22. All con- ,
certs begin at 8:30 p.m. except
as noted.
Ticket orders may be placed now
at the office of the 'University
Musical -Society. Details regard-
ing ticket prices is available from
the society at Burton Tower, Ann
Arbor.

Speaker:

GORDON WAL ER

voices which seemed to permeate
the air. It took some time and
was a pleasure. to discover, tnat
the voices were actually the four
separate sections each sounding as
one voice. It was a memorable
moment.
Mozart's "V'amo di core" gave
Mr. Hemberg and the Chorus an
opportunity to demonstrate their
skill with three choirs distributed
across the stage.
During the remainder of the
pre-intermission section of the
performance the chorus moved
briefly through' the history of
choral music to the'contemporary
era. The music of Verdi, Debussy,
Krenek, Orff, and Seiber served
as examples.
Following the intermission the
group turned its attention to
Scandanavian choral works and
the result was much more pleas-
ing. Particularly delightful were
the Peterson-Berger arrangements
of the Danish "Stemning" and the
Norwegian "Dans! ropte Felen."

By LISSA MATROSS
When Arthur Miller spoke at
the University last month, he
noted rhetorically "It's easy to talk'
about the theatre today-we hard-
ly have any theatre today." He
then went on to say that the fu-
ture of American theatre would
be, hopefully, in repertoiy com-
panies like Lincoln Center in New
Yprk, or in traditionally non-r
theatre areas across the country.
The John Fernald Company of
the Meadow Brook Theatre in
nearby Rochester, Michigan, looks
like it might fulfill Miller's hopes.
Organized this fall under the
auspices of Oakland University,
the company has already pro-
duced "The Caucasian Chalk
Circle" by Bertold Brecht; Shake-
speare's "Love's Labour Lost;" and
George Bernard Shaw's "You
Never Can Tell." Their current
production, Jean Anouilh's "The
Waltz of the Toreadors," runs
through April 30.
Trained with Fernald
'The non-student company of

Fernald was principle at RADA everything in England that I've Andersen fairly tale done by Nich-
for ten years, during which time wanted to do. olas Stuart Gray.
he directed Peter Ustinov, Dame "Regional theatre outside of Fernald was born in California
Judith Anderson, Albert Finney New York City will become dom- but grew up in England and in the
and Susannah York. Ustinov term- inant and I want to be one of British theatre. He says that
ed Fernald's departure for the those who mold it." American talent is "enormous but

Director of Campus Crusade at Ohio State
Friday, April 7-7:30 P.M.
Alpha Omega Pi Sorority-800 Oxford Rd.

I

United States "saddening for Brit- Immediate Success
ain and another stroke of gra- The company's success has been
tuitous fortune for her powerful more than substantial-there were

ally."
Praised by Critics
London drama critics are almost
unanimous in proclaiming Fer-
nald's 1948 production of Che-
khov's "The Cherry Orchard," "the
finest ever presented."
Explaining his decision to leave
RADA and establish a repertory
company, Fernald says, "I've done
ANN ARBOR DANCE
THEATER CONCERT

6,000 subscriptions for the initial
season. The company has been
playing to 70 per cent capacity
audiences.
As in any repertory company,
versatility is one of the chief vir-
tues of the Fernald company. Over
Easter vacation they presented
,"The Imperial Nightingale," an
adaptation of the Hans Christian

lacks tradition and discipline."
Continuing, he notes, "Amer-
icans I've trained in England have
been terribly grateful in what
they've found there-and they
have flowered there."
Form Oakland Academy
Fernald is hopeful that Amer-
icans can flower in their own
country, too. Next fall an Academy
of Dramatic Arts will be formed at
Oakland in connection with the
Meadow Brook Theatre.

They're back !
singers SARA MELTON &
CHRISTOPHER DELOASH
! ! Friday and Saturday!
at the ARK
1421 Hill St. 9:00' P.M.

4

I

I

I

HILL AUD.-SUNDAY, APRIL 9
6:30 & 9:30-$3,00, $2.00
LIVE! IN PERSON LIVE!'
A NIGHT OF ANDY WARHOL
with
THE VELVET UNDERGROUND
THE NEW GENERATION

I

I

.. r...........

2ND
WEEK!

4-

DIAL
8-6416

"A superb, gripping film
tells a strong suspense story!"
-INGENUE Magazine

I

I

"VIVID AND
IMAGINATIVE., HIGHLY
ORIGINAL AND
THOUGHT-PROVOKING!"
Saturday Review
Juie Oskar
Christie 7ahreiihei: Werner
he /irt ot snc' 451"w~e o ~
her AcademyAward
for"Darling" TECHNICOLOR* Best Actor Crar'
A DENWKYAIEDRf4PRWOOcT "- A UNIVERSAL RELEASE
April 13th: "A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS"

-N
4

I

FILMS-BANDS-LIGHTS et a
BLOCK TICKETS AVAILABLE
TICKETS ON SALE: NO RESERVATIONS
TODAYVONTHE DIAG: 10-2
HILL AUD., FRIDAY-SUNDAY: 125
AT CINEMA GUILD: FRIDAY-SATURDAY

I

V

1'

M1.a*
E1 I y
N MJ +1+fN I
JC .
Y! 1 J"4ti
Ja. ,, '"
:x2 -
7;T.3 Jz
S clues

Shows of
1,'3, 5, 7 & 9 P.M.

Ii
ANy
ADVANCE
PREVIEW OF THE
EXCITING FEATURE
SOON TO BE SHOWN IN
ANN ARBOR,..
FILMED IN
COLOR & STARRING
PAUL NEWMAN ..
PLUS OUR
REGULAR
FEATURE
AT THE
TATE

w..=

STONIGHT*

mom"

u

5

NOW ENTER THEBIG
ACADEMY
AWARD
SWEEPSTAKES
PICK THE WINNERS OF
THIS YEAR'S "OSCARS"
nothing to buy .. .just complete and
sign this ballot, and drop it off at any
of the participating merchants.

DIAL 5-6290
FLINT'S BACK!.1

J..
AA

MASTER OF THE KISS...
KARATE AND KICKS...

ONCE
ONLY
AT
7:15 P.M.

:'
. , a

r. ...r%{fd '^:,,mt' sv44'' r

xs N

a

LAST DAYS!

*i

BEST PICTURE
Fl "Affie"
p "A Man For All Seasons
"The Russians Are'
Coming"
C] "The Sand Pebbles"
Q "Who's Afraid-Of
Virginia Woolf?"
* BEST ACTOR
Q Alan Arkin
E] Richard Burton
Q Michael Caine
Q Steve McQueent
F- Paul Scofield

CHECK ONE FOR EACH CATEGORY
BEST DIRECTOR
El Anton ioni--"Bl ow-Up"
ElLelouch-"A Man And
A Woman"
ElZinnemann-"A Man
For All Seasons"
El Brooks-"The
Prof essionalIs"
E Nichols-"Who's Afraid
Of Virginia Woolf?"
BEST ACTRESS
flAnouk Aimee
E Ida Kaminska
ElVanessa Redgrave
E Lynn Redgrove
E Elizabeth Taylor
pporting Role) - ACTRESS

p
" I

r000

THE ON&y
0)AAD1k~9fiJA8Jyc

ACTOR

(Su

0/1.

D
O'
0l
El

Moko
James Mason
Walter Matthau
George Segal
Robert Shaw

W ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
E "Blow-Up"
E "The Fortune Cookie"
El "Khartoumn"
El "A Man And A Woman"
El 'The Naked Prey"

C] Sandy Dennis
E Wendy Hiller
E Jocelyn Legarde
E Vivien Marchant
E Geraldine Page
MUSICAL SCORE
El " The Bible"
E "Born Free"
E "Hawaii"
El "The Sand Pebbles"
l "Who's Afraid Of
Virginia Woolf?"

Due to the "SNEAK"
Preview Tonight, PANA I'yRy
Feature Times Are:
1:00-3:00
5:00-9:15 .
SUNDAY
AwcGunnmm GlomkeLri da
This how tfgo
fismakacbaf



Join the
Psycho Sexua
Revolution
Petition now for positions of im-
mene imrnaear n nov on

Please print your name and address at the bottom
Contest closes at 6:00 P.M. MONDAY, APRIL 10, 1967

2Ot CENTURYFOX PRESENTS
The newr...4
-U

1t PRIZE: 8 passes EACH to the
Michigan, State, & Campus Theatres
9, 5 nominated sound-track LP's 4N

I i

- a - -m -a I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan