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March 16, 1967 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-16

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 16, 1967

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, MAR01 16, 1967

THEATRE
Miller's 'After the Fall' Weak MEa
Despite Strong Lead Character P

By ANN L. MARCHIO
"After the Fall" by Arthur Mil-
ler is a somewhat tedious and ov-
erwritten confession that the play-
wright does not know himself.
Presented as the second in a fes-
tival of three Miller plays, by
the speech department, the play is
a montage of incidents in which
Miller attempts to discover inno-
cence.
The hero, Quentin (Mark Owen),
is a lawyer who tells the story of
his life, which has an amazing
resemblance to Miller's own mat-
uration. From the beginning, the
stage is sterile, only decorated
once with bedcovers. Of course,
this would immediately suggest the
haze covering Quentin's own un-
derstanding, buthsomehow it just
seems to be a handy device for
maintaining the circulation of Mil-
ler's characters, most of which are
women.
And women play an important
role in the play. Obsessed and
aloof at the same time, Quentin
can never accept their existence
except as a source of philosophy.
And the latter is abundant. On
several occasions it is hard to re-
member that it is a play and not
a soliloquy that is being present-
ed.
To summarize briefly the auto-
biographical content of the play,
apart frnm the well-known incor-
poration of the late Marilyn Mon-
roe, there are counterparts in the
playwright's first wife, played by
Paula Marchese, and his ex-Com-
Across
Campus
THURSDAY ,MARCH 16
4:15 p.m.-Theodor H. Gastor,
professor of religion at Barnard
College, Columbia University, will
speak on "A New Aproach to the
Prophets" In Aud. D.
4:30 p.m.- An International
Center Tea will be held at 603
East Madison.
7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
Guild presents "Les Quarte Cents
Coups The 400 Blows)" as part
of a weekend of Francios Truf-
fant in the Architecture Aud.
7:45 p.m. - Frank Koen will
present a Linguistics Department
Lecture on "Some Possible Im-
plications of Psychological Per-
formance for Linguistics Rules" in
the Rackham Amphitheater
8:00 p.m.-The Department of
Speech University Players presents
Arthur Miller's "After the Fall"
in Trueblood Aud.
FRIDAY, MARCH 17
..7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
Guild presents "Les Quartes
Cents Coups" The 400 Blows) as
part ofa Francios Truffant week-
end in the Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The Department of
Speech University Players present
Arthur Miller's "After the Fall"
in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
presents the University Arts
Chorale and Womne's Choit, May-
nard Klein directing, in Rackham
Lecture Hall.

munist friends who did and did
not cooperate with the House Un-
American Activities Committee
during the McCarthy trials.
However, the most intriguing sec-
tion of the play can be found in
the character of Maggie, played by
Kathleen Thompson. At first, her
tintilating sensuality seems to sup-
plement his uncertainty, and she
paradoxically moves before him as
a symbol that man can win in his
quest for innocence. She is not
ashamed of herself. But he is. And
that kills them both.
He realizes that the two opposite
women have drawn the same con-
clusion that he cannot love, and
the truth hurts. He divorces his
first wife and allows his second to
commit suicide. And with this de-
struction he begins to mourn
things falling apart.
Like the poor characters of,
Kafka, he sees too late that other
people exist, that there is hatred
in the world, and that the only
way to survive is to create a work-
able lie by killing the conscience.
But does it end so pessimistical-
ly? No, Arthur Miller is not dead.
From the depths of burning cities
-and the only one to survive of a
Group for the Assassination of
Hitler-there steps Holga, played
by Katherine Ferrand.
Holga instills him with new life

and introduces a new concept pre-
viously unmentioned, hope. Al-
though her character is full of
conflicts, she projects a certain
kind of unity for him.
To be sure she weeps for him,
worships him and flies from who-
knows-where to meet him, but
there is still some intangible bond
that exists between them. Miller
wouldn't step out so positively
from the midst of his foggy allu-
sions and admit that this new feel-
ing is love, but as they skip hap-
pily off the stage, there is little
doubt left to the imagination of
the audience.
Phone 434-0130
Enanca 0L CARPENTER RODo

FIRST OPEN 6:30 P.M.
RUN FREE HEATERS
NOW SHOWING

FIRST
RUN

ROBERT LIE
STACK SOMMER
and NANCG CHRISTIAN
KWA1 na' MARQUAND
at
9 P.M. Only

TONIGHT &
TOMORROW
THE
400
BLOWS
"Every child must
receive his four
hundred blows
before reaching
adulthood."
-French addage
French, with subtitles
7:00 & 9:00
ARCHITECTURE AUD.
-STILL ONLY 50c r

I

16

ALSO:
TECHNICOLORS Shown at
7:15 Only
Ending Tonight "*
*~~ LAh

iterial
ortrayal
And that, in itself, is a miracle.
From the conflicts of inner and
outer self there emerges a sem-
blance of maturation. But the man
leaves the stage before we realize
that the youth has died.
, The play will be shown through
Sunday, March 19. Tickets may be
purchased at the Trueblood Aud.
ticket office in the Frieze Build-
ing.
CINEMA I
presents
STEVE McQUEEN
JAMES GARNER
RICHARD
ATTEN BOROUGH
JAMES COLBURN
CHARLES BRONSON
DAVID McCALLUM
in
THE GREAT
ESCAPE.
CINEMASCOPE & COLOR
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
6:15 and 9:15 P.M.
SUNDAY at 7 P.M.
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL
50c
I.D. Required
k** HIGHEST RATING!"
N.Y. DAILY NEWS
NET
AR CAST - PANAVSION*
Holding For A
4th Week!
BEST FILM OF
19661" '
Notional Society of Film Critics
A Carlo Ponti Production
Antonioni's
BLOW-UP
Vanessa Redgrave
David Hemmings - Sarah Miles
COLOR
Re**acommnd fo
sl: A Premier Prodctons Co.. tic. ees.
Mon. thru Fri.
' Shows ot
7 and 9 P.M.

BURN

Student
United Jewish Appeal A
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING Gen
TON IGHT at 8:00
1429 Hill Street All Welcome
RESERVATIONS: HU 2-3453
EMU THEATRE MARCH 15-19
Musk
UNIVERSI
jr gji gsAn
Al
4~ re __ __ __A
Sun
SESQUICENTENNIAL
PURIM 1967-5727
Hillel Experimental Debates
Program No. 10
Sunday, March 26 at 7:30
"SINS OF THE HAMANTASCHEN
VS.
FLAMING LATKES"
SINNERS FLAMERS
PETER M. BAULAND MARVIN BRANDWIN
Asst. Prof. English Psychologist, NPI
JOSEPH A. REIF HENRY D. AIlKEN
Lecturer, Linguistics Philosophy
MODERATORP
ABRAHAM KAPLAN, Philosophy
Admission Free All Welcome
Optional Deli House Supper
Preceeding Debate-Reservations 663-4129
READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIED ADS
ENDS
TOMORROW Lst 2 Days
MIEHALrAINE Nii eM
1 :15 r 11966 N I
3:15
5:15 "A TRIUMPH
720THE OUTS
9:20
"BEAUTIFUL
NetWEMAWNIUNs~enemotionaIl
"A WORK O
STARTS
.S~ITATE'" OKO
SATURDAY
NO 2-6264

A manhunt explodes
with shock and
excitement!
a. .
C~
AWARDS:
ofica Frenc
under Pressut
Festival, a gro
COUUMBIAPICTUREs prents rated Prix Lu
Prize (Feder
IMHEii SPIEGEL /aixLITVAK - Canes. Te j
>r:: Cannes. The
Cinema) were
to Yves Mont
Shown at ther
Starrin
a
Pro
TN U ...S

TY PLAYERS announce .
Extra Matinee Performance
of ARTHUR MILLER'S
FTER THE FALL

day, March 19, at 2:30 F
Trueblood Auditorium
Box Office open daty at 1 2:30 P.M.

P.M.

era
Pei
et(

/, , ,
zw

It.

UAC-MU
announce Petiti

1 Chairman
itions Avai
Office 3rd

SKET
oning for
March 19-24
Table at
Floor League

............ . ..... . .. . ..

Please note: "AFTER THE FALL" replaces
"AN ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE"
NOTE ALSO CHANGE OF THEATRE!

*b

WITH AN INTERNATIONAL ALL-ST

U1

STARTS FRIDAY

I

TRIUMPHANT FINALE
OF THE
EW YORK FILM FESTIVAL !
H, AN OUTSTANDING FILM OF OUR TIME. CERTAINLY
TANDING OFFERING AT THE FESTIVAL."
-Judith Crist, World-Journal Tribune
LY MADE AND ACTED . . . strikingly realistic and
y taut."-Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times
F ART .. a great statement for our times."
-Archer Winsten, N.Y. Post

'4

T

00

FREE CONCERT

MOZART MASS
c minor
Presented by
ARTS CHORALE
Maynard Klein conducting

-- .

"I CANNOT IMAGINE THAT ANYONE WHO TAKES
MOVIES SERIOUSLY WILL WANT TO MISS 'BLOW-
UP' " -Jay Carr, Detroit News

"There is a lot
in 'BLOW-UP'

of
"! I

'LA DOLCE VITA'
-Louis Cook, Free Press

Friday

8:30 P.M.

Hill

I

"A STUNNING PICTURE
A FASCINATING
PICTURE . . .
about the matter of personal in-
volvement and emotional commit-
ment in a jazzed-up, media-hook-
ed world!"
-Bosley Crowther
New York Times
"SO STUNNING THAT
YOU WANT TO SEE IT
MORE THAN ONCE!"
-Archer Winsten,
New York Post

"MOST TALKED-
ABOUT OF THE
NEW MOVIES!"d
-Dick Osgood,
WXYZ

Shown outside the Festival at Cannes (approved as the
: entry to the Cannes Festival last May, it was withdrawn
re from the Franco regime). At the end of the Cannes
oup of Spanish film critics awarded LGEF its newly-inaugu-
is Bunuel. It also received the International Film Critics'
ation Internationale de la Presse Cinematographic) at
"French Oscars" of the French Academy (L'Academie du
e awarded to Resnais for "the best film of the year" and
and for "the best performance."
non-competitive 4th New York Film Festival, 1966.
Directed by ALAIN RESNAIS
ng YVES MONTAND " INGRID THULIN
nd introducing GENEVIEVE BUJOLD
oduced by SOFRACIMA/PARIS-EUROPA FILM,
STOCKHOLM/A BRANDON FILMS RELEASE
m -rV f' _011

Michelangelo Antonioni's
first English language film
starring

;; : ^@ : : y. " 2 "= .: $< :.1**

I

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