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April 02, 1967 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAIGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, APRIL 2, 1967

PAGE SIX TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, APRIL 2, 1967

IT'S A GAS

ttIN THE PRESIDENT'S
AND MY OPINION..."
by Donald Pearce
Illustrated by Arnold Roth
An uproarious collection of hip and
heady reflections on life, love and the
~, i: 1 "scene" from the heartfelt prose of
hundreds of college students-who
shall remain nameless. Would you be-
lieve: "Remember that Snow White
was living with those dwarfs, is that
innocent?" Want more? Get it!
at your College Bookstore. $2.95
Englewood Cliffs, N.J.
En w o--------- ----

'Speed
By BOB LEES
Though Avis-Rent-a-Car might
not agree, it's kind of tough being
number two. Especially if you're
a wrestler, and more especially if
it happens three consecutive
times.
Bob Fehrs, captain of this year's
NCAA-runnerup Wolverine squad,
has found himself in the finals of:
that tournament for the past three
years. Each time he has come up
against Mike Caruso, Lehigh's 123-
pound king. And each time, it has
been the easterner who has grab-
bed the top spot.
"It's kind of disheartening," ad-
mits the Wolverine senior-and
with good reason. After losing by
scores of only 8-5 and 9-6 the first
two times, the peppery Michigan
grappler fought Caruso on even

ressiven ness

terms this year-only to lose 7-6
on a riding time point.
"Actually," laughs Fehrs, "I did
beat him once-after a fashion.
When I was a senior in high
school in 1963, I wrestled at 120
pounds in the nttional prep school
tournaments at Lehigh, while
Mike entered at 112. We both won
in our divisions, but I got the out-
standing wrestler award."
Crowning Glories
And awards were plentiful in
the high school wrestling arena
for the Michigan mat star.
Though born in Grove City, Penn-
sylvania, he grew up in, and wres-
teld for, an orphanage in Hershey,
Pa. Three times he advanced to
the finals of the national preps,
gaining victories in his junior and
senior years. Yet he was never
eligible for the state title.
"Technically, we were consider-
ed a private school," recalls Fehrs.
"Since Pennsylvania allowed only
public schools to compete in her
state tournaments, our only outlet
beyond the local level was at
Lehigh."
Yet Fehrs was not a one-sport
athlete in his years in Chocolate
Town, as he gained a letter in
football. But here he found his
size a handicap-for a while, at
least.
"Our football coach in my soph-
omore and junior years had a
mania for size," he remembers, "If
you weighed less than 160 pounds
he didn't even look at you. But
in our senior year, we had a
change of coaches, and I sudden-
ly found myself first string quar-
terback.
"Of course," he adds hastily,
"we had basically a running style
game."
Big Wheel
Besides directing his team that
year to a 6-3 record and winning
the wrestling crowns, Fehrs also
found time'to participate in Youth
Forum, a student government-type

practice," says Fehrs. "It s actual
ly just a reaction to what th
other guy does. Some members o
our squad could try it, but they'r
afraid of getting caught under
neath. It just takes quick reac
tions and a sense of timing.'
And Fehrs has parlayed these
qualities into three Big Ten cham-
pionships, a Midlands crown asa
sophomore, and top spot at the
Wilkes-Barre Invitational this sea
son, in addition to those damn-

Felirs
- Fehrs has even more reason to
e be happy with the outcome, for
f the results may be a harbinger of
e his upcoming job-assistant wres-
- tling coach at the University of
- Pittsburgh, a former power now
in the rebuilding process.
e -I just found out about it last
- week," Fehrs declares. "I'd like
a to make coaching my profession,
e and this is a great opportunity."
- Grappling Duties
- But there are other wrestling

able runners-up to Caruso in tne duties awaiting the
nationals. And as captain, he saw for before making the journey
"his" squad go farther than most e a Alona with Kamman

MICHIGAN WRESTLING CAPTAIN BOB FEHRS rides his op-
ponent en route to an overtime victory in the quarterfinals of the
NCAA wrestling championships. The Wolverine senior ended an-
other brilliant season by finishing second in the finals for the
third time.

observers expected.
"Bob was a great captain this
year," commented fellow wrestler
Burt Merical. "We all liked him,
and his own ability caused us to
try harder."
But Fehrs demurs. "All I really
did officially as captain was to
lead the team in calisthenics," he
laughs.
Proud
Yet he is proud of the squad,
and proud of the captaincy. "The
title doesn't bring with it much
in the way of duties, but .ft is an
honor, in that the guys think that
in some ways you're above aver-
age.
"And I was really happy this
year with the way they performed,
particularly at the Nationals," he
continues. "We only carried eight
out of a possible eleven weights,
but just about everyone came
through."

and Dave Porter, Fehrs will take
part in the East-West all-star
meet at Stillwater. Oklahoma, this
weekend. And this summer he
hopes to hold a few wrestling clin-
ics of his own.
But until then, Bob is getting
"in shape" for his Pittsburgh job
by wearing a floppy piraterhat
with an "M" across the front.
"Actually." he admits, "it hides
my scalp, which is showing
through more and more each
year."
Fehrs, however, doesn't have to
worry about hiding, and his future
employers don't have to worry
about him wanting the chance to
work.
After all, when you're number
two, you try harder.
And especially when you're Bob
Fehrs, you don't stop until you're
on top.

I

organization founded by former
President Eisenhower. This group
sent representatives annually from
regions in Pennsylvania, New Jer-
sey, and surrounding areas to
Washington each year, but Bobby
never got to go.
"But I was a 'Cabinet member'
from my area," he admits. "This
kind of made me a big wheel at
the school.
"Actually, I enjoyed life in high
school," he continues, "especially
because wrestling was so impor-
tant there. The only trouble was
that it was an all-guys' school."
When Fehrs came to Michigan,
he immediately impressed all who
saw him with his extremely ag-
gressive style of play.
"I've always tried to take the
offensive from the start," he de-
clares. "Once the other guy starts
to back off, you've got it made,

because he's reduced to playing
defense. Some guys on our squad,
like Jim Kamman, can use a de-
fensive game to their advantage,
but I like to charge right in at
the beginning and let the guy
know I'm ready for him."
And once Fehrs engages his
man, the action is always lively.
His favorite hold, the "guillotine,"
makes it look as if his opponent
is being stretched out on the rack.
His best crowdpleaser, though, is
an almost unnamable ploy which,
for lack of better term, he dubs
"going out the back door."
In this move, Fehrs has been
taken down, and his opponent is
riding him, -when suddenly Bob
performs a lightning-fast wriggle,
slithers through his man's legs,
and is on top for a two-point re-
versal.
"This is something I really can't

t

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By ANDY BARBAS
Neither rain, nor snow, nor .. .
While the rain didn't stop yes-
terday's football scrimmage, it did
keep the ball on the ground, as the
Wolverines conducted a rather
limited practice.
Even though most of the prac-
tice consisted of running plays,
Coach Bump Elliott felt "the prac-
tice had gone pretty well." The
weather, though, meant that the
offense couldn't open up, making
it hard to judge the quality of
play.
The linemen were probably the
easiest to watch, and Coach El-
liott concluded that "the line play
looked reasonably good. We are
starting to find out just where the
players belong." The offense and
defense lines are the most experi-
enced part of the team, with six
of the interior starting linemen
returning.
Pretty Good
The offensive backfield "looked
as good as they possibly could
under the playing conditions," El-

liott noted, "though nit's pretty
hard to judge their effectiveness
when they aren't able to throw the
ball very much."
John Gabler, freshman halfback
prospect from Royal Oak Kinball,
was able to participate in the
scrimmage after sitting out last
week's because of an injured
shoulder. Ernie Sharpe, a junior,
is returning at one halfback, and
both Gabler and sophomore George
Hoey are being tried at the other
spot.
Another, freshman, Jim Man-
dich, is being considered for the
fullback spot, replacing the grad-
uating Dave Fisher.
Question Mark
The defensive backfield, with
only Dennis Morgan returning
from last year's star-studded crew,
is generally acknowledged as the
Wolverine's biggest question mark;
and Elliott was hoping to find
some answers this afternoon. He
especially hoped to get a good look
at freshman prospects Brian
Healy and Cecil Pryor.
But the weather again put a
crimp in the coaches' plans, as the
lack of passing in the scrimmage
allowed the linebackers no op-
portunity to display their pass-
defending abilities.

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