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March 12, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

C. Tfi'AtTI X'V 'At X tf! it " n .. y w..w...

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

"H MCHE~l'~a l7 L1 ~JNJI UI.U1,16
;.J ' W rTT T W TTA - ./ - - TTTiiI' i

SUNDAY, MARCH 12, 1967

7

AT HILL AUDITUKIUM:
The Lovin' Spoonful: Dishing It Out

By R. J. PIKE
A near-capacity crowd last night
in Hill Auditorium of assorted
tenney-bops, hippies and straight
types watched the Lovin' Spoon-
ful knock themselves out on 28
of their best-known hits.
Unfortunately, some decidedly
sloppy audio mixing marred the
otherwise enthusiastic perform-
ance. All but a few numbers were
far too loud for Hill's unusually
good accoustics.,
Several critical attributes set
the Spoonful above virtually all
other U.S. pop groups. First, more
than any other electric foursome,
save the Beatles, the Spoonful
have assimilated material from
many and varied musical idioms.
Also evident in the concert was
the group's knack for delivering in
person most, if not always all, of
the sounds that appear on their
albums.
Yet, the live performances were
never prosaic carbon copies of
disc material. The creativity was
right there on stage.
Typical of the Spoonful's ever-
evolving musical direction was the
inclusion of two or three new
songs. One of them was a percep-
tive children's song by John Se-
bastian, sung for the first time at
Hill. When queried by the writer
about future probable direction of
their music, leader Sebastian could
only shug honestly, "I have no
idea, just for ward, I guess." Pre-
sumably Lennon and McCartny
would have said much the same
thing for the Beatles.
There is little question that
the Spoonful are vocally and in-
strumentally equipped to lead the
way in the American pop music
scene. It is a pity that over-zeal-
ous application of Detroit Edison's
product at Hill all but submerged
the wry, witty, and lyric message

carried by so many of the Spoon-
ful's songs.
The unadorned directness and
simplicity of these songs are at
once both ageless and immediately
relevant to contemporary society
in this country.
It would be presumptuous to cite
one or two members of the group
for extraordinary skill or talent.
All four contribute vitally to the
"good-time" sound that has made
them famous and respected artists
in a field now well super-satur-
ated with electric long-hairs.
'But it is the life-long nurtured

artistry of Sebastian that appears
to 'supply so much of the Spoon-
ful "character." One of the top
half-dozen white blues-harp men
in the world, the bespectacled chief
Spoonful has imparted into his
superlative playing plenty of that
much-abused and little-understood
quality loosely known as "soul."
The obvious message of their
music is love, baby, and if you
don't know why, just Listen! The
Hill concert included all the rec-
orded favorites. If the crowd didn't
get the message, the only ones to
blame are the "engineers" who

failed to properly set up and the
group's vocal-instrumental balance
before the show.
People should not have to pay
$3.50 for presumably choice seats
only to be blasted clear out of
them.
It was doubly unfair to many
of the patrons, for they were
cheated out of properly hearing
the beauty of this exceptional
music. But it was even more un-
fair to the performers who deserve
only the best that Michigan could
offer for their unique talent.

,UNION-LEAGUE presents
A Poetry Reading by
GERARD MALANGA
poet, dancer, film-maker,
film star, special juror of the
Fifth Ann Arbor Film Festival
4:00 Sunday, March 12
in the UGLI multipurpose room
ADMISSION FREE

The Untiversity of Mich igan
Gilbert & Sullivan Society
Presents
PATIENCE
March 22, 23,24,2
Wed., Thurs. Performances..............$1.50
Fri., Sat. Performances........ .. $2.50
Sat. Matinee.......................$1.50
Tickets on sale 9:00 to 5:00 March 13-14, S.A.B.
UN ION-L rAGUE
announces
MASS MEETING
for
SOPH SHOW CENTRAL

4

The Week To Come:A Campus Calendar

"A GREAT
PICTURE!"
COS ANGELES
HERALD VAM4S4U

SUNDAY, MARCH 12
2:30 and 8:30 p.m.-The Pro-
fessional Theatre Program will
present "An Evenings Frost" star-
ring Will Gerr at the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
MONDAY, MARCH 13
8:30 p.m.-The University Musi-
cal Society Choral Union Series
presents Shirley Verreet, mezzo-
soprano at Hill Aud.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15
4:10 p.m.-G. P. Gould of the
classics department of Harvard
University will speak on "An Ap-
preciation of Petronius" in Aud. A.
4:15 p.m.-Theodor H. Gastor,
professor of religions at Barnard
College, Columbia University, will
speak on "Folklore in the Old
Testament" in Aud. D.
8:00 p.m.-The Department of
Speech University Players present
Arthur Miller's "After the Fall"
in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
presents the University Varsity

and Concert Band directed by
George R. Cavender in Hill Aud.
THURSDAY ,MARCH 16
4:15 p.m.-Theodor H. Gastor,]
professor of religion at Barnard
College, Columbia University, will
speak on "A New Aproach to the
Prophets" in Aud. D.
4:30 p.m.- An International
Center Tea will be held at 603
East Madison.
7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
Guild presents "Les Quarte Cents
Coups The 400 Blows)" as part
of a weekend of Francios Truf-
fant in the Architecture Aud.
7:45 p.m.- Frank Koen will
present a Linguistics Department
Lecture on "Some Possible Im-
plications of Psychological Per-
formance for Linguistics Rules" in
the Rackham Amphitheater
8:00 p.m.-The Department of
Speech University Players presents
Arthur Miller's "After the Fall"
in Trueblood Aud.
FRIDAY, MARCH 17
..7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
Guild presents "Les Quartes
Cents Coups" The 400 Blows) as
part of a Francios Truffant week-
end in the Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.--The Department of

Speech University Players present
Arthur Miller's "After the Fall"
in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The.School of Music
presents the University Arts
Chorale and Womne's Choir, May-
nard Klein directing, in Rackham
Lecture Hall.
SATURDAY, MARCH 18
7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
Guild presents "Tirez Sur le
Pianiste Shoot the Piano Player)"
as part of a Francois Truffant
weekend in the Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The Department of
Speech University Players present
Arthur Miller's "After the Fall"
in Trueblood Aud.
SUNDAY, MARCH 19
2:00 p.m.-The school of Music
presents Robert Noehren in an
organ recital playing "The Music
of Bach" at the First Baptist
Church.
4:15 p.m.--The School of Music
presents Clayton Huard in a pi-
ano recital in the School of Music
recital hall.
7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
Guild presents "Tirez Sur le Pi-
aniste (Shoot the Piano Player)"
as part of a Francois weekend in
the Architecture Aud.

iij

Shows at
1:00 -3:35
6:20 - 8:5D

COMING
"The SHAMELESS
OLD LADY"

COMMITTEE

041

TV Highlights

EDITOR'S NOTE: In response
to a number of requests, The
Daily is initiating this listing of
the television highlights of the
week to come as a service to our
readers. This feature will ap-
pear every Sunday.
SUNDAY, MARCH 12
1 p.m. - MEET THE PRESS.
Charles L. Weltner, new deputy
chairman of the Democratic Na-
tional Committee faces a panel of
reporters.--4
1:30 p.m.-ISSUES AND AN-
SWERS. Secretary of State Dean,
Rusk appears. He will probably
discuss U.S. Vietnam policy in-
cluding the recent escalation of
the war.-7
4 p.m.-215T CENTURY. "The
Remarkable Schoolhouse," narrat-
ed by Walter Cronkite, examines
changes taking place in Ameri-
can education. Leading educators
will debate the merits of educa-
tional innovation.-2
6:30 p.m.-BELL TELEPHONE
,HOUR. "Toscanini: The Maestro
Revisited" marks the centennial
month of conductor Arturo Tos-
canini. The show includes home
movies by his son, Walter Tosca-
nini, still shots of an NBC Sym-
phony rehearsal and films of Tos-
sacini's concerts. Narrated by New
York Times music critic Harold
C. Schonberg.-4
TUESDAY, MARCH 14
8:30 p.m.-THE BEST YEARS
OF OUR LIVES. William Wyler's
1946 Academy Award winner about
three World War II veterans at-
tempting to pick up the pieces of
their civilian lives. Frederick
March, Myrna Loy, Dana Andrews,
Teresa Wright and Virginia Mayo
star.-2
10:30 p.m.-PUBLIC EYE. CBC
news analysis of "NATO in Tran-
sition" studies the state of the
European alliance. Gen. Lyman
Lemnitzer, NATO supreme com-

mander, and Harlen Cleveland,
U.S. permanent representative to
NATO, appear.-9.
THURSDAY, MARCH 16
7:30 p.m.--PROJECT 20. "The
End of the Trail" examines the
disruption of Plains Indian civ-
ilization as the white man moved
west. Walter Brennan narrates,
music by Robert Russell Bennett.
--4
FRIDAY, MARCH 17
9:30 p.m.-HALLMARK HALL
OF FAME. Lynn Fontaine and Julie
Harris star in "Anastasia," the
drama of a 1926 conspiracy to im-
personate the Russian princess An-
astasia and steal the Romanov for-
tune.-4
Phone 434-0190
li n &u&cmOr CARPENTER R D
OPEN 6:30 P.M. FIRST RUN
NOW SHOWING
a Shown at 7:15 & 10:25
BEDTIME
STOR
but
NOT QQ1j1
for
children colo
Also-
TflI PAD (AND NOW
shown at, OUS T
9 P.M. Onl
. . -
Plus-"WATER COLOR HOLIDAY"
Color Cartoon

4

PARAMOUNT PICTURES preunts A HARRY SALTZMAN Production

Ut was
going to be
a lovely:
funeral8:::
atPalmer
it wouldn't
MICH"AEL C

H ELD OVER
nd BIG
:EWEEKI
MINE.I

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I

Funera in lrin
PAUL HUBSCHMID -OSCAR HOMOLKA
=-EVA RENZI"
TECHNICOLOR*- PANAVISION"
Feature Times
1:15-3:15-5:15-7:20-9:20
Next: NIGHT OF THE GENERALS

e i

p

DEPARTMENT of NEAR EASTERN
LANGUAGES and LITERATURES
announces
The 1967 Zwerdling Lectureship
in Old Testament Studies
Wednesday and Thursday, March 15 and 16

I"

DOUBLE BILLING!
OPEN CITY
with Anna Magnani
De Cicca's

II

BICYCLE
THIEF

Brought back by special
arrangements . Regular
admission $1.25
Complete Shows:
Fri. 7:00. 10:25
Sat. 5:00, 8:25
Sun. 3:00, 5:25
Mon. 7:00, 10:25

The biographical information-
to be printed in very small type
below the photograph-is typed
below.
B.A. Hons. and M.A. U. of
London, Ph.D., Columbia, D.D.,
honoris causa, U. of Vermont
Guggenheim Fellow; and Ful-
bright Professor, U of Rome and
U. of Melbourne, Prof. of Reli-
gion, Barnard. Formerly Prof.
The Dropsie College, Farleigh
Dickinson U., New York U.,
Columbia, U. of Chicago, Pa-
cific School of Religion, U of
Ipr tAc j of I nnr II) o

DR. TH EODOR H. GASTER
Professor Barnard College, Columbia
in Auditorium D of Angell Hall at 4:15 p.m.
Wednesday, "A New Approach to the Prophets"
Thursday, "The Folklore in the Old Testament"
Also, Wednesday, March 15, at 8:15 p.m.

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