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March 30, 1967 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-30

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PAGE EIGHT

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 1967

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 1967

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UNION-LEAGUE

ANNOUNCING
Homecoming '67
CENTRAL COMMITTEE

SPECIAL EVENTS
Alan Washner
Lori Shingleton
PARADE
Robert Abrams
Barbara Neuman
PUBLICITY
Robert Albertson
Sandy Lee Driggin
BOOKLET
W. Marshall Slocum
Valerie Cavin

FLOATS & DISPLAYS
Harold Phillips
Barbara Robinson
ENTERTAINMENT
Gay Blanchard
Mike Sternberg
GRAPHICS
Jim Tishler
Kathleen Kennedy
TICKETS
Peter Benedek
Sue Cooper

ALUMNI RELATIONS
James Fisher
Anna Sophocles
SECRETARY
Laurel Davidson
TREASURER
Wayne Miller

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By FRED LaBOUR
If the Michigan golf team
proved anything in the Miami In-
vitational last weekend, it was
that golf is a mental as well as
a physical game.
Take John Schroeder as an ex-
ample. At the end of 63 holes of
tournament play, Schroeder was
two strokes behind Bob Melnyk of
Florida. The rest of the field was
strung out far behind the leaders.
Then, on the par five eleventh
hole, Schroeder elected too much

club for his second shot andI
smashed into terrible luck. Coach
Bert Katzenmeyer described what
happened. "John knew he had to
get a four on the hole if he was
ever going to catch Melnyk. His
drive was well-placed and he
seemed to be in excellent shape.
And then....
"His next shot, a three iron
landed to the right of the green
and rolled up against an out-of-
bounds fence leaving him with an
unplayable lie. By the time he'd
dropped the ball out, wedged up

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RETURN TO LINKS:
1' Golfers Work Out Kinks

Rule Change Limits Pro
Draft in College Baseball

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Don,'t MssTh is hne
Your last opportunity
to become a
STUDENT
SESQU ICENTENNIAL
ESCORT
come to the
ASS MEETING
Tonight
7:00 P.M.
Rooms 3R & S
MICHIGAN UNION
......N- E G
UN ION-LEAGUE

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The Dept. of Romance Languages
presents
Jean Giraudoux'
INTERMEZZO
(in French)
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Wednesday, March 29, 8:00 P.M.
Thursday, March 30, 8:00 P.M.
Tickets: $1.00, $2.00 at Box Office

to the green, and putted out, he
had a six.
"Melnyk came through with a
birdie and this was the turning
point. The hole seemed to drain
John's resources and he lost his
sharpness."
Melnyk capitalized on Schroed-
er's bad luck on later holes also
by playing conservative golf and
finished 10 strokes ahead of him.
"We were just not ready for.
that caliber of tournament play,"
stated Katzenmeyer. "You've got
to remember that last week was
the first time we've played out-
side this year. We just haven't had
enough time to develop the finesse
and confidence you need to win."
The team's main problem seemed
to be a lack of consistency, a fault
that should be remedied as the
golfers are able to get a little more
tournament play behind them.
According to Katzenmeyer, the
most "graphic example" of this
inconsistency appeared in the play
of Rod Sumpter. Sumpter's scores
fluctuated between a red-hot 70
and the high 80's.
Captain Bob Barclay was not
left out of the problem bag as
he developed a frustrating shank.
"Bob spent hours on the practice
tee, trying to overcome his shank
the only way you can: by hitting
hundreds of golf-balls," said Kat-
zenmeyer. "It paid off, too, as his
game showed a definite improve-
ment."
Coach Katzenmeyer refused to
put much stock in his team's
eighth place finish saying, "There's
a lot more in this golf team than
showed down there. We thought
we had a very good chance of
catching both Rollins and Ohio
State and finishing .in sixth
place." Rollins ended up three
shots up on the Wolverines and
the Buckeyes seven.

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By YVONNE COLVARD
"What a team we could have
with Reed, Cmejrek and Schryer."
This was baseball coach Moby
Benedict's reaction to the new
major league draft rule that ar-
rived too late to salvage three top
Wolverine players.
The rule, effective Sept. 1, states
that each incoming freshman
player will be ineligible to sign pro
contracts until he completes his
college eligibility or becomes 21
years of age, whichever comes
first.
Under the present draft law,
diamondmen may accept major
league offers in their sophomore
years. relinquishing their college
eligibility. An athlete, signing a
pro contract, gives up his amateur
standing in college ball.
Three Leave
Bob Reed, Wolverine pitcher for
the past two seasons, led, the Big
Ten conference last year in games
won with six. The righthander,
signed with Detroit Tigers in his
sophomore year and is waiting for
graduation this April before leav-
ing for the Tiger farm.
This season's captain, Dick
Schryer, accepted a Los Angeles
Dodger offer, leaving tie center-
field vacant.
Carl Cmejrek signed in 1965
when he led the Big Ten in hit-
ting with a .453 average. Coach
Benedict was bitter about the out-
fielder from Flint because he
wasn't consulted until after Cme-
jrek had signed with the Minne-
sota Twins.
"I don't mind the boys signing,
that much," admits Benedict. "It's
when they don't talk to me before-
hand that gets me mad!"
All three men are awaiting April
graduation before migrating to
their respective training camps.
The present draft rule places three'
prospective college all-stars in the

CARL CMEJREK

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stands instead of the dugout.
The new draft rule does not
affect any player currently en-
rolled in college. Sophomore play-
ers may still sign. But in the fall,
and once enrolled in a college, the
player will remain intact until at
least his junior year according to
the new rule.
If a 20-year-old senior becomes
21 in January or February, he may
not go through the December
draft but must wait until the June
draft.
"So we'll have him for his sen-
ior year," explains Coach Bene-
dict.
"Players may still be drafted
out of high school, though. But
this rarely happens."
Because of the draft alone,
Coach Benedict had to fill five
vacancies on this year's team with
sophomores and shifting of vet-
eran fielders.
The new draft law comes as
manna from heaven to the Wol-
verine diamond. Now the coaches
may spend their time consolidat-
ing rather than shifting.

HILLEL DELI HOUSE
MEET THE EDITOR
Roger Rapoport

Sunday at 5:30 P.M.
ail 663-4129 for Reservationos
$1.00 members $1 .25 others

RAMBLIN'
JACK ELLIOT

1429 HILL STREET

ALL WELCOME

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Fri., Sat., Sun.

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The sunroof works even when there
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Lovin' Spoonful-Best
* The Electric Prunes Album
* Gimme Some Lovin'-
-Spencer Davis Group
* The Velvet Underground'
and Nico

300 S. STATE
STEREO
* Rolling Stones-
Between the Buttons
* San Francisco's
Grateful Dead
* Endless Summer-St--
The Sandals

When you slide back the sunroof on a Volks-
wagen Station Wagon, the sky's the limit.
That's because odd-shaped loads you'd have
trouble fitting into an ordinary station wagon can
stick up out of a VW. Like a tree. Or a refrigerator.
(in fact, you never know what might pop up.)
And even when the sunroof's closed, the Volks-
wagen still gives you almost twice as much space
as other wagons.
And a 4' by 4' door that lets you get right at all
the room inside. (You don't have to be an engin-
eer to move big, bulky loads in and out.)
And whenever you don't want to put big things
inside your VW, you can use it for big people in-
stead. It seats 9 of them and holds 13 pieces of
luggage. All at once.
Other wagons only hold about half as much as
a VW. Even if you hit the ceiling.
But after the VW's all filled up, you can still go

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DR. ZHIVAGO-Soundtrack
A MAN AND A WOMAN-Soundtrack
* FREAK-OUT-MOTHERS OF INVENTION

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