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March 30, 1967 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-30

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY. MARCH 20. 1967

PAGE TWO THE MICIHGAN DAILY

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F

THEATRE
Odd Ciope: High Level Comedy

U' Players Announce.7

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I"iniIQ

4

Spring-Summer Bill

w . ~ ~ . *. .-..,. ,n;:_.., '_

By STEVEN ZARIT
Neil Simon's "The Odd Couple"
takes the old idea of two divorcees
turned out on their own and
creates a very funny evening of
brash humor.
The two divorcees are two
paunchy, middle-aged men, who
find themselves freed of the cares
and bords of marriage. The play
opens as Oscar (Harvey Stone)
aecides to take in his life-long
f ;end Felix (Lyle Talbot), when
relix's wife throws him out. The
bachelor apartmen, however, soon
turns into the mismatched 'niar -
i ,age" of two lonelv men.
Oscar, a cigar-smoking sports
V iter, :i,.w' in a morass of e.mrw ty
beer cans ashes and three-week
old sandwiches before Felix moved
in. He is a first Mass slob,. but

enjoys it thoroughly, huffing and
puffing his way through the eight
room apartment his wife left him
with.
Felix on the other hand, is
weak, weepy and a compu'sive
hypochondriac. Once wnen he was
locked accidently in a john over-
night, he wrote his entire will on
half a roll of toilet paper.
Felix is also compulsively clean.
When he moves in, he promises to
help with the "little things around
the house." He begins cooking and
cleaning, becoming a nagging
housewife, who follows Oscar
around with a dustrag and nags
him when he does not call to say
he will be late for dinner. In
despair Oscar screams, "Two sin-
gle men in an eigrit room apart-
ment shouldn't have an apartment

cleaner than my mother."
"The Odd Couple' was orig-nal-
ly directed by Mike Nichols; in
this production it is by Danny
Simon. The direction keeps a raoid
pace which saves the bad jokes
and makes the good one's funnier.
There are very few spots where the
play drags, and there are many
funny bits, like when Felix tries
to light a girl's cigarette, only to
get the cigarette caught in the
lighter.
Much of the success of the play
comes from the performances. Lyle
Talbot and Harvey Stone mug
and gambol qite well as hus-
band and "wife" of this odd cou-
ple. The brash Oscar is reduced
pathetically to pleading, "You
leave little notes on my pillow. I
told you never to leave little notes
on my pillow." And the weak Fe-
lix, always ready with the appro-
priate pout or whine, moans, "I
don't want to discuss it anymore.
I'm going to scrub the pots and
wash my hair."
The supporting cast of four mar-
ried poker players and'two flighty
English girls who find Felix cute
and cuddly keep the rapid. pace
with good performances.
When the situation may ring
true to many apartment dwellers,
the play could not be accused of
having any particular relevance.
It is situation comedy at a very
high level of action and wit. It
does not pretend to be more than
that, and accomplishes its pur-
pose with a very enjoyable mix-
ture of fun and farce.

THURSDAY, MARCH 30

The University Players has an-.
nounced the Spring-Summer Play-
bill for 1967-a season of four
plays and a musical comedy run-
ning the months of June through
August in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
Included in the 1967 Spring-
Summer offerings will be "The
Playboy of the Western World,"
the classic Irish comedy by John
Synge; "Macbeth;" "The Physi-
cist," an avant garde and bizarre
drama by Friedrich Duerrenmatt;
"The Country Wife," a Restora-
tion comedy by William Wycher-
ly; and "Little Mary Sunshine,"
a musical satire with book, lyrics
and score by Rick Besoyan.
"The Playboy of the Western i
World" will lead off the season,
running Wednesday through Sun-
day, May 31-June 4. Perhaps the
greatest Irish comedy of all, the
show will be under the direction
of Robert E. McGill. It probes
deeply into the way in which il-
lusions-romantic or otherwise-
can often become reality. Synge
uses some of the most delicious
language ever penned, and he
treats a situation of seriousness'
with a beautifully light touch.
"Macbeth" will play Wednes-
day through Sunday, June 28-
July 2, under the direction of
Prof. Richard J. Burgwin.
Duerrenmatt's "The Physicists"
combines all the elements of a

dramatic cliffhanger with the 7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
deeper aspects of the avant garde Guild will present Luis Bunnel's
movement. Duerrenmatt. a Swiss "El (This Strange Passion)" in
playwright in the vanguard of the Architecture Aud.
contemporary theatre, is also the 8:30 p.m. - The Professional
author of "The Visit." Under the, Theatre Program will present Neil
direction of Prof. James F. Coak- Simon's "The Odd Couple" at Hill
ley, "The Physicists" will run Aud.
Wednesday through Sunday, July 8:00 p.m.-The Center for Con-
12-16. tinuing Education of Women Dis-
Third in the summer festival cussion will present Helen Fritz
will be William Wycherly's Resto- and Janet Southwood speaking on
l b W W hr "Women in School and at Work"
ration comedy, "The Country in the West Conference Room of
Wife." Under the direction of Prof.' the Rackham Bldg.
William Halstead, "The Country the pa.khamhBodg.
Wife" is the rollicking account of w8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
a country girl who attempts to will present a concert by Angel
become a part of more restrained pRe linist an t Reid Nibley
society. The play will run July as pianist entitled "The Violin
26-30. and Piano Sonatas of Johannes
Brahms" in Rackham Lecture
Winding up the season will be Hall.
the University Players annual FI .A °
F ..RIDAYARCH.s.t* 31

SUNDAY, APRIL 2
4:15 p.m.-The School of Music
will present a concert by the Uni-
versity Symphony Band with Wil-
liam Revelli conducting and Susan
Nelson as saxophone soloist in
Hill Aud.
7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
Guild will present Alfred Hitch-
cock's "Shadow of a Doubt" in the
Architecture Aud.
Program Information J 5-6290
ENDING TONIGHT
You put the key in the door
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I

Small Colleges Cooperate
To Fund Research Projects

By DAVID DUBOFFf
Aided by Federal grants, 26
small colleges throughout the
country have banded together to
form six consortiums which will
enable them to pool their talents,
facilities and resources to carry on
educational research.
The' program, aclled CORD
(Consortium Restarch Develop-
ment) "began as a result of the
idea that skilled. personnel in
small colleges are an important
source of competent research," the
U.S. Office of Education reported
in the march issue of American
Education.
"Through this program a small,
low-budget college--with the help
of three or four other small in-
stitutions-~can contribute to edu-
cational research as well as a
large, well-endowed college," the
article said.
The consortiums are expected
to contribute to nation-wide ef-
forts in educational research,
while improving the research
capabilities of the participating
small colleges.

For example, one group of five
Oregon colleges will develop a new
biology curriculum. A group of
colleges in Virginia and New York
will make in-depth studies of
college freshmen.
A third group of colleges in
Tennessee and Mississippi will
consider ways of helping students
compete academically on a na-
tional rather than a regional
scale.
To help support these activities,
the Office of Education has
awarded about $50,000 to the six
groups of colleges, organized into
the following regions: North Caro-
lina, North Dakota-South Dakota,
Oregon, Tennesse-Mississippi, Vir-
ginia-New York, and Wisconsin.
Funds of a year's operation of
the consortiums were made availa-
ble under .the Cooperative Re-
search Act and the new program
of CORD grants.

musical comedy-this year Rick!
Besoyan's off-Broadway success,
"Little Mary Sunshine," is a
sparkling take-off on the operettas
of yesteryear. It recounts the tale
of pretty Mary Potts who runs
an inn deep in the wilds of the
Rocky Mountains. To this way-
station come the men of the Unit-
ed States Forest Rangers and the
young ladies of Eastchester Fin-
ishing School.
The musical will be produced
August 9-13, under the direction
of visiting Prof. Nate Katter from
Connecticut.

.[ L11Ltl.L, 11i1L S
10:30 a.m.-The Undergraduate
Honors Convocation will present
His Excellency U Thant, Secre-
tary-General of the United Na-
tions, speaking on "Education in
a Changing World" at Hill Aud.
7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
Guild will present Luis Bunnel's
"El (This Strange Passion)" in
the Architecture Aud.
SATURDAY, APRIL 1
7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
Guild will present Alfred Hitch-
cock's "Shadow of a Doubt" in
the Architecture Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The University Men's
Glee Club will present their
Spring Concert with Philip Duey
conducting in Hill Aud.

Rod Taylor
Catherine Spook
Karl Malden
Melvyn Douglas
Technicolor@ From Warner Bros.
Also Roadrunner Cartoon

Warner Bros. un-
locks all the doors
of the sensation -
filled best seller.

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Alec Guinness in
"HOTEL PARADISO"

a

presents

LYLE
TALBOT

HARVEY
STONE

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STILL SHOWING
THE
TRIUMPHANT
FINALE OF
THE 1966
NEW YORK
FILM FESTIVAL!'
LA GUERRE
EST FINIE
AWARDS: Shown outside the Fes-
tival of Cannes (approved as the
official French entry to the Cannes
Festival last May, it was with-
drawn under pressure from the
Franco regime). At the end of the
Cannes Festival, a group of Span-
ish film critics awarded LGEF its
newly-inaugurated Prix Luis Bu-
nuel. It also received the Interna-
tional Film Critics' Prize (Federa-
tion Internationcae de ta Presse
Cinematographic) at Cannes, the
"French Oscars" of the French
Academy (L'Academie du Cine-
ma) were awarded to Resnais for
"the best film of the year" and
to Yves Montand for "the best
performance."
Shown at the non-competitive 4th
New York Film Festival, 1966.
Directed by ALAIN RESNAIS
Starring YVES MONTAND,
INGRID THULIN and
introducing GENEVIEVE BUJOLD.
Produced by SOFRACIMA/PARIS-
EUROPA FILM, STOCKHOLM
A BRANDON FILMS RELEASE
FRIDAY: 7-9-11
SATURDAY: 5-7-9-11
A must for all
thinking peoplel
"" -VI-

4

.Drectedby MIK NICAOLS

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