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March 28, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-28

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PAGE T*6-

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH, 28, 1967

PAGE TWO THE MIChIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, MARCH 28, 1987

'Writing on the Wall' Reveals AT DEARBORN ESTATE:
.. Summer Fair Lane Concert Series
Dialogue of Political Thinkers Oh
8 Offers Opera, orchestral Production

t

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, March 28, 12:00 Noon
Subjects
"SOCIOLOGICAL IMPRESSIONS OF MEXICO"
Speaker: Sister Renee (USA)
Graduate Student in Spanish

i

By NEAL BRUSS
The handwriting on the walls of
a stall in an UGLI john continues.
Unlike mundane, traditional graf-
fiti, the UGLI inscriptions provide
a unified multi-ideological philo-
political dialogue:
"Communism has killed tens of

millions of people including my
family," according to one writer.
"How about a new system," an-
other suggested.
"Is all western civilization
next," the first continued.
"Hopefully," another wrote.
The messages are scrawled on

New Program Aids Teachers'
In 'Core-City' Schools

By NANCY SHAW
"How do you hold on to your
good ideas in the face of 30 or
40 other intransigent teachers? No
one gets trained for this," Prof.
David Angus of the School of
Education referred to the prob-
lems that teachers face when go-
ing into urban disadvantaged
schools.
To remedy the problem, he and
Prof. Melvyn Semmel, of the edu-
cation school, will begin directing
a radical program called Advanced
Study inrElementary Core-City
Teaching from this A u g u s t
through June of 1968.
Twenty-four teachers will enroll
in Rackham to be trained as ac-
tive leaders in social change under
the University's School of Educa-
tion. The applicants, who will be
chosen during April; must have
taught at least three years al-
ready in urban disadvantaged ele-
mentary schools. They must agree
to return to that same school sys-
tem to work a year after they
finish the Core-City program. Al-
so required.:are a recommendation
from.a representative of the dis-
advantaged community and from a,
local school official..
Teachers who are perceived as
outsiders; hostile to the disadvan-
taged community's life style, and
who try to win the children to
their own are typical now, says
the proposal for the program.
The root of the problem is in
the model for education of the
disadvantaged--it is now based on
a medical model of illness, says
Angus. The need, then, is to pay
more attention to the "pathologi-
cal nature of the environment so
t
'CINEMA II
presents-
IRMA'
LA DOUCE

that the disadvantaged child is
perceived as a dignified human
being trying desperately to ful-
fill his psycho-social needs with-
in a totally inadequate socio-cul-
tural milieu," as the proposal says.
The Socialist is to learn the
strategies for change. To bring
the adults into greater rapport
with the school system, the pro-
gram's directors are sugesting that
the school be opened up as a
center of the community. It can
be used as a job clearing, agency,
as a center for information on
legal aid, tedicine, training, and
welfare, and a service to help on
things like tax forms.
The University's program is a
part of the Experienced Teacher
Fellowship Program of the Na-
tional Office of Education, part
of the Department of Health, Ed-
ucation and Welfare. HEW is
subsidizing 70 of these programs
nationwide. It is giving $60,000
to the University for this one, as
well as a $4,800 stipend to each
fellow, and an allowance for de-
pendents. The fellows will receive
credit toward or beyond the mas-
ter's degree.
The proposal for the Core-City
program, whose acceptance was
announced in February, was co-
authored by Angus, Semmel, and
Prof. Matthew Trippe of the
education school. Trippe is chair-
man of the National Steering
Committee Task Force for the
NDEA Institute for Advanced
Study in Teaching Disadvantaged
Youth.

the painted walls of the stalls.
The walls look like they have been
scrubbed down many times. But
the graffiti dialectic continues:
"Whoever wrote this is a punk."
"Whoever wrote this is an ass."
"Aren't we all?"
"Ideologies don't kill, people do."
"Yes, but who make the ideol-
ogies, Rabbits?"
"That's the point . . . People
make the ideologies and people
kill."
"And this is a lack of commu-
nication."
"Sour grapes."
"Hitler had the right idea -.
Kill the damn Jews."
"The only good Yankee is a
dead one."
"Join the army to aid this
cause.
"The media is the message."
"America ...I like it."
"Mene, Mene Teckel Upharzen."
"f (x) - lnx."
The moving hand writes ...
Phoue 434-0190
I 0 6- Ora CARPENTER ROAD
Free OPEN 6:30 P.M. Free
Heaters NOW SHOWING Heaters
The Endless summer
IN COLOR
Shown at 9SP.M. Only
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Shock After Shock
"PARIS SECRET"
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Shown at 7:20 Only

The University Musical Society I resented by the Baroque Orchestra
will present the first "Fair Lane of the Chicago Symphony. Jean
Festival" this summer at the Uni- Martinon, musical director and vi-
versity's Dearborn Campus. olinist, will open the Festival on
The concerts will be performed June 4 with two programs of Bach
in the open air outside Fair Lane sonatas and concertos.
mansion, the home of the late On the following Sunday, June
Henry Ford. The United States 11, the Baroque Orchestra re-
Department of the Interior desig- turns from Chicago under the di-
nated Fair Lane one of America's rection of Antonio Janigro, guest
historics landmarks in December, conductor.and cello soloist, to per-
196'. The 200-acre estate is now form two programs of Italian ba-
the property of the University. roque music - Vivaldi, Pergolesi
The Festival is being inaug- and Corelli.
urated by the Musical Society in Opera Production
collaboration with the Dearborn From the Caramoor Festival,
Campus as a feature of the Uni- opera production under Julius
versity's Sesquicentennial celebra- Rudel, music director and organ-
tion. It will begin the society's ist, two recent works of Benjamin
89th season of concert presenta- Briten will be presented July 5-6
tions. in costume by a company of 25
'Festival of Festivals' singers and instrumentalists. One
The summer's theme will be of the numbers, "Curlew River,"
"Festival of Festivals," and will is a modern musical adaptation of
include representatives of four es- the 12th century Japanese Noh
tablished festivals: The June Fes- drama, 'Sumidagawa."
tival of the Chicago Symphony The other, "The Burning Fiery
Orchestra, the Caramoor Festival Furnace," is the story about Sha-
of Upper New York State, the drach, Meshack, and Abednego
Bath Festival of England, and the and their defiance of King Ne-
stratford Festival of Ontario. buchadnezzar of Babylon. This
The "June Festival" will be rep- opera will be premiered at Cara-

moor this summer before the Fair
Lane presentation.
From the Bath Festival, Yehudi
Menuhin and the Bath Festival
Orchestra will appear in their
first brief visit to America, on
Sunday, July 16. A pair of pro-
grams will feature Menuhin as
conductor and violinist and his
sister, Hephzibah, as piano soloist.
Works by Handel, Mozart, Haydn,
Bach, Purcell, and contemporaries
Britten, Blackwood, and Goehr
will be programmed.
From the Stratford Festival, for
the first time outside of Stratford,
the National Festival Orchestra
will appear in two concerts to close
the Fair Lane Festival on July 23.
Oscar Shumsky, music director,
will lead the orchestra and per-
form as solo violinist. Jose Iturbi
will be the featured piano soloist.
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AF

THIS WEEK
Thursday, Friday
EL
(This Strange Passion)
dir. Luis Bunvel, 1953
Spanish, subtitles.
Indictment of bourgeois
repression and orthodox
Christianity
Short: "LONELY BOY"
Study of Paul Anka
Saturday, Sunday
A SHADOW
OF DOUBT

PANAYISION COLOR by Deluxe
Dial NO 2-6264

MUCH IGAN

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one-hundred ninth annual

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AWARDS: Shown outside the Festival at Cannes (approved as the
official French entry to the Cannes Festival last May, it was withdrawn
under pressure from the Franco regime). At the end of the Cannes
Festival, a group of Spanish film critics awarded LGEF its newly-inaugu-
rated Prix Luis Bunuel. It also received the International Film Critics'
Prize (Federation Internationale de la Presse Cinematographic) at
Cannes. The "French Oscars" of the French Academy (L'Academie du
Cinema) were awarded to Resnais for "the best film of the year" and
to Yves Montand for "the best performance."
Shown at the non-competitive 4th New York Film Festival, 1966.
Directed by ALAIN RESNAIS
Starring YVES MONTANDe INGRID THULIN
and introducing GENEVIEVE BUJOLD
Produced by SOFRACIMA/PARIS-EUROPA FILM,
STOCKHOLM/A BRANDON FILMS RELEASE

Spring

Concert

SATURDAY, APRIL 1, 1967
HILL AUDITORIUM
TICKETS ON SALE

.. ... . . ... ' '.r> + ,. g ... .. ., .. Vii:..
..J L. s: , 1. : ?i:i::<i> .'"i'' i3:> ';iii' : :;. 2T,6 F . :>-;':.. .. _ ... .. r . _ ..

I

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