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March 30, 1967 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-30

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THURSDAY. MARCH 30, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAII.V

aHRSAYaMRC 3, 98 Tr MTa WuTiaa1ir Ai .L

PAGr NThIE

Grayle Howlett
OFF BASE
On Sports Heroes
And Rule Changes
The accomplishments of the so-called sports hero are merely
statistics--Just future copy for those Vitalis ads. A sports hero
in my eyes has to really leave his mark on a sport.
One such hero is Roger Maris. Not because he clubbed 61 home
runs and some assorted sportswriters along the way in 1961, but
because he introduced the asterisk to baseball. It must have been a
solemn meeting indeed when Ford Frick decided to preserve the
memory of Babe Ruth by naming Roger Maris the greatest asterisk
hitter of all time.
Now you can add one more to the list-Lew Alcindor, the
idol of every 7'1" kid in the country. Lew just led his UCLA
Bruins to a 30-0 season and an NCAA championship. But this
doesn't give him the hero tag. Instead, give him the nod on the
rule he just introduced to college and high school basketball-
no more dunking.
Bill Fleming, former Michigan man and now the basketball
voice for Sports Network, talked a lot about how Alcindor intimidated
his opponents at the NCAA tourney. That was nothing compared to
what he must have done to the guys who make up the National
Basketball Committee of the United States and Canada. The meeting
must have gone something like this:
Rulemaker No. 1: "Jeez, did you see that game the other
night between the Bruins and Dayton? That was the greatest
ad we ever ran for college football. We get the whole nation
watching and not one overtime. I could feel the whole nation
switching over to Miss Teen-Age International when Alcindor
started yawning after the first five minutes."
Rulemaker No. 2: "I'll tell you another thing. We got two
more years of this. Let's face it, this past season did nothing for
basketball. We've got to stop Alcindor and put an end to the
gimmicks clubs use against him. I know-we'll legislate. Cut
out dunking and throw in the old dodge about injuries. Gentle-
men, we've just saved basketball."
While the basketball committee has taken the initial action, it
seems that some other sports could take the cue. For example, base-
ball has produced a paucity of .300 hitters in the past few years, so
why not ban the fast ball. Anything, in the umpire's judgment, over
65 mph would be illegal.
College football? A lot of improvement could be used here.
Alabama has dominated the sport too long. So, let's cut out
157-lb. linebackers who run the 100 in nine flat.
Pro football could be improved. To neutralize the team that has
a kicker who can boot them through the parking lot, the pros ought
to pass stricter immigration laws.
This year the Chicago Black Hawks have made a shambles of
the NHL race, alienating fans who like the close race all over the
country. To stop the high scoring Black Hawks and Bobby Hull,
put an end to the slap shot.
Because Bob Seagren makes the pole vault a foregone con-
clusion in every meet he enters the track rulemakers should
pass a new law taking away the foam rubber in the pit. That
would save the sport.
These suggestions make just about as much sense as banning
the dunk. After all, if you're going after one man or one team, do it
right. When the Yankees were dominating the American League for
all those'years everybody was talking about breaking them up, but
nobody believed in doing it. It was kind of a way for the other teams
to gloss over their inadequacies.
But when UCLA clearly showed their superiority over any other
college cage team and the promise of future superiority, the rules
committee decided to legally break up the Bruins the best way they
could.
One of the reasons given for outlawing the dunk was "to
"equalize the offense and defense and to give each team similar
privileges underneath the basket."
Now the idea of sports is to equalize the teams. I suppose that's
why they schedule the NCAA tournament each year, just to find out
who's most equal. And as for the major "reason" for banning the
dunk-the fact that improper dunking can cause injuries-it seems
that rules committee could find a better cause, like the prevention
of athlete's foot.
That's the way it is, Lew. It looks like they're trying another
way to stop you. Instead of making you look at a four-man sag or
the air slowly being let out of the ball, they're going to throw the
rule book at you.
Abe Lemons figured the only way to stop you was using
poison or a gun. You know, that way's more ethical.

. - --

Rookie
By PHIL BROWN
Nine Conference championships
in 12 years is an enviable record
-a record, however, which can
only be envied by the other nine
schools comprising the Big Ten
when it comes to tennis compe-
tition.

Netters Lead 'M' Bid

to

Retain

Title

Michigan netters have missed
bringing home first-place honors
only three times since copping the
crown in 1954, and have won in
each of the last two years.
Despite his squad's back-to-
back pre-season losses to the Uni-
versity of Miami, Michigan coach
Bill Murphy is optimistic about
chances for a third consecutive
title. "The boys are looking good,"
said Murphy. "But we must be
stronger to win as easily as we
did last year."
Repeat Race
Jerry Stewart, this year's team
captain, teamed up with Karl
Hedrick to win the number-one
doubles crown as Michigan finish-
ed with a 25 point margin over
runner-up Michigan State in 1966.
The Spartans should again be the
prime hurdle in the Wolverines'
quest for '67 honors.
The losses to Miami were dis-
appointing, but were not a major
cause for concern on the part of
the netters. "We would have done
much better if we had had more
time to get used to playing out-
doors again," commented sopho-
more Brian Marcus. "We had only
three days to work outside. Play-

ing indoors you lose the feeling
for the wind, and it takes time to
get it back."
Murphy took advantage of the
Florida trip to, juggle the line-up
which will play in conference
competition. The Wolverines look-
ed good in the first of the two
meets, losing 6-3 to a very strong
Miami squad.
Two close singles matches spell-
ed the difference between winning
and losing, as both Dick Dell and
Pete Fishback dropped squeakers.
Pseudo-Loss
Miami, third-place finisher in
the 1966 NCAA tennis champion-
ships, prevailed in the second
meeting 7-2, as Murphy revised
his line-up to give each player
e'perience against a new oppo-
nent.
Marcus, Dell and Fishback make
up a trio of sophomores that will
carry a large part of the Wolver-
ine title hopes into the regular
season. And all show promise of
continuing the winning tradition
established by Michigan n e t
squads in the past. Fishback lost
frustrating three-set losses to both
Jaimie Fillol and Frank Tutvin,
the Miami version of the "one-two
punch."

Fillol is recognized as one of the
finest amateur tennis players in
the country, and defeated Fish-
back 8-6, 4-6, 6-4, in a hard-
fought match.
Bright Future
Both Dell and Marcus partici-
pated in the Western Indoor Open
held in Cleveland the last week-
end in February, and their per-
formances provide a bright note
for the future of tennis at Mich-
igan.
In a field of top amateurs from
all over the country, both Wol-
verines reached the semi-finals.

Dell lost to Clark Graebner,
ranked third in the country, in
straight sets, 6-2, 6-3.
Marcus, a Michigan high school
standout two years ago, faced
Arthur Ashe, the top-ranked ama-
teur in the country in his semi-
final match. Ashe won, but Mar-
cus made a fine showing in his
6-3. 7-5 loss.
Irish Too
Michigan will face Notre Dame
and Western Michigan in addi-
tion to the regular Western Con-
ference opponents during the 1967
season. The Wolverine netters are
already looking ahead to the
NCAA championship tournament
to be held June 12-18. First, how-

ever, cones the matter of the Big
Ten meet which will take place
May 18-20.
Worth noting is the fact that
the Big Ten tourney will be held
in Ann Arbor, It's especially nice
to wina t ,home,
Billboard
* :
All wrestling letter - winners
are to report for a brief meet-
ing at 3:15 today in the wrestl-
ing room of the IM Building.

SCORES

I

F4
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Houston 3, Atlanta 2
New York (N) 5, Cincinnati 3
Los Angeles 3, Kansas City 2
Detroit 6, Philadelphia 2
Pittsburgh 6, Chicago (A),4 (10 inn)
Boston 10, St. Louis 9
Minnesota 5, Washington
Cleveland 2, California 1
San Francisco vs. Chicago (N) at
Scottsdale, Ariz. (canceled, rain)
NHL
New York 10, Detroit 5

Presenting a Friday series on .
THE IMAGE OF MAN
March 31: "The Image of Man in the Scriptures"
-The Rev. Ernest T. Campbell
First Presbyterian Church
April 7: "The Image of Man as a Restless Believer"
r --Fr. Michael Donavan, Chaplain,
Newman Student Association
April 14: "The Image of Man in Modern Literature"
-The Rev. Gordon Jones,
St. Andrews Episcopal Church
7:30 P.M.
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER, 1432 Washtenaw
(Dinner 6:30 Reservations 662-3580)

I... ____________________________________________________

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Join The Daily Sports Staff

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" :tiff ".1 . : 'A1". .1 r:'":" ":titi"::'rr:4 1". y. .
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CQ

The University of Michigan
CENTER FOR
CONTINUING EDUCATION
OF WOMEN

INVITES all women-returning women over
25, part-tine 'women students, and wives of
students, to the third in a series of four Dis-
cussion Coffees on "Wonen tn School and at
Work." t-~
Discussion Leaders:
HELEN FRITZ (Mrs. Irving)
Teaching fellow working toward Ph.D. in Sociology

: ;
G
?:
{
:

S PE CIAL PAS SBOOKI
TIME SA VINGS PLAN

I

annual rate
o monthsI
maturity
$500 or more
automatically
renewable

If you have funds which are not now
earning this higher rate, we'll be glad
to help you transfer them to the new
Pass-book plan. Stop in at any, Ann
Arbor Bank office.

JANET SOUTHWOOD (Mrs. Kenneth)--
Completed M.A. in Adult Education in December 1966
Thursday, March 30, 8:00-10:00 P.M.
RACKHAM BUILDING, West Conference Room
Phone- 764-0449, 764-6555

..

,UNION-LEAGUE

CREATIVE ARTS COMMITTEE
Announces
Petitioning for Central Committee
of Creative Arts Festival
Petitions available 2nd floor Union
March 29-April 5
THINK CREATIVELY

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THE MARLIN JACKET
is a brawny but sleek-cut
to seafaring shape in
WASH'N'WEAR WHALER
CLOTH (a hefty cotton poplin).
Then the shell is treated for
SHOWER-REPELLENCY. It's
styled by PETERS, with raglan
shoulders, knit English collar,
umbrella yoke, and plaid lining.
In British tan, natural, or navy.
Regular sizes 36 to 46 at $12.
..long sizes 38 to 46 (not
available in British tan) at $13.
OUR ARBORLAND STORE OPEN
EVERY EVENING TO 9 P.M.

U
U

I

11

Roaring 20's Party

FRIDAY, March 31
8:30 P.M. $1.00 P

Music by
THE CHESSMEN
CHARLESTON CONTEST
-TROPH IES-

11

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