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March 22, 1967 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22, 1967

THE MICHIGAN UATIX

--

1118'! 1 a t' aa 'V(1a1. 1art a i.

PAGE NINE

Five
By DOUG HELLER
It is now spring vacation in East
Lansing. Even the dorms are lock-
ed. The Michigan State campus is
deserted.
And thrown into the vacuum is
the NCAA swimming champion-
ships, the big one. Needless to say,
plenty of tickets are available for
the finals, which will take place
tomorrow, Friday, and Saturday
nights at 8 p.m.
Why the plug? Because it seems
obvious that if anybody is going
to fill the Spartan pool, it's going
to be Michigan students.
The alternative is ridiculous.
Picture the likes of Don Schol-
lander of Yale, Greg Buckingham
of Stanford, Mike Burton of

inSL
UCLA, Ken Sitzberger of Indiana,
and Carl Robie of Michigan per-
forming in an extravaganza for
the benefit of a scattering of news-
paper reporters.
And the possibility of seeing a
meet of this prestige in this area
again will be unlikely for a long
time.
Last Time
In addition, this could be the
last big effort for a number of
1964 Olympians. This is because
this year's seniors, like Robie,
Dilley, and Sitzberger, all Tokyo
alumni, would risk an Uncle Sam
sponsored trip to Vietnam if they
take time off from graduate school
or a job to train for Mexico iCty.
A fact like this tends to curb in-
centive.
This will not affect those, like
Schollander (a winner of four gold
medals in 1964), who will still be
undergraduates and in condition
when 1968 rolls around.
The meet itself looks like a
murderously close one. Swimming
World calls it a tossup among
Indiana, S o u t h e r n, California,
Stanford, Yale, and Michigan.
Indiana Favorite
Wolverine coach Gus Stager
rates Indiana a 70 per cent chance
to take all the marbles on the
strength of its divers, mainly Sitz-
berger and Win Young. According
to Stager the Big Ten has about
the six best diving coaches around,
and none of those schools could
top the Hoosier duo.
He gives Michigan a 10 per cent
chance of winning, because the
Wolverines actually swam best att
the Big Ten meets, and were only
overcome by Indiana's diving.
This leaves the defending
champions from USC, the Stan-
ford Indians (who tied the Tro-
jans in a dual meet this year) and<
Schollander's troupe from New
Haven, Conn., a total 20 per centl
chance to win.4

vim

for

NCAA

Cro wn

""V,.

A blindfold test

From the West coast, Wolverine
Captain Robie will face competi-
tion that will make any challenge
he had previously this year look
like a nice day at the beach. Stan-
ford's Buckingham, who upset
Burton in their dual meet, sur-
passed Robei's 4:43.08 NCAA 500
yard freestyle record set this year,
with a 4:42.3 of his own. And then
there is a chance that Schollan-
der will swim the 500.
Bunched Up
In the 400 yard medley relay,
Michigan's best time is only .9 of
a second behind USC. But Indiana,
Stanford, Princeton and UCLA all
are in between. The 400 freestyle
relay finds MSU on top with a
3:08.7, with Michigan 1.2 seconds
behind and USC sandwiched in the
middle.
At this point, Robei's 200 yard
butterfly, with a time of 1:53.6,
alomst one and a half seconds
ahead of the nearest competitor,1
and Paul Scheerer's 2:11.5 breast-
stroke, are the events that seem
most likely to hold up for Mich-
igan. Scheerer is also trying to
retain his 100 yard breaststroke!
title.
Stager's biggest problem in thisj
meet, something that does not oc-
cur in others, is that he is very
unfamaliar with the competition.
He admits this and says "we real-
Billboard
Student tickets are now avail-
able for the basketball banquet
honoring Michigan's 1966-67,
cagers. The banquet will be held
next Tuesday night in the An-
derson Room of the Michigan
Union at 7:00 p.m. Tickets are
available to students for $5;
Alumni tickets are $10. For in-
formation, call Jim Podell at
764-8960.

ly won't know anything until we
get up there."
He hopes that the events the
Wolverines are weak in will be
won by teams that are otherwise
non-entities. Thus, State's Ken
Walsh with the best time in the
nation in the 100-yard freestyle
and Pete Wather of North Caro-
lina, who is best at the 50-yard
freestyle, could help out Michigan
by winning should their schools
fall behind.
But it seems that almost all the
contending schools are ahead of
Michigan in the 200-yard individ-

ual medley and 200-yard freestyle.
The scoring system will also
affect strategy. A winning relay
team will receive 32 points com-
pared with eight in a dual meet,
and the winner of an individual
event will get 16 points instead
of five as in a dual meet. Thus,
the relays will be more important
than they ordinarily are, and
teams -von't be able to spread
themselves thin in them.
The NCAA had a choice of about
500 schools to stage the champion-
ship in. The question is, why did
they have to pick an empty one?

--

_

_._

for beer.
If anybody ever says you can't
pick Budweiser with your eyes
shut, you can call his bluff.
First, stick your nose close
to the foam of each glass of
beer and take a sniff. Notice a difference?
The one with the clean, fresh aroma is
Budweiser.
Now taste. This gets a bit tricky. But
the one beer that tastes like beer without
any one flavor jumping out at you (like
hops, or an extra sweetness, or some-
times a sour or sharp taste) is Budweiser.
That's because Budweiser is blended-
by our Beechwood Ageing. We want you
to taste the beer, not the recipe.
If anybody pulls a beer-tasting test
on you, now you know how to win. Just
follow your nose.
Budweiser.
KING OF BEERS . ANHEUSER-BUSCH, INC. " ST. LOUIS
NEWARK . LOS ANGELES + TAMPA . HOUSTON

SORRY!
The Michigan Dail also wishes to thank
the following people whose names
were erroneously left out of our
Spring Fashion Supplement:
WILD'S--for supplying
men's clothes for the pictures
MODELS:
Jim Benton
John Gray
Marty Schlesinger

DON SCHOLLANDER

And this assumes UCLA, Prince-
ton, and North Carolina are just'
coming along for the ride.
Dilley Beware
And yet the team championships
might not be as exciting as cer-
tain individual matchups. First
from the Big Ten, Russ Kingery,
the Michigan backstroker who has
had about as much success at
catching State's Gary Dilley as
Snoopy did the Red Baron the
first six months he was at it,
makes the big attempt at the
climax of his career. Kingery, who
was ill during the Big Ten meet
and had to settle for second place
once again, has said he could take
Dilley and this may be his last
chance.

I

i

Panhelleni*c-IFC Endorse

For Student Government Council

KEN SITZBERGER

NBA PLAYOFFS:
-I

PRESIDENT and VICE PRESIDENT:

Red Hot
By The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA - The Cin-
cinnati Royals, with Oscar Rob-
ertson scoring 33 points and Con-
4. nie Dierking 29, upset the Phila-
delphia 76ers 120-116 last night
in the first game of a best-of-
five Eastern Division semifinal
playoff in the National Basketball
Association.
The 76ers who won the NBA
Eastern title in easy fashion dur-
ing the regular season, didn't come
' to life until the final quarter after
they, were down 11 points at 96-
85.
Then, Wilt Chamberlain collect-
ed 15 of his 41 points and 12 of
his 22 rebounds.
Philadelphia closed to within
two points, on three occasions, the
last at 116-114. But Robertson hit
for a 20-footer with 29 seconds
left and then collected the last two
of his 11 free throws with five
seconds on the clock to put it out
of reach.
Royals Throughout
At the end of the first quarter,
the Royals led by two, at 33-31,
and built a small but steady lead
through the second period to hold
a 63-57 advantage at intermission.
Philadelphia came back to tie
it at 66 with less than three min-
utes gone in the third period, but
Dierking sank two quick goals to
give Cincinnati a lead it never
lost.
Adrian Smith added 20 points
for the winners, who had beaten
Philadelphia only once in nine!
Y f

Royals Edge '76ers
games during the regular season. Finally reserves Rod Thorn
Behind Chamberlain, the Phila- Silas and Joe Caldwell paced
delphia offense was propelled by Louis spurt which gave the1
Hal Greer, with 23 points, and a comfortable 106-90 lead
Chet Walker with 16. way through the fourth qt
* * * Sidn.c ,.-.,,A ih i t.A

n, Paul
d a St.
Hawks
mid-
uarter.

Celtics Top Knichs
BOSTON-Sharpshooting Sain
Jones and John Havlicek combin-
ed for 70 points in leading the
Boston Celtics to a 140-110 rout
of the hapless New York Knick-
erbockers last night in a Nation-
al Basketball Eastern Division
playoff opener.
Jones hit for 38 points and Hay-
licek for 32 as the Celtics launch-
ed a bid for a ninth straight NBA
title before a small crowd of 8,-
362 at Boston Garden.
The fast-breaking Celtics led
from the opening tip-off in defeat-
ing their cousins from New York
for the 20th straight times ince.
March 17, 1965, in the initial game
of the best-of-five playoffs.
Jones hit for 13 points and
Howell for nine as the Celtics rac-
ed to a 34-28 first period lead.
Boston then pulled away to a 71-
51 halftime advantage as Havli-
cek sparked a second period surge
with 12 points.
Willis Reed led New York scor-
ers with 23 points while Cazzie
Russell contributed 18 and Fred
Crawford and Neil Johnson 16
each.
Hawks Whip Bulls
ST. LOUIS - The St. Louis
Hawks pulled away in the fourth
quarter and took a 114-100 deci-
sion from the pesky Chicago Bulls
in the first game of the Western
Division semifinal playoffs of the
National Basketball Association.
The Hawks managed to lead
throughout most of the game but
each time they threatened to pull
away from the Bulls Jerry Sloan,
Guy Rodgers or Don Kojis would
keep Chicago in the contest with
clutch points.

ouas scores eignL points anda Thorn
six in the Hawks' closing rally.
Lou Hudson topped the Hawks
with 26 points while Len Wilkens,
who had 16 free throws, added 20
points. Kojis and Bob Boozer each
had 18 to lead the Bulls.
Lord New Captain
Junior defenseman Bill Lord
was elected captain of Michigan's
hockey team for the 1967-68 sea-
son. His teammates elected him
to succeed out-going captain Mike
Marttila last night at their annual
banquet.

McGrath
FLYING SCHOOL
-LEARN TO FLY
"Saunter in the
Wild Blue Yonder"
Government approved
Instructors
Bob Runyon, Chief Pilot
and Instructor
" Hangar Space " Tie Downs
" Gas and Oil
" Re-Licensing 0 Plane Rides
" A.&E. Mechanic
" Airplanes Bought and Sold
" See Our Acrobatic-Experimental
& Old Time Planes
Fly in and Visit Us
Gordon N. Lambie, Mgr.
Chas. McGrath, Operations Mgr.
McEnnan Airport
5830 Stony Creek Rd.
Ypsilanti, Michigan
482-4560

JUDY GREENBERG
RICHARD HEIDEMAN
E. O. KNOWLES
MIKE McDERMOTT
JANIS SORKIN
KAY STANSBURY

I

BRUCE KAHN and RUTH BAUMAN

COUNCIL SEATS:

BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS:

I

RICHARD METZGER
LAURA SUTTA

I

Join in the

I

_

Catskills

WHY CART ALL THOSE CLOTHES HOME?

Grossinger's, Concord and other
Catskill Mt. resorts are now
hiring students for summer
jobs. Openings for waiters,
waitresses, chambermaids, life
guards, counselors, etc. Exper-
ience helpful but not essential.
Write for up-to-date catalog of
resort hotel jobs including
where to write to, jobs available
and salary. Send $1.00 to cover
printing, postage and handling
to Resorts International, 1362
Bramble Rd., N.E., Atlanta,
Georgia.

Greene's way

makes goig home

SCORES

a cinch!

EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Washington 9, Atlanta 8 (10 inn)
Cincinnati 9, Houston 4
Minnesota 7, Loa Angeles 4
New Yprk (N) 2, Baltimore 0
Philadelphia 10, Boston 5
Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 4
Chicago (A) 5, Kansas City 4 (10 inn)
New York (A) 5, Detroit 4
San Francisco 8, Chicago (N) 4
California 10, Cleveland 4

r-

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

I- -

i*

UM

STUDENTS

JUST CALL GREENE'S for one of our fabulous
Handi-Hampers storage boxes. Pack all the clothes
you won't wear until fall-Clothes you would ordi-
narily pack up, take home, have cleaned, pack up
again and bring back in the fall.
NOW, ALL YOU NEED TO DO is turn the Hamper
over to Greene's. They clean the lot at regular
cleaning prices and store it in a refrigerated moth-
proof vault. When you return in the fall, call
Greene's again, your clothes will be taken out of the
vault, returned to you freshly pressed on hangers
and packed in neat polyethylene bags, ready for
your clothes closet.
PRICE? $4.95 plus regular cleaning and pressing
prices-includes $250.00 insurance.
Call Normandy 2323.1 or Stop at
any Greene's Plant for Information

Score: 150

0

4

P.S. BY THE WAY, we notice that some of the
other shops around town are offering the Greene's
Handi-Hamper idea. But they can't offer the on-
the-premise refrigerated storage vault of Greene's
exclusive Microclean process. It's a plus to you at
the same price.

NO MORE!!

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