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April 02, 1967 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, APRIL 2, 1967

TUE MICHIG. I DAILY

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fit'

Jacob
Special To The Daily-
CARBONDALE, Ill. - The Wol-
verines' Dave Jacobs captured two
inividual titles,. and teammate
Wayne Miller added a second
place, as the 1967 NCAA gymnas-
tics championships came to a close
last night.
Friday night the Salukis of
Southern Illinois won the team
4 title with a score of 189.55, while
Michigan came in second with a
187.4.
Jacobs, only a sophomore, fine
ished first in the floor exercise
with 9.45 points to edge Sid Freu-
denstein of California, who had
9.425, and Kanti Allen of UCLA
with 9.30.

Takes

Two

NCAA

Crowns

Then, in the trampoline, Jacobs
again took the crown with an un-
believable score of 9.50 points.
"Dave was tremendous out there
tonight," enthused gymnastics
coach Newt Loken after the tour-
nament had been completed.
"What's even better," he con-
tinued, "is that-he's only a sopho-
more!''
But even better for the Wol-
verine squad was the tremendous
finish of Wayne Miller. Friday
night, the junior trampolinist was
third at the end of the team com-
petition. Last night, though, he
came thiough with a 9.350 to
take the runnerup position behind.
teammate Jacobs.

"Wayne was really great, top," fornia turned in an even more
bubbled the ecstatic Loken. "After fantastic 9.6.
being injured all season, he Michigan had mnother finalist
bounced back with outstanding in vaulting. Fred Rodney, who
performances in the tournament is also a sophomore, placed ninth
play, especially tonight, when he with a score of 9.05.
was under so much pressure." For six members of the Wol-
Steve Cohen of Penn State, who
took third in the parallel bars and
second on the rings, took all-
around honors. His score of 9.5 on
the rings, normally an unbelieva-
ble feat in itself, was bettered this
time when Josh Robinson of Cali-

verine squad, however, this is the
last time in the tourneys. Gary
Vandervoort, Cliff Chilvers, Chris
Vanden Broek, Art Baessler, and
Phip and Chip Fuller, all of them
seniors, closed out their college
careers with a flourish.

CrosDe,
In Rainy OV
Driving rain and mud combined
with the 'rugged Chicago La-
Crosse Club to defeat Michigan's
hopefuls, 9-8, in overtime yester-
day afternoon.
Despite the adverse weather,
"an impressive turnout" witness-
ed the match, according to Dave
Woycke, a member of the La-
Crosse Club.
The 'Crossers' face Michigan
State this afternoon at 41:30 on
South Ferry Field.
Buzz Lamb scored four times to
lead Michigan's attack yesterday,
but after grabbing a 1-0 lead, the
'Crossers' trailed most of the way.
The halftime score was 5-3,
Chicago, and it was 8-8 at the
end of regulation time.
The first eight minutes of the
ten minute overtime were score-
less but Chicago's Corrigan broke
the deadlock and won the game
with a well-placed shot late in the
overtime.
LaCrosse matches are played in
15 minute quarters and there are
ten men on. a side, including a
goalie, three defensemen, three
middlefieldmen, and three at-
tackers.
Other scorers for the Michigan
team included Bill ToomaiIan
with two, and George Humphries
and "Mugsie" Devock with one
apiece.

(eated, 9-8,
ertime Battle
For Chicago, May had 'three,
Cook and Batza two, and Thomas
and Corrigan one, Corrigan's
game winnig tally being his lone
marker of the afternoon.
For those interested in either
joining or following the Michigan
LaCrossers, last. week's issue of
Sports Illustrated carried an ar-
ticle on the rising interest in La-
Crosse throughout the East and
Midwest. The next edition of the
Huron Valley Ad-Visor, a local-
advertising journal, will carry a
feature article on the Michigan
squad.
Those interested in joining may
contact co-captains Chris Alter
and. Bob Gillon or coaches Bob
Fleischmen or Bob DiGiovanni.
Following the Michigan State
match, the 'Crossers' havena home
date with Bowling Green on April
5, next Wednesday.
The LaCrosse schedule for the
remainder of the season is as
follows:

East Stars Win'
Hoop Classic'
LEXINGTON, Ky. (P)-Sonny
Dove, of St. John's, led the East
to 'a 102-93 victory yesterday aft-
ernoon in the East-West College
All-Star basketball game.
Dove, who was named Star of
Stars in the game, hit 13 of 21
shots from the field for 26 points
and hauled down 13 rebounds.
Pat Riley of Kentucky added 17,
points for ,the East, Bob Lewis of
North Carolina had 12 and Ron
Widby of Tennessee and Bob Ver-
ga of Duke got 10 apiece.
Jamie Thompson of Wichita
State, led the West with 114
points, while Tom Workman of
Seattle and Gary Gray of Okla-
homa City added 13 each.
The East connected on 40 of 901
shots from the field while theI
West hit 35 of 90.

As Loken commented, "It's a
great way to end the season, with
the fine team finish and the
showings of Jacobs and Miller.
The team really came back after
the defeat by Iowa in the regionals
and the loss in the Big Tens."
NBA
St. Louis at San Francisco (inc)
NHL
Montreal 5, Chicago 4
Toronto 5, New York 1
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
East All-Stars 102, West All-Stars 93
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Atlanta 6, Minnesota 1
Cincinnati 3, St. Louis 0
Kansas City 8, Washington 3
New York (N) 6, Philadelphia 3
Chicago (A) 5, Detroit 0
Baltimore 3, Pittsburgh 1
Chicago (N) 6, California 0
Boston 13, New York (A) 4
Houston 7, Los Angeles 0
San Francisco vs. Cleveland (can-
celled, wet grounds)
PAUL CAMELET
tailor
1 103 S. University
above drug store
663-4381

(Paid Political Advertisement)

i

I
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YPSILANTI STATE HOSPITAL
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Dave Jacobs

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CH!CAGO PUBLIC SCHOOLS ANNOUNCES
EXAMINATIONS FOR
HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES,
Examination: Sat., April 29, 1967
Filing Deadline: Wed., April 5, 1967 NOON, C.S.T.
TITLES OF EXAMINATIONS
Art (7-12), Accounting, Business Training, English,
Mathematics, Physical Education (MEN, WOMEN, Gr.
4-8) , Biology, General Science, Geography, History, Li-
brary Science (7-12), Auto Shop, Drafting,.Electric Shop,
Machine Shop, Wood Shop, Industrial Arts (7-12).
FOR INFORMATION: Board of Examiners
Chicago Public Schools-Room624
228 N. LaSalle Street--Chicago, Illinois 60601
or: Director of Teacher Recruitment, Room 1005
Chicago Public Schools
or: Placerrpent Office
Join The Daily Sports Staff
, r
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I

CONTINUE ANN ARBOR'S
"ALL AMERICAN"
REPUBLICAN LEADERSHIP.,.
a" DOUG
REPUBLICAN
COUNCILMAN
SECOND WARD
VOTE MONDAY APRIL rd,
CONTINUE DOUGLAS D. CRARY on Council
VISION * COURAGE * EXPERIENCE
~th
(By the author of "Rally Round the Flag, Boys!",
"Dbe Giti,"'e}
WHO'S GOT THE BUTTON?
I'm sure it has not escaped your notice that underlying
the adorable whimsy which has made this columi such a
popular favorite among my wife and my little dog Spot,
there is a serious attempt to stay abreast of the 'problems
that beset the American college student.
Many a trip have I made to many a campus-talking to
undergraduates, listening to their troubles, hearing their
grievances, reading their buttons. (Incidentally, the seo-
ond and third most popular buttons I saw on my last trip
were: "WALLACE BEERY LIVES" and "FLUORI-
DATE MUSCATEL." The first most popularbutton was,
as we all know, "SCRAP THE SCRAPE" which is worn,
as we all know, by Personna Super Stainless Steel Blade
users who, as we all know, are proud to proclaim to the
world that they have found a blade which gives them
luxury shave after luxury shave, which comes both in
double-edge style and Injector style, which does indeed
scrap the scrape, negate the nick, peel the pull, and oust
the ouch, which shaves so closely and quickly and truly
and beautifully that my heart leaps to tell of it. (If per-
haps you think me too effusive about Personna, I ask you
to remember that to me Personna is more than just a
razor blade; it is also an employer.)
But I digress. I make frequent trips, as I say, to learn
what is currently vexing the American updergraduate.
Last week, for example, while visiting a prominent Eas-
tern university (Idaho State) I talked to a number of
engineering seniors who posed a serious question. Like
all students, they had come to college burning to fill them-
selves with culture, but, alas, because of all their science
requirements, they simply had had no time to take the
liberal arts courses their young souls lusted after. "Ar
we doomed," they asked piteously, "to go through life
uncultured?"
I answered with a resounding "No!" I told them the
culture they had missed in college, they would pick up
after graduation. I explained that today's enlightened
corporations are setting up on-the-job liberal arts pro-
grams for the newly employed engineering graduate-
courses designed to fill his culture gap-for the truly eti-
lightened corporation realizes that the truly cultured em-
ployee is the truly valuable employee.
To illustrate, I cited the well-known case of Champert
Sigafoos of Purdue.
When Champert, having completed his degree in wing
nuts and flanges, reported to the enlightened corporation
where he had accepted employment, he was not rushed
forthwith to a drawing board. He was first installed in

the enlightened corporation's training campus. Here he
was given a beanie, a room-mate, and a copy of the com-
pany rouser, and the enlightened corporation proceeded
to fill the gap in his culture.
First he was taught to read, then to print capital let-
ters, then capital and small letters. (There was also an
attempt to teach him script, but it was ultimately
abandoned.)
From these fundamentals, Champert progressed slowly
' but steadily through the more complex disciplines. He
was diligent, and the corporation was patient, and in the
Pnd t-hp~v wprP wt-11 ir'ua wA dA fnr.wheI, n Chla i,' i-

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