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March 22, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-22

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WT

SEEK SUCCESSOR:
House Attends Kowalski Rite;
Fiscal Proposals Considered

Vors ter Seeks New
South Africa Image

LANSING ()-The State House
of Representatives was in recess
yesterday: as members attended
the Detroit funeral of Rep. Joseph
J. Kowalski, their former speaker.
Also attending the funeral was
Gov. George Romney.
Kowalski, a 56-year-old De-
troiter who was speaker in 1965-
66 and Democratic leader this ses-
sion,. diedhSaturday afternoon-
about .50 hours after suffering a
brain hemorrhage in his Capitol
Building office.
House Adjourns
The only order of business at
Monday night's brief House ses-
sion was unanimous passage of a
resolution expressing the body's
"shock and sense of loss at the
untimely death of a colleague."
Although the shock and sadness
at Kowalski's death were genuine
on both sides of the political aisle,
the practical business of politics
and' government went on.
Republicans caucused on fiscal
reform and Democrats considered
possible candidates to succeed Ko-
walski as their leader in the
House.
House Republicans, facing a
Thursday deadline for deciding
what sort of tax reform package

should be reported from the tax-
ation committee, caucused for over
an hour Monday night following
the session and both before and
after the funeral yesterday, and
again in the evening.
Gov. George Romney's tax pack-
age involving, as originally pro-
posed, income tax rates of 21/2 per
cent on indivIduals, 5 per cent on
corporations and 8 per cent on
financial institutions was dis-
cussed.
It was considered likely that the
package, when it comes from com-
mittee, will have a slightly lower
financial institution rate. Re-
portedly there also is sentiment
for increasing the rate on in-
dividuals, either in committee or
on the House floor.
The Caucus also considered al-
ternative plans by Rep. Roy Spen-
cer, (R-Attica), and Roy Smith
(R-Ypsilanti).
Three Proposals
Spencer's package involves re-
peal of local income taxes. Higher
state tax rates-31/2, 61/2 and 81/
per cent-would permit a rebate to
local government units to replace
the abolished local taxes.
Smith's would levy income taxes
of 4.75 per cent on individuals and

8 per cent on corporations and
banks, while repealing school oper-
ating millage taxes. School districts
would be paid back by the state
the amount of property tax they
may currently collect and would
be allowed, with voter approval,
to levy a 2 per cent "piggy-back"
income tax.
Has Support
Rep. James Foks (R-Horton),
taxation committee chairman, said
the committee was unlikely to re-
port out either of those packages-
though he noted their supporters
could attempt to introduce them
on the floor as substitutes for the
Romney bills.
Romney said last week he op-
posed Smith's proposal, which he
described as an "open-end" pro-
gram under which "school dis-
tricts could spend whatever they
pleased and the state would have
to put up the money."
House Speaker Robert Waldron
(R-Grosse Pointe), said Monday
that although he, Folks, and Rom-
ney 'oppose Spencer's plan to re-
place local income taxes with state
tax refunds, there is considerable
Republican sentiment for the idea
and a lengthy argument over it
is likely.
Campaigning by Democrats for
Kowalski's job was soft-pedaled
until at least after today's funeral,
and a choice might not be reached
until next week.

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa
(A')-When he became Prime Min-
ister six months ago, much of
South Africa and the world knew
Balthazar J. Vorster as top cop in
a country where blacks outnumber
whites 4-1.
Vorster set out to change that
image. Today Vorster's friends and
political observers find him more
flexible, more human, than Ver-
woerd the former Prime Minister.
They consider he is readier to
listen to advice from his cabinet
colleagues, businessmen and econ-
omists.
Verwoerd was the mastermind
at the head of affairs, a man
whose word must not be chal-
lenged. He produced the blueprints
for separate development of major
race groups.
His reasoning is roughly: the
apartheid, philosophy is not that
blacks are inferior to white, but
that they are different and there-
fore they should live, work and
have their beings separately.
"I sincerely believe what we are
doing in South Africa is the right
thing," he says.
He believes, too, that South
Africa, increasingly under inter-
national fire, must be strong. His
government aims at a draft of all
males 17-25. This will mean near-
ly doubling the size of the armed
largest and best trained and
equipped.
President Charles Swart ex-
plained the military expansion as

an act "to deter aggression and
maintain peace and stability at
the southern end of a continent in
constant turmoil."
The Johannesburg Rand Daily
Mail, a critic of the government,
said it really means South Africa
is serving notice on the United
Nations and everyone else in the
West that this country could be
tough to tackle if ever it came to
a showdown.
Vorster refuses to accept the
U.N. decision that South Africa's
mandate over South-West Africa
must end with the territory's in-
dependence. South Africa has ad-I
ministered the territory as part
of this country.
From that stand he is unlikely
to budge but international reper-
cussions from either the Rhodesian
or South-West African problems
are known to concern Voster. Ob-
servers say he fears external press-
ures might createuinternal ten-
sions which could upset his plans
for "white unity through tran-
quility."

CINEMA 11
presents
,dean-Paul
Belmondo
in
THAT MAN
FROM RIO
(Color; French with
English subtitles)
FRIDAY 7and
and 9:15
SATURDAY 50c
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL
ID. Required

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22, 1967
The University of Michigan
Gilbert & Sullivan Society
Presents
PATIENCE
March 22 ) , 24,25
Wed., Thurs. Performances ...... .....$1.50
Fri., Sat. Performances ................ $2.50
T Sat. Matinee 5:00.Lyia.Mendlssohn.ox.Off$1.50
Tickets on sale 9:00 to 5:00 Lydia Mendelssohn Box Office
::ag s es;rmsdag s;r e

r w-m

"'- '

FRESHMEN:

UN ION-LEAGUE

TONIGHT AT 8 P.M.
MO SHE SHAMIR
B'NAI B'RITH VISITING LECTURER
PRIZE-WINNING WRITER AND PLAYWRIGHT
OF ISRAEL
"AN HISTORICAL NOVELIST
VIEWS HISTORY"
SPONSORED BY HILLEL
AND THE JEWISH COMMUNITY COUNCIL
AT THE
ZWERDLING-CORN CHAPEL
1429 HILL STREET
ALL WELCOME

'U' Granted 4 Additional
Education Fellowships

THINK SOPHOMORE
SOPH SHOW PETITIONS
are available at UAC office,
2nd floor, Union
All petitions due Friday, March 24th

4

By NANCY SH1AW
The University has been granted
an additional -four fellowships for
next year under the 1965 Higher
Education Act, the United States
Office of Education announced re-
cently. The fellowships. will go to
four graduate students in elemen-
tary and secondary teaching of
music.
Eight fellows are currently stu-
dying music at the University
under the program, which is ad-
ministered' .bythe Department of
*health, Education and Welfare.
806:. fellowships are awarded each
year across.the nation-30 of them
at. Michigan institutions-to 128
sclhools.
Candidates. for the fellowships
here are being selected- presently,
ac.cording to. Professor Stewart C.
Hulslander of - the Education

School. Qualifications for appli-
cants are:
recent graduate status (not
necessarily from the University)
with no previous teaching experi-
ence;
curricular program leading to
a Masters' Degree in music with
emphasis on theory and literature.
Each fellow receives a $2,000,
stipend for the first year, and
$2,200 for the second. There is also
an allowance for dependents. The
University is given $2,500 per fel-
low per year from the U.S. Office
of, Education.
Phone 434-0190
xA.e u WEaNTER ROAD
Free OPEN 6:30 P.M. Free
Heaters NOW SHOWING Heaters
TheEndles Summer.
IN COL OR
Shock After Shock
"PARIS SECRET"
-In Color-
Shown at 7:20 Only
Program Information r 2-6264
jATE
ENDS FRIDAY!

UNION-LEAGUE

CREATIVE ARTS
COMMITTEE
announces:

'P1

III.

iI

Z--,

STUDENT TRAVEL COMMITTEE
GROUP FLIGHT MEETINGS:
Flight No. 1 (May 3-June 3)--Monday, March 20
Flight No. 2 (May 15-Aug. 19)--Tuesday, April 4
Flight No. 3 (June 27-Aug. 16) -Wednesday,
March 22
7:00 P.M., 3rd Floor Conference Room of Union
THINK SUMMER!

Petitioning for Creative Arts Festival
General Co-Chairman

Petitions available UAC office,
2nd floor, Union.

L

I

4

EASTER DINNER
at the COMMONS

eINA'
this week
THURSDAY & FRIDAY
Two of the finest
anti-war films
NIGHT & FOG
dir. Alain Resnais
(director of
"La Guerre est Finie")
LET THERE
BE LIGHT
dir. John Huston
7:00 & 9:05 P.M.
in Architecture Aud.
SATURDAY & SUNDAY
LES PARENTS
TERRIBLES
dir. Jean Coctau
L STILL ONLY 50c

f r r rrr .

MICH IGAN

\
./

ENDSTONIGHT
"THE SHAMELESS
OLD LADY"
Dial 5-6290
STARTS
Its lk
running.
a big city...
a unique
empire...
a private
world
disturb
sign on
every
door...
Starring BOBTWE
CAIR8I E SPAK AB[ MALEM[EMY'N IlASC RUHAO MHAE[ BENIE
MdIN I I and MEAI BE ROINI as"The Duchess" Original Music by Johnny Keating
Based on the novel by Arthur Hailey - Written for the Screen and Produced by WENDELL MAYES
Directed by RICHARD QUINE TECHNICOLOR®*FROM WARNER BROS.

Serving: 12 Noon-2 P.M.
Onion Soup Au Gratin
Roast Prime Rib of Beef An Jus
Boned Breast of Chicken Sesame with Cranberry Sauce
Grilled Center Cut Ham Steak with iPneapple Crescent
Roast Leg of Spring Lamb with Buttery Bread Dressing
Beef Stroganoof over Egg Noodles
Baked Beef Loaf
Broiled Tenderloin Steal,
Fluffy Whipped Potatoes
Scalloped Potatoes
Corn on Cob
Garden Peas
French Fried Cauliflower
Stewed Whole Tomnatoes
Your choice of 18 different salads
and 18 different homemade desserts
Children's plates along with high chairs and bibs, available.
A special surprise for each child.

GLEE CLUB

kI'ih9Cofcept
SATURDAY, APRIL 1
BLOCK SALES START

MEN'S

THURSDAY, MARCH

23

PETER O'TOOLE
OMAR SHARIF

INDIVIDUAL SALES MARCH 27-31

HILL AUDITORIUM

BOX OFFICE

up

NIB
y rY:va*.' ,
a'

$1.50, $2.00, $2.50

I

I

PANAVISION® * TECHNICOLOR1
1:00-3:40-6:20-9:00

HOLDING
OVER

.. _{U:«iv" t~':v i 4- "::«u : .d: : 'f:'r :: "

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
19-PIECE
JAZZ BAND
Bruce W. Fisher, Director
This band' has been described as:
performing with an ease and

C:Mmolmlidlry

For a 5th Week!
.BEST FILM ,,OF
19661"
Notionol Society of Film Critics
A CarlofPonti Production
Antonioni's
- I U - - - -

,

I.

M.

I

I

I

t.

I

m

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