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January 11, 1967 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-01-11

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. PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN .DAILY:

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1967

4 W ~E M C I G N D i YW D E D Y. J N A Y 1 . 1 8

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FILMS
Mademoiselle: Erotie Depravity
In a Menaerie o Horrors

First Godard Film:
Vivid, Disappointing

By BETSY COHN
"Mademoiselle," while trying to
shock the viewer into' a realiza-
tion of the bestiality of man, be-
comes an annoying menagerie of
horrors too tough for any humane
society to handle.
Jean Moreau ("Mademoiselle) is
the school matron in a small
French village. She is a miserable,
twisted mouth spinster whose sup-
pressed frustrations are released
in perversion, cruelty and gro-
tesque distortion.
The story unfurls its brittle
substance as Moreau becomes en-
twined in a fascination with the
bronzed anatomy of the new Ital-
lian (Ettore Mann). Her rendez-
vous with Manni occurs strangely
and vicariously. After Adonis rit-
uals before the .mirror, she puts
on her black mesh gloves, a knit
shawl and humbly begins her noc-
turnal'terrorizations. Great digni-
ty is upheld throughout, as the

lady burns barns, floods live-
stocks and feeds poison to throngs
of animals.
In each of thees little escapades,
the handsome Italian serves -in
turn as the bare-chested hero,
leaping from sizzling haylofts leav-
ing the ladies breathless from his
aerial ventures. The vulture-like
insidiousness of Mademoiselle and
the beefy brawiness of the Ital-
ian are finally (although not co-
incidentally) brought together by
the sinuous linking of a snake.
Shortly after, the movie comes to
the climax that must be expected
from the sadistic flavor which it
delights in savoring throughout,
The direction of "Mademoiselle"
by Tony Richardson is almost an
antithesis to the writing of Genet.
Richardson's previous films have
all been clean-cut, bouncy ditties
of English middle class life, in-
formative and humorous ("Tom
Jones," "Saturday Night, Sunday
Morning," "The Loneliness of the

Long Distance Runner"). They are
narrations rather than revelations
or analyses.
Genet's .writing, on the other
hand, is.a constant groping for the
criminal and depravity in noan.
His characters, like Mademoiselle,
are a panorama of evil (in this
case, erotic evil)-. Combined 'with
Richardson's direction, the grotes-
queness of the images are vivid,
distinct and unforgettable.
Yet, the justification for such
perversion is questioned; when
mademoiselle is reduced to no more
than a lustful animal in heat,
when all the scenes of cruelty and
depravity focus on animals and
nature, one is ready to acknowl-
edge the fact of bestiality, sexual
repression, its consequences, etc.
Yet these topics, as presented in
"Mademoiselle" seem to be merely
an excuse, rather than an expla-
nation, for the movie to dwell on
distortion, depravity and shock.

By PAUL SAWYER
Jean-Luc Godard, the freewheel-
ing, exuberant young iconoclast of
the European cinema, sumarizes
the essence of his art, it seems to
me, in a quote appearing in the
booklet the Cinema Guild has
prepared for its six-day Godard
festival: "How to render the in-
sides?" he says. "By wisely stay-
ing on the outside."
This would hardly seem new
coming from an austere classicist
like Bresson; on the other hand,
the current avant-garde infatua-
tion with "form" and' technical.
showiness, to which Godard is
related, rarely seems interested in
getting to the inside of anything.
In "Breathless" Godard showed
how it could be done; and, in "A
Woman is a Woman," a comedy
playing tonight at the Cinema
Guild, he shows how a kind of
psychological realism can be
evoked by means of what looks
like a grab-bag of sight gags, in-
jokes, technical tricks, and Michel
Legrand.

For although on the immediate
level, "A Woman is a Woman"
seems to dissolve from one joke
into another all the way through,
one never loses the sense of some-
thing happening on a realistic
level underneath it all. First, by
the abandonment of plot, Godard
allows the characters to move
about almost aimlessly and to
say all kinds of things, including
ad libs, which are often of no
intrinsic significance, but which
eventually add up by accretion to
an effective formation of charac-
ter. Second, the sight gags and
seemingly capricious technical
tricks are inseparable from the
mood of what is going on, and
they reflect what is really hap-1
pening inside the characters'
heads.
With all this, it is not surpris-
ing that this film still fails really
to get "inside" anything; it is'
primarily and deliberately a ca-1
price. Its great success is a clever
portrait of a very charming girl,
but- this succeeds largely; because
the actress, Anna Karina, is
allowed just to play herself
throughout her role. The otherj
men are not so interesting; Jean-
Claude Brialy came out little more
than an irritable bore for me. The
variety of comic and whimsical
techniques is greatnbut none of
it is really brilliant. But it is fun,
and worth your time.

Across
Campus.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 11
4:00 p.m.-"The Young Rad-
ical," a symposium with writer-
in-residence Leslie A. Fiedler,
Mike Zweig, Prof. Tonsor, and
Ed Robinson will be held in the
UGLI Multipurpose Room.
7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
Guild will present Jean-Luc Go-
dard's "Une Femme Est Une
Femme" in the Arch. Aud.
7:30 p.m. - Prof. M. M. Tho-
mas, visiting professor of theology
at Union Theological Seminary,
wil speak on "Communism, Dem-
ocracy and Social Revolution" in
Aud, A, Angell Hall.
8:00 p.m. - Mr. Iver Richard,
member of Parliament, will speak
on "Labour's Prospects in Britain"
on the sixth floor of the Institute
of Social Research.
8:00 p.m. - Ralph Muncy,
Chinn., State Central Committee
of the Socialist Larbor Party, will
discuss "The Un-American In-
volvenent of the U.S. Government
in Vietnam" in Rm. C-100, Ann
Arbor High School.
THURSDAY, JAN. 12
4:00 p.m. - Leslie A. Fiedler,
writer-inresidence, will speak on
"The Responsibility to Be Free,"
in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
Guild will present Jean-Luc Go-
dard's "Alphaville" in the Arch.
Aud.

kIt~r about MUSKET
... The great glory of this show
is that you don't feel obliged
to commend it "in spite of"
anything ,
John Manning-Michigan Daily
about6MUSKET'S Wonderful Town
of 1965

4

.. ........ . ........ .. - ---------

TODAY

Aamm)

Shows at 1:00-
3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00

PANAVISIONs
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fin I ruN17ED a-
RTISTS
E A T

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~DEAN N-t
MARTIN MARGRET
SMATTIHEIM

7The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of M ichigan 'for which The
Michigan Dailygassumes no'editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the, day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday,
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-8429.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11

alysis," Wed., Jan. 11, 4:15 p.m., 1139
Natural Science Bldg.
Young Democrats-General meeting
will be held tonight at 7:30 p.m. in
the Multipurpose Room of the UGLI.
Lecture Series: The first in a series
of four lectures, "An Introduction to
Digital Computers and the MAD Lan-
guage," will be held Wed., Jan. 11. in
the Natural Science Aud. from 7:30 to
9:30 p.m. The non-credit lectures are
open to students, faculty and staff-
no knowledge of computers will be as-
sumed. There is no charge. Lecturer
will be Prof. Brice Carnahan of the
Chemical Engineering and Biostatistics
Departments.

a Y Calendar Center for Chinese Studies/History of
Art Dept. Lecture-Bo Gyllensvard, di-
Botany Seminar: Dr. Rowland H. Da- rector, Museum of Far Eastern Antiqui-
vis will ;speak on "Enzyme Variation in ty, Stockholm, Sweden, "Art and Arch-
the Genus Neurospora--A Genetic An- aeology in Mainland China: Impres.
ORGANIZATION NOTICES.
. r+h, "{."rJn r " r J r rw"::.

sions from a' Recent Visit": Aud. B,
Angell Hall,;4:15 p.m'
General Notices
Mathematical Association . of Amer-
ica: Will show a film, "Can You Hear
the Shape *of a Drum?".starring Mark
Kac, Thurs., Jan. 12, 4 p.m., 2225 An-
gell Hal.
The Michigan. Memorial-Phoenix Proj-
ect invites requests for faculty research
grants to support research within the
scope of the term "peaceful uses of
nuclear energy." The . Project is par-
ticularly interested in studies concerned
with: Biological Effects of Radiation.
Radiation Disometry, New Uses of Iso-
topes, New Tracer Techniques, Direct
Conversion of Nuclear Energy to Elec-.
trical Energy, The Fusion Process, Plas-
mas as. Related to. Controlled Fusidn,-
Radiation Chemistry, Nuclear Weapons
Proliferation an'd Disarmament, Psy-
chological Attitudes Toward Nuclear.
Energy . Hazards, Evaluation of. Hazards
to Urban Populations from Nuclear
Activities, and Economic Studies of
Nuclear Activities Including Power Pro-
duction. The Project will not support-
Work whose only relation to nuclear
energy is a routine use of isotope
tracer, techniques.,
Requests for grants of $3000 or less
are most appropriate.. Grants .may cov-
er equipment, supplies, research assist-
ance, and field trips. Applications for
these grants should be . returned to
the Phoenix Project by. Mon., Jan. 30.
Grants will be made by April 1, 1967.

Application blanks may be obtained
trom the office of the Phoenix Proj-
ect at the Phoenix Memorial.Labora-
tory on the North Campus or by call-
ing 764-6213.
College of Engineering and Institute
of Science and Technology Colloquium:
Prof. A. B. Rosenstein of the Engi-
neering Department, University of Cali-
fornia at .Los Angeles, will speak on:
"Synthesizing the' Engineering Curric-
ulum," on Thurs.. Jan.. 12, at 4 p.m.
in Room 229 West Engineering Bldg.
His talk will be preceded by a coffee
hour at, 3:30 p.m. The public is cordial-
ly invited.
Applications for Faculty Research
! (Continued from Page 8)

I~r
-".me
meUmnI

She the
~wrldsmost 1J
bankrober.'~
hTE
A n~rnn'.

TODAY
at 1 :00
3:00 5:05
7:15 9:25

I

II

Al RPO)RT
LIMOU SINES
for information call
663-8300
Tickets are ovail able
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union

mtry UUiUwyn-mayer pes /
opnelope. . .-
kuibannen dkklin-
peerfak lilayedWm lou Ja .i
a d W
~~OIat1~fW1It1S I Pnaiso Mtrcoo

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to offi-
cially recognized and -registered student.
organizations. only. Forms are. available
in Roon 1011 SAB. -
** *
Political Science Roundtable, Ivor
Richard, Labour M.P., will speak on
"Labour's Prospects in Britain," Jan.
11; 8 p.m., 6th floor, Institute for So-
cial Research.'Open house at Dr. Stokes
after the meeting. .
* .* *

U. of M,. Rifle Club, Open shooting,
.22 calibre rifle and pistlo, Wed., Jan.
11, -7-9 p.m., ROTC Rifle Range. All
rifles and pistols furnished;, ammuni-
tion available at a reduced price.
* * *
Crop and''Saddle Coed Riding Club,
Riding on Thurs. nights, meet at 6:30
p.n. at Women's Athletic Bldg.
* *' *
Christian Science Organization, Testi-
mon' meeting, Thurs., Jan. 12, 7:30-
8:30 p.m., 3545 SAB.

I

a , CAMILIA SPARV JAMES GREGORY-BEVERLY ADAMS
Introducing DINO. DESI and BILLY.-Featuring the "Slaygiris -Screenplay by HERBERT BAKER
Based on the novel by DONALD HANILTON - Music by Lalo Schifrin - Produced by IRVING ALLEN,
Directed by HENRY LEVIN -A Meadway-Claude Picture- TECHNICOLOR*
R,
about the
GRAND PRIZE WINNER 1966
CANNES FILM FESTIVAL
A DAZZLING DISPLAY OF
VIRTUOSITY! --Saturday Review
TENDER, GLOWING. IT
SHOULD WIN AkGRAND
PRIZE WHEREVER IT SHOWS!
-Pittsburgh Press
ATRULY FANTASTIC FILMI .
-Boston Traveler
A VISUALLY EXCITING EX-
PERIENCE! -Boston Herald
A BEAUTIFUL FILM!
-The New Yorker -
A FREE, VIGOROUS CINE-
MATIC STYLE. INCIDENTS
THAT HAVE POIGNANCY
AND CHARM! -N.Y. Times
...AS GREAT AS ANY FILM

University Lutheran Chapel,
Washtenaw, m uid-week devotion,
[It. 10 p.m.,' Rev. Arthur Spomer
preacher.

1511
Jan.
guest

U. of M. Amateur Radio Club, Meet-
ing, Jan. 11, 7 p.m., 2084 East Engineer-
ing..
Le Cercle, Francais, Le Baratin--enjoy
a French atmosphere, Thurs., Jan. 12,
3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Scottish Country Dane Society, Danc-
ing, Wed., Jan. 11, 8-10 p.m., Women's
Athletic Bldg.

the
AMERICANS
PLUS ONE
celebrate
First
ANNIVERSARY
FRIDAY (the 13th)
"CLUB 600" S.Q.

"SUPERIOR OFF-BEAT, AND
ORIGINAL!-N.Y. TIMES
4,COUMBIA PICT RE
JAMOS Mm N~ae al S YN Rave
SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES
Wednesday 7 and 9
Ann Arbor, Michigan
210 S. Fifth Avenue
761-9700

I

E

I

FESTIV
J EAN-LU(
TONIGHT
UNE FEMME ES'
(A WOMAN ISAWO
"Godard has shown
way of effectively
With Jean-Paul Belmo
Anna Karina
THURSDAY & FRIDA)
ALPHAVILLE
SATURDAY & SUNDA
BANDE A PAR
(BAND OF OUTSIDER
7:00& 9:00: all
ARCH I TECTU
STILL

T UNE FEMME
MAN-1961)
a new
using color"
ndo and

AL WEEK
OF
CGODARD

BUl. -

4''

14

I

YET SEEN!

-N.Y.-Poit,77

CLAUDE CIROUX
PRESENTS
AWOMAN
IN EASTMANCOLOR
~ RELEASED BY ALLIED ARTISTS

special

FREE

special~

S-1963)
in French with subtitles
RE AUDITORIUM

I

w

UAC MUSKET '67

CINEMA II
presents
Cary Grant
Audrey Hepburn
in
Charade
TECHNICOLOR
FRIDAY and
SA~TURDAY'

DIAL
8-64 16

Ci a

TOMORROW

but

TICKETS:
* Block Sales
January 13

ONLY 50c

ENDS TONIGHT-

TONY RICHARDSON'S
"MADEMOISELLE"

.I
,t

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@ur
, *1tnbg

-4

I Individual Sales
start
January 16
Lydia Mendelssohn
Box Office
All Seats $2.50
Pefmnes.

TODAY at 4:00

the new musical

"THE YOUNG RADICAL
A symposium with:

I

lid iwti3 ) .fTI-- . k "gas IC

hii

II

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